123 Search Results Found

Route NamePhotoDistanceDescription
Crawfordsburn Country Park1 miles (1 km)Follow the waymarked walking trails through this large country park in County Down. The park is located near Bangor on the coast with beautiful beaches, views across Belfast Lough, meadows, streams, wooded glens and a stunning waterfall. Look out for wildlife including seals, herons, shags and guillemots. View Full Details>>
Scrabo Tower1 miles (1 km)Scrabo Hill and country park is located near Newtownards in County Down, Northern Ireland. You can follow footpaths to the top of the hill where you will find the well known landmark Scrabo Tower. The 19th century tower is 125 feet (38 m) high and visible for miles around. The views from the summit of Scrabo Hill extend to Strangford Lough, the Mourne Mountains and the Scottish coast. You can pick up the footpath from the car park. It's a short climb of less than half a mile but quite steep.
After descending the hill you can continue to explore Scrabo Country Park. There are nice woodland trails through Killynether Woods with lots of bluebells in the springtime.
To extend your walking in the area you pick up the Comber Greenway from nearby Comber. This cycling and walking trail runs along National Cycle Network route 99 and a disused railway line from Belfast to Comber. View Full Details>>
Mount Stewart1 miles (1.5 km)Enjoy the woodland trails, lakeside paths and beautiful gardens surrounding this 19th-century house in County Down. The footpaths are surfaced and well laid out so it is a nice easy walk for families or anyone looking for a peaceful afternoon stroll. There's 950 acres (380 ha) of National Trust managed estate to explore through farmland, woodland, orchards and a walled garden. The highlight is probably the lovely 7 acre lake which is surrounded by paths lined with Rhododendrons, Azaleas and Magnolias. There's also statues, follies and other interesting structures such as the Temple of the Winds. From this octagonal building there are great views towards Strangford Lough, the Mourne Mountains and Belfast Hills. The area is great for wildlife spotting too. Look out for buzzards, red squirrels and various butterflies around the meadows.
The Strangford Lough Cycle Route runs close to the estate so if you wanted to visit by bike you could follow the trail from Newtownards before turning right down Ballycastle Road toward the estate.
You can virtually explore the paths of the estate on the google street view link below! View Full Details>>
Castlewellan Forest Park2 miles (4 km)Enjoy a walk around Castlewellan Lake and Arboretum in County Down. The park contains the national Arboretum of Northern Ireland with a variety of interesting specimens from all over the world. There is also a peace maze and the the Scottish baronial Castlewellan castle. It's a lovely place, with views towards the Mourne Mountains and surrounding countryside to enjoy. The park is also great for mountain biking with green, blue and red grade trails to try.
To extend your exercise, just head to the south and visit the lovely Tollymore Forest Park. The expansive 1600 acre park contains an arboretum, the Shimna River and two forested hills known as the Drinns.
Also nearby is the splendid Murlough Bay National Nature Reserve where there is a beautiful sand dune system, woodland trails and a wonderful beach. View Full Details>>
Bolberry Down1 miles (1.6 km)This easy circular walk explores the National Trust owned Bolberry Down on the Devon coast. It's a splendid place for walk with a fully accessible surfaced path, wildflowers in the summer, pockets of gorse and spectacular coastal views towards Burgh Island and Bigbury Bay.
You can start your walk from the National Trust car park, just to the south of the village of Bolberry. Then pick up the one mile path around the site. If you prefer a longer walk you could start from nearby Salcombe and follow the South West Coast Path to the down. To extend your walk you can follow the coast path west to the headland of Bolt Tail.
Heading in the other direction will take you to towards Salcombe where you can try the Salcombe and Bolt Head Circular Walk. View Full Details>>
Comber Greenway7 miles (12 km)This cycling and walking trail runs along National Cycle Network route 99 and a disused railway line from Belfast to Comber. It makes for a great traffic free cycle along a nice tree lined tarmac path. As such it's great for families or anyone looking for an easy introduction to cycling. The route runs for about 7 miles from Dee Street in East Belfast to the town of Comber in County Down.  You'll pass the C. S. Lewis statue at the Holywood Arches, and the Bloomfield Walkway in Belfast before enjoying nice views of Stormont, Scrabo Tower, the Harland & Wolff cranes and the Belfast Hills.
To extend your cycle you can continue along National Route 99 towards Scrabo Hill, and Newtownards. This takes you to the tip of the beautiful Strangford Lough.
To extend your walking in the area you could climb to Scrabo Tower which is not far from the route. You can follow footpaths to the top of the hill where you will find the well known landmark. View Full Details>>
Newlands Corner2 miles (3.5 km)This lovely beauty spot on the North Downs is great for walking with a number of footpaths to try. There's several nice woodland trails and open chalk downland with wonderful views over the Surrey Hills. This circular walk starts from the excellent Newlands Corner Visitor centre where you will find information, a cafe, picnic tables and a car park. It's located just a few miles east of Guildford town centre so is easily accessible. The walk follows the North Downs Way and other footpaths around the visitor centre. You'll visit Albury Downs and Walnut Tree Bottom with lots of opportunities to sit on one of the many benches and soak in the splendid views.
It's a great area for flora and fauna. In the summer the grassland is covered with a variety of wildflowers. In the woodland area you may see roe deer, green woodpeckers, nuthatches and tawny owls. View Full Details>>
Pilot Hill2 miles (3.5 km)Climb to the highest point in Hampshire on this walk on the Berkshire/Hampshire border. The walk starts from the Inkpen Beacon car park about 2 miles north west of the hill. From here you pick up the Wayfarer's Walk and follow it past Walbury Hill and the pretty West Woodhay Down. At 297 m (974 ft) Walbury Hill is the highest point in Berkshire and South East England. At the summit you can enjoy more great views over the county and explore the Iron Age Hill fort of Walbury Camp.
The route continues to Pilot Hill where you pick up the Brenda Parker Way to take you to the Hampshire village of Faccombe. Here you can enjoy refreshments before returning to the car park the same way.
To extend your walk you can continue along the Brenda Parker Way to Faccombe Wood and St Mary Bourne. View Full Details>>
Mardon Down5 miles (8 km)Climb to Mardon Down on Dartmoor and enjoy wonderful far reaching views over the surrounding area. The hill is also home to a fascinating set of ancient stone circles and covered with lots of interesting plants and flowers. It's a really pretty spot and well worth the challenging climb.
The walk starts in the village of Moretonhmapstead about 1.5 miles south west of the hill. You then follow footpaths towards Yarningdale before crossing the down. You'll pass a cairn circle before coming to Mardon Down stone circle which is the biggest on Dartmoor. The walk climbs to well over 1000 ft so it is a fairly challenging ascent. You are rewarded with wonderful views towards the Devon coast, Hay Tor, Hound Tor and Exmoor. It's great for wildlife too with birds such as stonechats, skylarks and cuckoos to look out for. You might also see Dartmoor ponies and rabbits as you make your way across the hill.
You can continue across the down towards Cod Wood, Dunsford Wood Nature Reserve and Meadhaydown Nature Reserve. These are all just a mile or so north east of Mardon Down.
