GPS Cycle and Walking Routes


Northumberland National Park Walks

Please use the links below to view full route information including descriptions, elevation profiles, interactive maps and GPS downloads.

You can also view an overview map of all the routes in the using the Northumberland National Park Walk Map


Route NamePhotoDistanceDescription
Catcleugh Reservoir6 miles (9.5 km)This walk takes you along Catcleugh Reservoir before climbing to Girdle Fell for great views over the Northumberland National Park.
The reservoir is located just off the A68 road near Byrness. There's a nice path leading south off the A68 which you can follow along the water. It's a lovely area with the reservoir surrounded by attractive countryside, heather, grassland and a mixture of native and conifer woodlands. It's also great for wildlife spotting with the higher moorland area a breeding ground for golden plover and dunlin. You may also see birds of prey such as buzzards, ospreys and occasionally a golden eagle.  Other wildlife to look out for includes otter, red squirrel, badger and roe deer.
After passing the southern side of the water the path then climbs past Castle Crag Forest to Girdle Fell. From here there are wonderful views back down to the reservoir.
The reservoir is located in Kielder Forest where you can enjoy miles of great cycling and walking trails. Just a few miles to the south you can visit Kielder Water and try the Kielder Forest Lakeside Way.
The climb to Deadwater Fell is also just a few miles to the west. From here there are more great views to the Lake District and the Scottish Hills. View Full Details>>
Hareshaw Linn3 miles (5 km)This walk takes you to the beautiful Hareshaw Linn waterfall in the Northumberland National Park. The walk begins in the village of Bellingham and follows footpaths through ancient woodland and over six bridges to the 9 metre high waterfall. On the way you will pass a series of smaller waterfalls. Look out for red squirrels, great spotted woodpeckers, wood warblers, badgers and bats on the way.
The Pennine Way runs past the falls so you could pick this up to continue your walking in the area. View Full Details>>
Hedgehope Hill6 miles (9 km)Climb to the 714 metres (2,343 ft) summit of Hedgehope Hill in the Cheviots on this challenging walk. The walk begins at the parking area at Langleeford by the Harthope Burn. You then ascend towards Housey Crags and Long Crags and onto the summit where there are fabulous views towards the coast and Lindisfarne Castle. You can descend the same way or head towards Harthope Linn waterfall where you can follow the Harthope Burn back to Langleeford.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could climb the The Cheviot and Windy Gyle or pick up the Pennine Way. View Full Details>>
Housesteads4 miles (6.5 km)Visit the fascinating Housesteads Roman Fort on this circular walk around Hadrian's Wall in the Northumberland National Park. The fort dates from AD 124 and includes a barracks block, hospital, Commander's House, granaries and communal toilets which are all still visible today.
You can start the walk from the Housesteads car park on the Military Road just south of the fort. You then climb steadily up to the fort where you can explore the buildings and enjoy wide ranging views over the surrounding countryside, woodland and hills. The walk then heads west along Housesteads Crags and Hotbank Crags where you can actually walk on a section of the wall. Just before Crag Lough you turn north and then east, following another footpath past Ridley Common and Broomlee Lough. After rounding King's Wicket, you pass Milecastle 36, King's Hill and Clew Hill before returning to the fort and the car park.
To extend your walk you can continue west along the path and visit the iconic Sycamore Gap. The famous tree was voted England's tree of the year in 2016. It is located just over a mile west of Housesteads near to the pretty Crag Lough.
Another option is to pick up the Pennine Way and follow it between Broomlee Lough and Greenlee Lough towards Haughton Common.
If you head east along Hadrian's Wall Path you will soon come to Carrawburgh which was the site of a 3˝ acre auxiliary fort.
You can virtually explore the fort and the Hadrian's Wall Path using the google street view link below! You can see all the buildings and the wonderful views over the national park from the fort's high points. View Full Details>>
Ingram Valley14 miles (22 km)This walk takes you on a tour of the beautiful Ingram Valley in the Northumberland National Park. You'll pass along rivers and burns with miles of open moorland and the Cheviot Hills making a splendid backdrop.
The walk starts at the village of Ingram and heads west along the River Breamish and the Greensidehill burn towards Brough Law and Linhope. At Hartside you turn south and head towards Alnhamoor crossing the river as you go. You continue to Little Dod before picking up Salter's Road (a track) to climb High Cantle hill. You continue east towards Linhope where you can take a short detour to visit the splendid Linhope Spout waterfall. From Linhope you soon pick up the country lane from the start of the walk which will return you to Ingram.
If you'd like to continue your walks in the area then you could climb the nearby Hedgehope Hill and The Cheviot. View Full Details>>
Kielder Forest Lakeside Way22 miles (35 km)This fantastic circular cycling and walking route takes you around the beautiful Kielder Water in Kielder Forest Park, Northumberland. The route is known as the Lakeside Way and follows the shoreline of the reservoir on a lovely multi-user track. Along the way you can see twenty pieces of outdoor public art including the futuristic Belvedere shelter and the three large rotating Janus Chairs. There's excellent wildlife spotting opportunities with Ospreys regularly seen around the reservoir.
The route also passes Kielder Dam and Kielder Castle where you will find an excellent visitor centre with exhibitions, information and a cafe. The castle is also the centre for cycling within the park - you can hire a bike here or get your own repaired. It is located at the northern tip of the reservoir at Kielder village.
If you're looking for a more challenging cycle ride you will also find several colour coded mountain bike trails within the park. They range from the easy Borderline trail to the thrilling Deadwater black trail. 
For great views over the Lake District and the Scottish Hills you could climb Deadwater Fell from Kielder Castle.