Both the Dartmoor Way and the Dartmoor Ramble pass Moretonhmapstead so it is easy to extend your walking in the area. View Full Details>>
Wayland's Smithy7 miles (11 km)Visit this fascinating Neolithic long barrow and chamber tomb on this circular walk on the The Ridgeway. The historical site dates from 3460–3400 BC and includes a burial chamber consisting of a narrow and partially constricted passage, leading to a pair of small side chambers. It's an interesting and atmospheric place with great views of the surrounding countryside and several walking trails to further explore the area.
You can park at the Uffington White Horse car park to start the walk. Head south from the car park along a section of the Lambourn Valley Way to meet with The Ridgeway. You then follow the trail west for about a mile to reach the site.
After exploring the site, the route heads south east across Knighton Down, before turning north east across Whit Coombe. Here you pick up the Lambourn Valley Way and turn north, crossing Woolstone Down where there is a disc barrow about 50 feet (15 m) in diameter and two bowl barrows.  Iron Age pottery has been found in the area.
The final section takes you across Uffington Down, back to the car park.
You can extend your walk by continuing south along the Lambourn Valley Way, crossing the Lambourn Downs before picking up the River Lambourn. View Full Details>>
Slieve Donard5 miles (8 km)Climb to the highest peak in Northern Ireland on this challenging walk in the Mourne Mountains. It's a beautiful area with a waterside section along the Glen River a real highlight of the walk. The river has rocky pools, pretty waterfalls and surrounded by attractive woodland. The climb to the summit passes along the Mourne Wall which runs for 22 miles over 15 mountains. It was constructed in the early part of the 20th century.
The walk starts from the attractive coastal town of Newcastle in County Down. After leaving the car park in Donard Park the route heads through the Scots Pine and Oak of Donard Forest. You'll follow the lovely Glen River Path to the Mourne Wall where you turn left to reach the 850m (2,789 ft) summit. From here the views are spectacular with Newcastle Beach, the Isle of Man, Scotland and Wales all visible on a clear day. Also at the summit you will find a small stone tower and two prehistoric burial cairns.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could visit the nearby Tollymore Forest Park with its riverside walks and waymarked, woodland walking trails.
Also nearby is the splendid Murlough Bay National Nature Reserve where there is a beautiful sand dune system, woodland trails and a wonderful beach. View Full Details>>
Chantry Wood2 miles (3.5 km)Explore 200 acres of woodland and meadows on this circular walk in Chantry Wood in Guildford. There's miles of woodland trails to follow with the North Downs Way passing along the northern edge of the forest (you can see some of this section on the google street view link below). There's a fair amount of climbing on the trails with nice views over the surrounding area from the high points. Look out for carpets of pretty bluebells in the springtime and a variety of birdlife all year round.
This walk starts at the car park at the eastern end of the woods and follows the North Downs Way across the northern edge before picking up other trails to return you to the start point. View Full Details>>
Pewley Down6 miles (10 km)This walk visits the Pewley Down viewpoint near Guildford. The route includes a canal-side stretch and a visit to Chantry Woods, before climbing the hill.
The walk starts on the River Wey Navigation Canal near to the train station in Guildford. You follow the Wey South Path along the canal to Shalford Park where you pick up the North Downs Way. Follow it east and it will take you through Chantry Wood. The woods have some nice trails to try and pretty bluebells in the spring.
Just before you reach Halfpenny Lane you turn north west and follow the Mile Path bridleway up to Pewley Down. From here there's nice views over the surround North Downs countryside and woodland. View Full Details>>
St Martha's Hill2 miles (3 km)This circular walk visits the lovely St Martha's Hill in the North Downs, near Guildford. From the high points there are tremendous views of the Surrey Hills and Newlands Corner.
The walk starts from the St Martha's Hill, Guildford Lane Car Park, just east of the hill. You then follow the North Downs Way to the high point and the 19th century church of St Martha's. The hill summit stands at 574 feet (175 m) and commands wonderful views of the surrounding area. There are also a number of nice woodland trails, attractive grassland and a number of interesting plants. View Full Details>>
Ventnor Downs2 miles (4 km)Visit the highest point on the Isle of Wight and enjoy wonderful views over the island's coast and countryside on this circular walk. Look out for various pretty wildflowers, heather and New Forest Ponies on St Boniface Down. You may also see other wildlife such as skylark, meadow pipit, buzzards, kestrels, various butterflies and a herd of Old English goats which graze on Bonchurch Down and Coombe Bottom.  The area also has an interesting military history with various WW2 buildings and the RAF Ventnor Radar Station which played an important role in the Battle of Britain.
The walk starts from the Ventnor Down National Trust car park and takes you across Luccombe Down, Bonchurch Down and St Boniface Down. There's some challenging climbing but you are rewarded with fabulous views to Sandown Bay, Culver Cliffs and Portsmouth.
You can extend your walk by heading to the nearby Wroxall Down or by following the Isle of Wight Coast Path west to St Catherine's Lighthouse. The Shanklin to Ventnor Coastal Walk is also very popular with more lovely sea views and some interesting woodland trails.
You can visit the downs by bike by following Regional Cycle Route 67 otherwise known as the 'Round the Island' route. View Full Details>>
Hamstead Trail8 miles (13 km)Cross the western end of the Isle of Wight from north to south, and enjoy spectacular coastal views on this splendid trail.
The trail starts at Hamstead Point on the northern coast, and climbs towards Shalcombe Down, passing Cranmore and Wellow on the way. This first section passes through woodland, near Cranmore, where red squirrels are often spotted.
As the path climbs through Wellow and Shalcombe Down you will enjoy fabulous views of the Isle of Wight coastline, including the Needles and St Catherines Point. The walk finishes descending to Brook Bay on the southern coast of the island.
The Tennyson Trail and the Freshwater Trail from Yarmouth to Freshwater Bay are good options for extending your walking in this part of the island. View Full Details>>
Salisbury Plain6 miles (9 km)This walk explores a section of the ancient Salisbury Plain with its chalk grassland, fascinating historical sites and wide ranging views. It's an unusual landscape with a fascinating prehistoric history and a mock German village serving as Military training area.
The walk starts in the village of Tilshead which is roughly at the centre of Salisbury Plain. The small village includes a Grade I listed church, dating from the 12th century. There's also the Rose and Crown pub where you can enjoy refreshments after your walk.
You begin from the village and follow a country lane south west before heading across Tilshead Down, passing a Neolithic long barrow as you go.
The route continues across Copehill Down where there is a Ministry of Defence training facility. It was constructed in 1988 to resemble a Bavarian German village, providing troops with a simulated backdrop when training for European operations.
After passing the village the route picks up a section of the Imber Range Perimeter Path. You'll pass the National Trust's White Barrow, a large Neolithic long barrow stretching for 77.5 metres. Shortly after you return to the finish point back in the village. View Full Details>>
Tennyson Trail14 miles (23 km)This walk runs from Newport to Alum Bay via Brighstone, Freshwater and Tennyson Down.
The walk starts at Carisbrooke, near the fascinating Carisbrooke Castle where Charles I was imprisoned. You can enjoy the new Princess Beatrice Garden and the tranquil chapel at this fine historical attraction. Use google street view below to explore the castle.
You then head through the beautiful Brighstone Down and Brighstone Forest before arriving at the coast where there are splendid views over Freshwater towards Alum Bay and the Needles.
The final section takes you through the coastal Freshwater Bay Golf course and then through Tennyson Down before finishing at the delightful Alum Bay. This is quite a challenging walk with several climbs through the downs, but there are terrific views of the island to enjoy throughout.
To further explore this part of the island you can pick up the Hamstead Trail, Isle of Wight Coast Path or the Freshwater Trail from Yarmouth to Freshwater Bay. View Full Details>>
Three Shires Head4 miles (6 km)Explore this beautiful section of the Dane Valley and enjoy rivers, old stone bridges and waterfalls on this lovely walk in the Peak District.
Three Shires Head is a point on Axe Edge Moor where the counties of Cheshire, Derbyshire and Staffordshire meet. Here you will find a Grade II-listed packhorse bridge over the River Dane. The bridge is thought to have been constructed in the 18th century. It's a delightful area with a number of small waterfalls and the surrounding Peak District scenery to enjoy.
The walk begins from a parking area in Gradbach a couple of miles south of Three Shires Head. You then follow the Dane Valley Way and other footpaths to the bridge and the river. Here you will also find Panniers Pool, a popular place for a paddle or swim in the summer months.
An alternative route would be to come from Buxton and follow the Dane Valley Way across Axe Edge Moor to the bridge. This is a much longer walk but does pass through the pretty Buxton Country Park on the way.
To extend your walking in the area you could visit the fascinating Lud's Church. The deep chasm is located just to the west of the start point of this walk.
Just to the south you can climb to The Roaches. The elevated rocky ridge, includes fascinating rock formations and wonderful views of the surrounding countrsyide. It is one of the most popular walks in the Peak District. View Full Details>>
Embsay Reservoir1 miles (1.5 km)Enjoy a short stroll around this reservoir in North Yorkshire. It's a lovely, quiet spot, with great views across the surrounding moors, hills and countryside.
Start the walk from the car park at the south eastern end of the water. It's located at the end of Pasture Road, just to the north of the village of Embsay. You could also walk from the village, if you prefer. From the car park you can directly pick up the nice footpath running around the water. At the northern end there's a moderate climb to Crag Nook, with nice views back down to the water.
To extend your walking in the area just head north east and visit the Barden Reservoirs. View Full Details>>
Causey Arch2 miles (3 km)Visit the the oldest surviving single-arch railway bridge in the world and enjoy woodland trails along the Causey Burn on this lovely walk in Stanley. The site includes interesting geology and views of the Tanfield railway which runs through the area. Also look out for the replica of an old wooden horse drawn coal truck. At its peak the track would see hundreds of these waggons carrying coal to the bridge.
The bridge dates from 1725 and is a wonderful example of 18th century civil engineering. From the top of the arch there are splendid views down to the streams and woodland below.
The walk lasts for about 2 miles on fairly flat footpaths, but with a couple of moderate climbs on the way. After your exercise you can enjoy rest and refreshments at the nice on site tea room.
The walk starts from the car park just off the Causey Road. You could also start from Causey Arch railway station which is one of the stops on the Tanfield Heritage Railway. It's the oldest railway in the world, operating a passenger service every Sunday and on some other selected days. The railway runs on the former colliery wooden waggonway, using a number of preserved industrial steam locomotives. View Full Details>>
Fontmell and Melbury Downs5 miles (7.5 km)Enjoy a variety of beautiful flora and fauna in this nature reserve in Compton Abbas on the Dorset/Wiltshire border. The area is associated with the novels of Thomas Hardy and includes a climb to Melbury Hill for wonderful views over the area. Also look out for a variety of birds, butterflies, wildflowers and orchids in this delightful area.
The walk starts from the car park at the top of Spread Eagle Hill and follows footpaths to Compton Abbas. From here you climb past Compton Down before reaching the 863 feet summit of Melbury Hill. From here there are splendid views over Blackmore Vale, Vale of Wardour and Shaftesbury. The walk then descends back to Compton Abbas before crossing Fontmell Down and returning to the car park.
At the end of your walk you can enjoy refreshments at the Compton Abbas Airfield Restaurant which is located just to the east of the car park. View Full Details>>
Corfe Castle3 miles (5 km)This circular walk takes you around the Dorset village of Corfe Castle, visiting Corfe Common and passing the fascinating ruins of the 11th century ruined castle.
You can park at the car park off West Street before heading south to the common along public footpaths. Corfe Common is Dorset's largest area of common land and a lovely place for a walk. It's particularly lovely in the summer months when there are various wildflowers such as the rare wild chamomile. The bright yellow blossom of gorse is also a feature of this pretty area. Look out for wildlife including nightjar, Dartford warbler, butterflies and various reptiles.
On the common you can also climb to an elevated ridge for fabulous views towards the castle. The ridge reaches a height of about 200ft so it's a great spot to take some photos of the castle and the surrounding Purbeck countryside. On the ridge you will also find a series of bumps which are in fact 4,000 year old Bronze Age burial mounds.
After taking in the views you descend on the Purbeck Way back to the village. You'll pass the pretty Church of St. Edward which dates from the 12th century. It is well worth exploring with a 15th century font made of Purbeck marble, a fine Victorian interior and a fascinating 15th century reredos (a screen that would have been in front of the chancel) with carvings in white marble.
After passing through the town the trail then passes below the castle before climbing the hills just to the west of the site. From here there are more splendid views of the area.
You can also explore the castle ruins which are owned by the National Trust. The castle has a fascinating history being partially demolished in 1646 by the Parliamentarians during the English Civil War. There is a fee for this however.
After your walk you can enjoy refreshments in the village with lots of tea rooms and pubs to choose from.
To extend your walking in the area you can pick up the Purbeck Way long distance trail. If you head north west along the trail you will soon come to the wonderful Blue Pool. Here you will find a beautiful turquoise lake surrounded by peaceful woodland trails.
Heading east along the trail will take you into the splendid seaside town of Swanage. If you are staying in Swanage you could walk to the castle from there. It's a great walk with wonderful views over Poole Harbour and Studland.
If you head south along the Purbeck Way you can visit the wonderful coastal viewpoint at St Aldhelm's Head and the 13th century St Aldhelm's Chapel. This is located near the pretty village of Worth Matravers with its picture postcard village cottages and pretty village pond.