A few miles to the north there's a nice climb to Girdle Fell with great views over the lovely Catcleugh Reservoir. View Full Details>>
Linhope Spout3 miles (5 km)This short walk takes you to this lovely waterfall in the Ingram Valley. The walk starts at Hartside where there is parking available by the roadside. You then follow a country lane to Linhope where you cross the River Breamish. You then ascend to the waterfall and Linhope burn on footpaths. The waterfall is an impressive 60 foot (18m) chute of water landing into a deep plunge pool below. On the walk there are splendid views of Great Standrop and Hedgehope Hill. Look out for Curlew and red squirrels on the way.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could climb the nearby Hedgehope Hill and The Cheviot. View Full Details>>
Simonside Hills7 miles (11 km)The Simonside Hills are a fabulous place for walkers with miles of footpaths taking you through woodland and moorland to wonderful viewpoints. You'll pass interesting rock formations, rocky outcrops and acres of forest as you make your way through this wildly beautiful area of the Northumberland National Park.
This circular walk starts at the parking area in Rothbury Forest and climbs to the 430m high Simonside Hill. From here there are wonderful views of the Cheviots, the River Coquet, Cragside Country Park and the Northumbrian coastline. You descend towards Harwood Forest before picking up the St Oswald's Way to return you to the car park.
It's easy to continue your walking in the area by heading to the wonderful Cragside Country Park which is located just a few miles away. You could also continue along the St Oswald's Way deeper into Harwood Forest. View Full Details>>
Sycamore Gap3 miles (5.5 km)Sycamore Gap was voted England's tree of the year in 2016. It stands in a dramatic dip next to Hadrian's wall in the Northumberland National Park. The tree is known as the 'Robin Hood' tree after famously featuring in the film 'Robin Hood Prince of Thieves' starring Kevin Costner. This circular walk makes use of the Hadrian's Wall Path and the Pennine Way to take you to the iconic tree and around the pretty Crag Lough.
The walk starts at the Steel Rigg car park just to the west of the tree. You then pick up the footpath to Steel Rigg and on to Sycamore Gap. After taking some photos of the strikingly positioned tree the path continues around Crag Lough. The route then follows public footpaths back to the car park, passing Hound Hill on the way.
You can extend your walk by continuing east along the path to Hotbank Crags and Housesteads Wood. Here you can physically walk on Hadrian's Wall for a short section. There's some magnificent views on this elevated section of the path. If you keep heading east you will soon come to the famous Housteads Roman Fort. The fascinating fort dates from  AD 124 and is well worth a visit. The barracks block, hospital, Commander's House, granaries and communal toilets are all still visible today.
You can virtually explore the footpath around Sycamore Gap on the google street view link below. View Full Details>>
The Cheviot9 miles (14 km)Climb to the 815 m (2,674 ft) summit of the highest hill in the Cheviot hills. The walk begins at the parking area at Langleeford by the Harthope Burn. The route then ascends along public footpaths and with the burn on your left. You continue to Cairn Hill passing the pretty Harthope Linn waterfall on the way. At Cairn Hill you pick up the Pennine Way to take you to the summit. This section takes place on stone slabs through an area of peat bog. At the summit you can enjoy excellent views of the North Sea, the Lake District Fells, Cross Fell and the Lammermuir Hills. You then descend back to Langleeford via Scald Hill.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the Cheviots you could climb Windy Gyle or pick up the Pennine Way. View Full Details>>
Usway Burn14 miles (22 km)Enjoy some lovely waterside walking along the Usway Burn and the River Coquet on this route in the Northumberland National Park. The walk begins next to the parking area at Alwinton and follows a footpath to the Usway Burn. You follow the path north along the burn with waterfalls, woodland paths and wonderful views of the Cheviots. Just after entering the edge of Kidland Forest you turn south and head towards Barrowburn. Here you pick up a country lane which runs along the River Coquet through the beautiful Upper Coquetdale. This lane takes you to the finish point back at Alwinton. View Full Details>>
Walltown Crags4 miles (6 km)Visit one of the best preserved sections of Hadrian's Wall on this short walk in Northumberland. The walk starts at the car park near Greenhead and follows the Hadrian's Wall Path to Walltown Crags. There are splendid views towards Haltwhistle and the River South Tyne. The route also includes a waterside section along the Tipalt Burn, before passing through Greenhead and returning to the car park. View Full Details>>
Windy Gyle10 miles (16 km)Climb to the summit of this hill in the Cheviots and enjoy fabulous views into Scotland and England as you stand high on the border.
The walk begins from the Wedder Leap car park and heads towards Shorthope hill, crossing the River Coquet and following the Rowhope Burn as you go. You continue the climb to Little Ward Law before coming to Russel's Cairn at the 619 m (2,031 ft) summit of Windy Gyle. From here there are wonderful views over the Scottish Borders, the Eildon Hills and Edinburgh.
You begin the descent by heading west along the Pennine Way and then south towards Swineside Law and Hindside Knowe. Shortly after you cross the River Coquet and return to the car park. This is a challenging walk but the footpaths are generally good and you're rewarded with some stunning scenery.
To continue your walking in the Cheviots you could climb the highest hill - The Cheviot. View Full Details>>
Yeavering Bell3 miles (5 km)Climb to the summit of this hilll in the Cheviots and visit the largest Iron Age hillfort in the region. The walk starts near Kirknewton and climbs to the fort on public footpaths and the St Cuthbert's Way long distance path. At the fort you can see the platforms of more than one hundred timber-built roundhouses and an inner fort on a 12 acre site. If you're staying in nearby Wooler you could follow the St Cuthbert's Way west to the site as an alternative route. View Full Details>>

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