Another option is to follow the The Hardy Way to the marine wildlife reserve at Kimmeridge Bay. View Full Details>>
Box Hill Country Park2 miles (4 km)This park is run by the National Trust and has a number of splendid walking trails to enjoy. There are panoramic views of the western Weald and a riverside stroll along the River Mole. There are also excellent facilities with the Box Tree cafe and shop which sells local produce. Box Hill is located just north of Dorking in Surrey. View Full Details>>
Tyne Green Country Park2 miles (3 km)Enjoy a riverside walk or cycle along the River Tyne in this country park in Hexham. There are lovely tree lined avenues to stroll down, a golf course and club house, play area, cafe and watersports centre. Tyne Green is also good for birdwatching - look out for Goosander, Goldeneye and Teal on the river.
The park is located right next to Hexham railway station. View Full Details>>
Combe Gibbet2 miles (3 km)This walk climbs to the interesting structure of Combe Gibbet and continues on to Inkpen Hill. The gibbet was erected in 1676 for the purpose of gibbeting the bodies of George Broomham and Dorothy Newman. The gibbet was placed high on Gallows Down as a detterent to other criminals. It's now a popular tourist destination with great views and a number of footpaths to follow through the surrounding countryside. The hill is also a popular climb for cyclists with a number of bridleways to follow across Inkpen and Walbury Hill.
This walk starts at the Inkpen Beacon car park and climbs to the gibbet along the Test Way long distance footpath. It's a good path which leads to the Inkpen long barrow and then up onto Inkpen Hill. From here there are wonderful views over the surrounding Berkshire countryside.
The walk can be extended to visit the nearby Walbury Hill. At 297 m (974 ft) Walbury Hill is the highest point in Berkshire and South East England. At the summit you can enjoy more great views over the county and explore the Iron Age Hill fort of Walbury Camp. If you continue along the Test Way you can visit Combe Wood. You could also pick up the Wayfarer's Walk and head south east along a wonderful ridge top path to the nearby Pilot Hill, the highest hill in Hampshire. View Full Details>>
Hope Cove to Salcombe8 miles (12.5 km)A splendid coastal walk from the little village of Hope Cove to Salcombe on the South West Coast Path. It's a lovely section of the path with visits to the headlands of Bolt Head and Bolt Tail. You'll also pass through the National Trust owned Bolberry Down with its pretty gorse, wildflowers and stunning views. The route is about 8 miles with come moderate climbs along the cliffs, so a reasonable level of fitness is required.
The walk starts on the sea front at Hope Cove and follows the path round to Bolt Tail. The headland is the site of an Iron Age promontory fort and commands fabulous views down the coast into Cornwall.
The path continues east to Bolberry Down where there are some nice footpaths through some lovely coastal scenery and great views to Burgh Island and Bigbury Bay.
The next section takes you past the attractive Soar Cove to Bolt Head. This area is great for wildlife with Dartmoor Ponies grazing on the cliffs. You can also see coastal birds including Fulmar, Shag, and Cormorants.
The path then descends from Bolt Head into Salcombe, passing the pretty beaches and Salcombe Castle. You also pass Tor Woods on your left, where you can sometimes see Sika Deer.
To extend your walking in the area you can visit the beautiful Kingsbridge Estuary. View Full Details>>
Serpent Trail64 miles (103 km)This walk runs from Haslemere to Petersfield through the beautiful Sussex greensand hills. The path takes its name both from its serpentine shape and from passing through the habitat of all three British species of snake.
The route crosses many heathland areas and heads along the greensand ridges in the western Weald, visiting Liphook, Milland, Fernhurst, Petworth, Fittleworth, Duncton, Heyshott, Midhurst, Stedham and Nyewood before reaching the serpent's tail at Petersfield Lake and Heath in Hampshire.
The trail is waymarked with white plastic discs showing a snake in the approximate shape of the route on a purple triangle.
Route highlights include a climb to the highest point on the South Downs at Black Down in West Sussex. You'll also visit the pretty Iping and Stedham Commons near Midhurst. View Full Details>>
Thornhill Trail2 miles (3 km)This easy cycling and walking trail runs along a disused railway line between Ladybower Dam down and Bamford station. It runs for just under 2 miles along a flat path with views of the River Derwent and a woodland section near the reservoir. It's a good one for families or anyone looking for an easy cycle or walk.
The route runs along a section of the Derwent Valley Heritage Way so there is scope for extending your walk along this long distance path. Heading south east will take you along the river to Hathersage.
There's also a good cycling trail around the Howden, Derwent and Ladybower Reservoirs. If you're on foot try the Ladybower Reservoir Walk or the climb to Win Hill. You can take a short detour from the path at Parkin Clough to climb the hill where you will enjoy fabulous views over the reservoir. The summit is only about a quarter of a mile west from the path and a great option if you are on foot. View Full Details>>
Salcombe and Bolt Head Circular Walk5 miles (8.5 km)This coastal circular walk takes you from Salcombe to the coastal headland at Bolt Head. There's much to enjoy with pretty bays, exhilarating cliff tops and a peaceful woodland section through Tor Woods towards the end of the route.
The walk starts at the North Sands car park near to Salcombe Castle. The ruined castle is located on a rocky outcrop which is easily reached on foot at low tide. From here you pick up the South West Coast Path and follow it south through Collaton Wood to the beach at South Sands and Splatcove Point. Around here you will pass the Overbeck's Museum and Garden. The National Trust owned site includes a colourful subtropical garden, with exotic and rare plants surrounding the seaside home of scientist and inventor Otto Overbeck. There's great views over the estuary and coast from the gardens and an interesting museum with Overbeck's art and natural history collection together with a display of items relating to the maritime history of the area.
After passing Overbeck's the route then heads through Fir Wood before following the coast path to Sharp Tor with views over Starehole Bay. This is the area where the Herzogin Cecilie ship ran aground in 1936. A dark patch of seaweed marks the site of the wreck.
Shortly after Starehole Bay you come to Bolt Head where there are fabulous views along the coast. The area is great for wildlife with Dartmoor Ponies grazing on the cliffs. Also look out for birds including Fulmar, Shag, and Cormorants.
From Bolt Head you head north west along the coast path towards Middle Soar where you turn right and head inland. The path then turns right again towards Tor Woods. These pretty woods contain lots of woodland flowers including bluebells, ramsons, wood sorrel and celadines. Look out for wildlife including Sika Deer as you make your way through this lovely area.
After exiting the woods you arrive back at the coast where it is a short walk back to the car park.
To extend your walking in the area you can continue north west along the coast path to Bolberry Down. This National Trust owned area has good surfaced paths, lots of pretty wildflowers and more great views. Just beyond Bolberry Down you will find Bolt Tail, the sister headland of Bolt Head.
Just to the north east of the town you can explore the Salcombe and Kingsbridge Estuary and look out for dolphins, seals, basking sharks and a variety of wading birds.
You can also catch the ferry over the estuary to East Portlemouth and follow the coast path to Prawle Point, the southernmost point of Devon. View Full Details>>
St Catherine's Lighthouse2 miles (4 km)Visit the most southerly point on the Isle of Wight on this circular walk around St Catherine's Point and St Catherine's Down. It's a particularly lovely part of the island with steep cliffs, attractive woodland, grassland with wildflowers and stunning coastal views.
The walk start from the Niton undercliff car park and follows footpaths down to St Catherine's Point via Knowles Farm. In 1901 Guglielmo Marconi, the inventor of the radiotelegraph system, succeeded in transmitting radio signals from Knowles Farm to the Lizard Radio Telegraph Station 186 miles away in Cornwall. The route continues around the impressive 19th century lighthouse, passing along the cliff towards Reeth Bay. Here you climb back to Knowles Farm and the car park passing the 16th century Buddle Inn. It's a charming Oldy Worlde Pub with outdoor seating and great views. It's roughly the half way point on the walk so an ideal place for refreshments!
If you'd like to extend your walk you could pick up the Isle of Wight Coast Path and follow it to the nearby Ventnor Downs. You can visit the lighthouse by bike by following Regional Cycle Route 67 otherwise known as the 'Round the Island' route. View Full Details>>
Leighton Reservoir6 miles (10 km)This circular walk visits Leighton and Roundhill Reservoirs before climbing into the surrounding moors for great views back down to the water.
You can start the walk from the roadside parking near the bridge and then follow paths along the woodland to Roundhill Reservoir. The route then climbs onto Arnagill Moor, where you will reach a height of over 1200ft. From these high points there are splendid views over the beautiful countryside of Nidderdale.
The route then descends through Head Moor before returning to the reservoirs.
You could start the walk from nearby Masham if you prefer. Then follow the Ripon Rowel west along the River Burn to the reservoir.
The reservoir is located very near to the fascinating Druids Temple. This replica of stonehenge sits on a hill just to the east of the start point for this walk. It's well worth a visit if you have time.
The long distance Six Dales Trail also passes the reservoirs. You can pick this up and follow it south across Fountains Earth Moor and visit Gouthwaite Reservoir to extend your exercise. Around here you can also pick up the Nidderdale Way and further explore this lovely area. View Full Details>>
Hawkridge Reservoir2 miles (2.5 km)Enjoy a circular walk around this pretty reservoir in the Quantock Hills area of Somerset. There's nice footpaths climbing above the reservoir, with lovely views across the water to the surrounding countryside and woodland.
You can start your walk from the roadside parking area on Lawyer's Hill. Then follow the road and public footpaths towards Ebsley Cottage at the eastern end of the water. The path then climbs towards Littledown with nice views back down to the reservoir.
To extend your walking in the area, head west to the Great Wood where you will find miles of waymarked cycling and walking trails.
On the south western fringe of Great Wood you will find Wills Neck, the highest point in the Quantock Hills. View Full Details>>
Lydney Harbour4 miles (6 km)Enjoy a walk along the Lydney Canal and Lydney Harbour on this delightful waterside stroll in Gloucestershire. There's nice views over the River Severn towards Sharpness on the opposite side and the two Severn Bridges further down. It's an idyllic spot with well marked footpaths and lots of birdlife to look out for on the water.
The walk starts from Lydney Train Station on the Dean Forest Heritage Railway. You can catch the old steam train from Lydney Town and then pick up the footpath along the canal to the harbour. It's a pleasant waterside stroll with lovely views across Saniger Sands on the Severn towards the end of the walk.
To extend your walking in the area you can head to the Lydney Park Estate where there are beautiful gardens, woodland trails and a fascinating Roman temple.
Lydney is also located near to the Forest of Dean where there are miles of nice cycling and walking trails to try. The Devil's Pulpit and the Coleford Milkwall and Parkend railway path are two highlights of the area and located not far from Lydney. View Full Details>>
Start Point Devon2 miles (3.5 km)This is a popular circular walk around this beautiful headland on the South Devon coast. It's about a 2 mile walk with great views over Start Bay, a visit to the lighthouse and the option of descending to a delightful secluded beach.
The area is also great for wildlife watching. Look out for marine wildlife such as seals and dolphins, and birds including black-throated divers, gannets, kittiwakes and auks.
Begin the walk from the Start Point car park, near Start Farm. From here it is a short walk along the coast path to the lighthouse. On some days you can enjoy a guided tour here and climb the tower to hear stories about storms, shipwrecks and lighthouse living .
After exploring the lighthouse the walk heads along the coast path to Great Mattiscombe Sand. It is a steep climb down to the beautiful sandy cove where you can look out for Grey seals and basking sharks in the summer. The walk then heads north back to the car park.
It's easy to extend your walk if you have time. You can head west along the South West Coast Path and visit Prawle Point, the southernmost point of Devon. Heading a few miles north will take you to the splendid Slapton Ley Nature Reserve. Here you'll find the largest natural freshwater lake in South West England, a lovely shingle beach and great birdwatching opportunites. View Full Details>>
Bamford Edge4 miles (6 km)Climb to Bamford Edge on this exhilarating walk in the Peak District. The walk is geologically significant with lots of interesting gritstone rock formations to look out for. From the elevated position of Bamford Edge there are simply wonderful views over the surrounding area.
The walk starts from the Derbyshire village of Bamford and climbs on country lanes towards Bole Hill and Bamford Clough. You then head north and pick up the Bamford Edge footpath on Bamford Moor. There are splendid views across the Peak District Hope Valley and down to the lovely Ladybower Reservoir below.
The walk can be extended by continuing to Stanage Edge just east of Bamford Edge. Here you will find a stunning gritstone escarpment of Stanage Edge and the peak of High Neb. From here you can enjoy wonderful views over the Hallam Moors and the Hope Valley.
You could also descend to Ladybower Reservoir and enjoy the woodland trails along the water.
The Derwent Valley Heritage Way runs past Bamford so this is another option. You could follow the riverside path into Hathersage for example. The walk could also be started from Hathersage following the River Derwent to Bamford and then ascending from there.
Just to the west you can enjoy a climb to Win Hill which has some of the best views in the area. View Full Details>>
Lagan Towpath21 miles (34 km)This cycle and walking route follows the towpath of the River Lagan from Belfast to Lisburn along National Cycle Network routes 9 and 93. It's a nice surfaced path making it ideal for families or anyone looking for a safe traffic free ride.
You start off in the centre of Belfast and head south west passing Ormeau Park, Lady Dixon Park and Belvoir Park Forest before coming to the lovely Lagan Valley Regional Park. In this park there are a variety of habitats including wet meadows, ponds, mixed beech woodland and attractive parkland.
After leaving the city centre you continue through the beautiful Lagan Valley, passing the villages of Edenderry and Drumbeg before coming to the city of Lisburn.
This route finishes in Lisburn but if you want to extend your cycling you can continue west along National Cycle route 9 which will take you towards the Down Royal Racecourse and the villages of Halfpenny Gate and Broomhedge in County Antrim. The route eventually reaches the beautiful Lough Neagh. View Full Details>>
Scaleber Force2 miles (3 km)Visit this beautiful waterfall on this short walk from the Yorkshire town of Settle. The waterfall is about a two mile walk from the town, following the Settle Loop along a series of country lanes and tracks. Although a short distance it is quite a challenging route with the waterfall situated in an elevated position above the town. It's a really beautiful spot with the water cascading down several levels to the deep pool below.
The walk starts from Settle near the train station and tourist information centre in the town. You then head south along Mitchell Lane, Lambert Lane and High Hill Lane to Scaleber Bridge. Here you will find a sign pointing you to Scaleber Foss along a public footpath. Climb over the wall and follow the path and you will soon come to the falls. Along the way there's some splendid Yorkshire Dales scenery to enjoy. If you prefer a shorter walk you can just park by the roadside on High Hill Lane and follow the little footpath to the waterfall. View Full Details>>
Worcester Riverside Walk6 miles (9.8 km)An easy riverside walk along the River Severn from Worcester Cathedral to the nearby village of Hallow. The walk is very flat and lasts for just over 6 miles, there and back. It follows a section of the Severn Way long distance trail which runs through the city.
The walk starts next to the cathedral and heads north past Worcester Bridge to Sabrina Bridge. Cross to the western side of the river and follow the Severn Way past the Worcester Racecourse and Northwick to Hallow Park. Follow the trails through the woods to the village of Hallow where you can refresh yourself at the local pub before starting the return journey. View Full Details>>
Glendurgan Garden1 miles (1.5 km)These lovely National Trust owned gardens are located near Falmouth in Cornwall. You can stroll through the gardens on well laid out paths taking you to tranquil ponds, pretty streams, orchards, exotic trees and the fabulous cherry laurel maze. You can also wander down to the end of the garden to the delightful hamlet of Durgan on the Helford River. There's a lovely secluded beach with gorgeous views of the river and out to sea. View Full Details>>
Hardy Monument2 miles (2.5 km)Enjoy wonderful views over the Dorset countryside from this historical viewpoint near Portesham and Abbotsbury. The monument was built in 1844 in memory of Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy, Flag Captain of HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar. This circular walk starts at the National Trust car park next to the monument and takes you over Black Down and through Benecke Wood. The walk can be extended to visit Portesham Hill and the nearby village of Portesham.
If you're coming by bike then you could catch a train to Dorchester and follow National Cycle Network Route 2 to the monument.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could visit the lovely Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens which is only a few miles from the monument. Also nearby is the fascinating Iron Age Hillfort of Maiden Castle. The South Dorset Ridgeway passes the monument and is a great way to explore this section of the Jurassic Coast. View Full Details>>
Purbeck Way15 miles (24 km)This beautiful walk takes you from Wareham to Swanage giving splendid views of the Purbeck Hills and the Dorset coast. The route below uses the South West Cost path and the Purbeck Way to create a super circuit of the area.
The route starts with a lovely waterside stretch along the River Frome from Wareham. You then enter Stoborough Heath where you will pass the Blue Pool - a flooded, disused clay pit. Shortly after you arrive at the pretty village of Corfe Castle with its ruined 10th century castle of the same name. The path then leads you through Corfe Common and onto the stunning Dorset coast where you join the South West Coast Path. The coastal section then takes you past the beautiful Chapman's Pool, through Durlston Country Park to Swanage. From Swanage you continue to Ballard Down where you join the Purbeck Way, crossing the Purbeck Hills to return to Corfe Castle.
The video below left shows the splendid view as you cross the Purbeck Hills from Ballard Down to Corfe Castle. On your right you can see Poole Harbour and Bournemouth, while on your left is Swanage and the Purbeck Hills. On a clear day the Isle of Wight is also clearly visible. View Full Details>>
Peene Quarry Country Park2 miles (4 km)A short circular walk around Peene Quarry in the North Downs. The main attraction here are the spectacular views over Folkestone and the south coast down to Dungeness. This is a fairly challenging route with a steep climb but you are rewarded with stunning views. The walk begins and ends at car park near the Folkestone White Horse but it's also worth visiting the nearby village of Peene. View Full Details>>
Cheddar Reservoir2 miles (3.4 km)Follow the waterside path around this reservoir on this easy circular walk in Somerset. There is a good footpath running around the perimeter with parking available at the south eastern end. It's a lovely spot with sailboats on the water and beautiful countryside and woodland surrounding the water. It's about two miles around the reservoir so it makes for a nice afternoon stroll.
It's easy to extend your walking in the area with the spectacular Cheddar Gorge and the delightful Strawberry Line route nearby.
Just to the west of the reservoir you can climb across Wavering Down on the West Mendip Way and visit the beautiful Crook Peak. From here you can enjoy wonderful views towards the coast and into Wales. View Full Details>>
Wayfarer's Walk71 miles (114 km)Starting at the town of Emsworth on Chichester Harbour, follow this fabulous 70 mile walk through the heart of Hampshire and on into Berkshire.
You will pass through the pretty Hampshire towns and villages of Cheriton, Droxford, Hambledon and New Arlesford while also experiencing the beautiful landscape and wildlife in this special county.
The path is easy to follow as it is waymarked by metal and plastic disks attached to wooden and metal posts.
Highlights on the route in include the National Trust owned Hinton Ampner stately home with its wonderful gardens and Watership Down - the delightful setting for Richard Adams' 1972 novel.
The route passes the wonderful 5000 acre estate surrounding Highclere Castle in Hampshire. The house is famous as the location of period drama 'Downton Abbey'. There are also some lovely waterside stretches to enjoy at Cheriton along the River Itchen and along the River Arle at New Arlesford. The walk finishes at Walbury Hill, the highest point in Berkshire and the South East of England.
Please click here for more information on this walk. View Full Details>>
Jubilee Trail88 miles (142 km)This walk crosses from one side of Dorset to the other, taking you on a tour of some of the county's best scenery and prettiest villages. The Trail runs from Forde Abbey on the Somerset border in the west, across Dorset to Bokerley Dyke on the Hampshire border. You will pass through Winterborne Abbas, Upwey, West Knighton, Crossways, Moreton, Bere Regis, Milton Abbas, Winterborne Stickland, Durweston, Stourpaine, Pimperne, Tarrant Gunville, Chettle and Cranborne.
Route highlights include the lovely Sculpture by the Lakes near Dorchester and Mapperton House in Beaminster. On the border with Hampshire you will find the delightful Martin Down Nature Reserve which has a variety of lovely flora and fauna. View Full Details>>
Orrest Head2 miles (3.4 km)Orrest Head was the first fell climbed by Alfred Wainwright. It inspired him to a 'to a life made happy by fellwandering' so you can expect some wonderful views over lakeland on this fairly easy climb. It's a great walk to do if you're coming in by train as the start of the climb is located right next to Windermere railway station. The walk involves some lovely woodland sections and fabulous views of Lake Windermere, the Old Man of Coniston, Scafell Pike, Great Gable, Fairfield and the Langdale Pikes.
This circular walk begins across the main road from the train station. It climbs steadily to Orrest Head on good footpaths before descending to The Causeway Farm. You then turn south and head to High Hay Wood and Elleray Bank before returning to the start/finish point. View Full Details>>
Woodford Valley8 miles (13 km)Enjoy riverside trails, rolling Wiltshire countryside and views of Stonehenge on this circular walk through the beautiful Woodford Valley.
The walk starts in the town of Amesbury, in the parking area next to the River Avon. Cross the river and then follow the riverside path to Moor Hatches and Normanton where you cross over on the footbridge.
At Normanton head south toward Wilsford Manor before picking up a footpath to Springbottom Farm. Just to the north of here you can visit the Normanton Barrows and the iconic Stonehenge.
Tracks then take you to Lake Bottom, Durnford Mill and Great Durnford. Here you can visit the interesting Norman Church, admire the delightful thatched cottages and enjoy refreshments at the Black Horse pub. The converted mill is also very picturesque with its riverside location and weeping willows.
After passing through Great Dunford the walk continues north through Ham Wood before returning to Amesbury. View Full Details>>
Community Forest Path45 miles (72 km)This is a varied and interesting circular walk taking you on a tour of the countryside, villages and historic estates around Bristol.
The walk starts in Keynsham at the confluence of the River Chew and River Avon and begins with a lovely waterside section along the River Avon before joining the Bristol and Bath Railway Path. You continue to Winterbourne, with a short section along the River Frome, and then through Stoke Gifford to Henubry where you will pass the splendid Blaise Castle Estate. Described as 'the finest place in England' in Jane Austen's novel Northanger Abbey, the estate boasts a 19th century mansion, an 18th century castle, a fascinating Victorian museum and 400 acres of parkland.
From Henbury you continue through the suburbs of Bristol, crossing the River Avon on the Clifton Suspension Bridge next to the beautiful Avon Gorge Nature Reserve. This diverse ancient broad-leaved woodland is home to many rare plants and animals and is well worth exploring. Soon after you arrive at another walk highlight at the Ashton Court Park. Here you will find 850 acres of woodland and meadows including a deer park, mansions and landscaped gardens.
The final section of the walk takes you to Pensford via Dundry Hill, where you will pass the Pensford Railway Viaduct. You then join the River Chew for a delightful waterside section leading you back to Keynsham. View Full Details>>
Lyme Regis to Seaton Undercliff Walk7 miles (11.5 km)Travel from Dorset into Devon on this popular walk through the Undercliff National Nature Reserve. The reserve is one of the highlights on the Jurassic Coast with a wide variety of flora and fauna to look out for.
It's a 7 mile walk with some challenging climbs and wonderful clifftop coastal scenery. The stretch of coast is of high geological significance containing rocks from the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods of geological time. It's also botanically diverse with species rich chalk grassland, holm oak, rhododendron, orchids and laurel.
Starting on the sea front in Lyme Regis you pick up the South West Coast Path and head west past the famous Cobb. The path then climbs to the Ware Cliffs via Chimney Rock. Ware Cliffs have nice lush green vegetation with a high point of 137 metres (449 ft) at Black Ven. The cliffs are thought to be around 199-189 million years old.
You continue west to the lovely Pinhay Bay where there are more tall cliffs and some rugged terrain. The next stage takes you past Whitlands Cliff to Charton Bay, before coming to the splendid Axe Estuary Nature Reserve at Axmouth. It's a great place for birdwatching with many different types of wildfowl and wading birds to look out for.
After crossing the Axe Estuary the walk finishes on the front at Seaton.
You can extend your walking in Seaton by heading north along the Seaton Tramway Walk through the Seaton Marshes to Colyford. The marshes are just north of the town and include ditches and ponds that attract a large variety of wildfowl, waders and butterflies.
If you continue west along the South West Coast Path you will soon come to the villages of Beer and Branscombe. Here you can try the wonderful Branscombe to Beer Walk which takes you past the stunning Hooken Cliffs, Jurassic Coast UNESCO World Heritage Site. View Full Details>>
Wintour's Leap2 miles (4 km)Climb to this magnificent limestone viewpoint on this walk in the Wye Valley. You can start the walk from the south western end of the village of Woodcroft. Follow woodland trails to the quarry and up to the viewpoint. It's a lovely spot with the limestone cliffs and splendid views down to the river below. The crag is a very popular spot for rock climbers with hundreds of routes with several overhangs on the impressive cliffs. After passing Wintour's Leap you can follow the footpath round the river to Lancaut and the remains of St James' Church, once the centre of a medieval village. It's a lovely spot with the church ruins overlooking the river and a plaque describing the history of the abandoned village.
Part of this route uses the Offa's Dyke Path so you could continue along the trail to extend your walk. If you head north you can visit the splendid viewpoint at the Devil's Pulpit. View Full Details>>
St Swithun's Way34 miles (55 km)Follow the St Swithun's Way from Winchester to Farnham on this historical walk through the Hampshire and Surrey countryside. The trail gives the walker the opportunity to visit numerous churches with pilgrimage connections.
The walk begins at the splendid Winchester Cathedral and heads east, through the Itchen Valley towards New Alresford. This opening section includes a long waterside stretch along the River Itchen, passing through the pretty village of Itchen Abbas as you go.
The next section takes you from New Alresford to Alton along country lanes and through a couple of peaceful woodland stretches. You will also pass through the village of Chawton - home to Jane Austen
From Alton you head north-east, following the River Wey through Bentley, before finishing at Farnham in Surrey. Here you can enjoy a visit to Farnham Castle and Farnham Park where there's 320 acres (130 hectares) of hills, valleys, ponds and streams. View Full Details>>
Shanklin to Ventnor Coastal Walk3 miles (5.5 km)This is a popular walk using a lovely section of the Isle of Wight Coast Path to take you between these two seaside resorts. It's a signposted 3.5 mile hike with some moderate hill climbs, a woodland section and fabulous views throughout. Most of the walk is on fairly flat paths but there are some climbs so a reasonable level of fitness is required. You can get the bus back or return the same way if you are feeling energetic!
Starting on the front in Shanklin head south past the popular Shanklin Chine with its lovely beach. The chine is worth further exploration if you have time. In it you will find interesting geological features, a wooded coastal ravine, waterfalls, trees, lush vegetation, and several footpaths and walkways allowing paid access for visitors.
After passing the chine you come to Appley Steps where you begin the steepest climb of the walk. It takes you up towards Luccombe village where there's some spectacular cliffs and scenery.
The route then heads through Bonchurch Landslips where there are some nice woodland trails, more interesting geological formations and sea glimpses through the trees. You'll also pass Old St. Boniface Church which is worth a visit. The nave and chancel dates from the 11th century, with the bell dating from the 16th century.
The final section takes you past Horseshoe Bay and Wheelers Bay before finishing on the front in Ventnor. The popular seaside resort is located to the south of St Boniface Down, the highest point on the island. Ventnor is built on steep slopes leading down to the sea and enjoys a microclimate which allows sub tropical plants to flourish. Visit the Ventnor Botanic Garden to see examples.
You can extend the walk by continuing west along the coast to St Lawrence and St Catherine's Lighthouse, the most southerly point on the Isle of Wight.
Above Ventnor you can climb to the Ventnor Downs, the highest point on the island. There's fabulous views, wildflowers, heather and New Forest Ponies to be seen on St Boniface Down. View Full Details>>
Sussex Border Path137 miles (220 km)A fabulous long distance walk following the Sussex county border from Thorney Island in West Sussex to Rye in East Sussex.
You begin on Thorney Island with a lovely section along the coast from Emsworth. The route then heads through the South Downs to South Harting and Liphook before continuing to Gospel Green, Rudgwick, Gatwick Airport, Horley and East Grinstead. You then head through the beautiful High Weald, passing Groombridge, Bewl Water and Northiam before finishing in Rye. The walk is well waymarked throughout.
Route highlights include a climb to the highest point on the South Downs at Black Down in West Sussex. You'll also visit the lovely Weir Wood Reservoir and the interesting Bodiam Castle. View Full Details>>
Bath Skyline Walk6 miles (9 km)Enjoy wonderful views of the city of Bath on this popular circular walk. The walk has been devised by the National Trust so takes place on waymarked, well maintained footpaths.
The walk begins on Bathwick Hill and then heads south to Widcombe passing Smallcombe Wood. The wood is an excellent place for birdwatching with nuthatch, wrens and blackcap to look out for. The route continues past the stunning Prior Park with its beautiful lakes and Palladian Bridge. You then cross Claverton Down before turning north towards Claverton where you will find the excellent American musuem. The path continues north towards Bathampton where there is a nice woodland section through Bathampton Woods. You then turn south through more woodland to Sham Castle, an 18th-century folly which makes a good spot to rest and enjoy the wonderful views. The final section takes you from the castle to Bathwick Hill and the finish point. It's a splendid walk with varied scenery and consistently wonderful views over Bath towards the Mendip Hills.
At Bathampton you can pick up the Kennet and Avon Canal and try the Bath to Bradford Upon Avon Canal Walk. The route will take you from Somerset into Wiltshire along the towpath of the canal. View Full Details>>
Sidmouth to Beer7 miles (12 km)This walk follows a section of the wonderful Jurassic Coast from the town of Sidmouth to the village of Beer in Devon. It's a popular coastal walk running for about 8 miles along an undulating path. There's lovely cliff top views, attractive beaches and interesting geological features to see on the path. Also look out for Exmoor Ponies on the way!
Starting on the front in Sidmouth head east, crossing the River Sid. You then pass the lovely Salcombe Hill Cliffs and Chapman's Rocks before coming to Dunscombe Cliffs. You may see Exmoor Ponies and lots of butterflies fluttering around the wide variety of wildflowers you can find in this area.
The route continues past Salcombe Regis to Weston Mouth, an isolated shingle beach which can be reached by a footpath. Shortly after you come to the popular village of Branscombe where there's a nice beach and three National Trust properties; The Old Bakery, Manor Mill & Forge.
You continue to Beer passing the photogenic Hooken Cliffs. A slump in the Chalk cliffs in 1790 separated a 10-acre tract of land, now a wooded and sheltered habitat with chalk pinnacles on the seaward side. It's reached via a steep footpath leading from the clifftop to Branscombe Beach. The route finishes in the pretty seaside village of Beer, where there are lovely views over Seaton Bay and Lyme Bay with a nice shingle beach and lots of fishing boats.   View Full Details>>
Calf Hey Reservoir2 miles (2.5 km)The attractive area of Haslingden Grane includes some nice walking trails around Calf Hey Reservoir and through the adjacent woodland. There's a car park off Calf Hey Road at the north eastern end of reservoir. From here you can pick up public footpaths around the water and through the surrounding woodland.
The Rossendale Way long distance trail runs through the area so you could pick this up to extend your walk. You can pick it up and head east towards Ogden and Holden Wood Reservoir.
You could also climb south from the reservoir to Musbery Heights where there are splendid views back down to the water. View Full Details>>
Agglestone Rock3 miles (5.3 km)This walk takes you across the Godlingston Heath Nature Reserve to the prominent sandstone block of Agglestone Rock. The walk crosses Black Down which rises some 300ft above sea level. As such it is a moderately challenging walk with the reward of fantastic views towards the coast for much of the way. Look out for wildlife including wild horses and possibly deer.
The walk starts at Middle Beach in Studland where there is ample parking. From here you follow Beach Road round to the Studland Store and then cross the main road. Walk up Heath Green Road and then turn right onto Agglestone Road and you will soon come to the heath where you can pick up the footpaths.
Head south west along the paths to Fishing Barrow which climbs to a height of nearly 400ft. Here you turn right and continue towards Agglestone Rock. There's splendid views across the heath to Studland Bay and Poole Harbour as you go. You can see the view from the rock using the Google Street View link below.
After admiring the impressive rock the walk descends to Knowl Hill before crossing the eastern edge of the heath and returning to the car park. View Full Details>>
Shepton Mallet5 miles (8 km)Visit the Charlton viaduct and the village of Doulting on this circular walk in the Somerset town of Shepton Mallet.
Just to the north of the town you can pick up the East Mendip Way on Barren Down. Then follow the path east to the Charlton Viaduct. This section passes close to Kilver Court where there are some splendid gardens with hostas, day lilies and candelabra primula next to the River Sheppey.
From the viaduct the route climbs towards Ingsdons Hill which reaches a height of over 700ft. You then descend to Chelynch passing Pitts Wood on the way. From here you turn south to the little village of Doulting. The spring in Doulton is the source of the River Sheppey and named after St Aldhelm who died in the village in 709. The village also includes a tithe barn which dates from the 15th century.
The final section of the walk follows a public footpath along the River Sheppey, returning you to the viaduct. View Full Details>>
Dulwich Woods2 miles (2.5 km)Explore Dulwich Woods and Sydenham Woods on this easy stroll in south east London. The ancient woods include several footpaths and over 200 species of trees and flowering plants. These include wild garlic, bluebell, dog violet, wood anemone, bugle, Chilean pine, oak and hornbeam. Also look out for remnants of Victorian gardens including an old Victorian folly.
The walk starts from Sydenham Hill railway station, just to the west of the woods. Cross College Road and then you can pick up the footpath leading into the southern section of Dulwich Woods. The paths then lead north east, taking you past the golf club into Sydenham Hill Wood.
The area is also a nature reserve so look out for a variety of wildlife as you make your way along the trails. Birds include nuthatch, treecreeper, tawny owl, kestrel and sparrowhawk. Also keep your eyes peeled for butterflies such as purple hairstreak, white-letter hairstreak and speckled wood.
In the northern section of the woods is a small pond. You may see frogs, newts, dragonflies and damselflies here.
The Green Chain Walk long distance trail passes through the woods. To extend your walk you could follow the trail north west to Dulwich Park. It's a pretty park with nice surfaced footpaths, a cafe, a boating lake and recumbent bicycle hire.
If you were to follow the Green Chain Walk south it would take you into Crystal Palace Park. Here you can enjoy tree lined paths, a maze, lakes and views towards London from the high points. You can also pick up the Capital Ring trail and further explore the area on foot.
Brockwell Park is only about 1.5 miles to the north west. There's some nice cycling and walking trails surrounding the 19th century Brockwell Hall here. View Full Details>>
Wellington Monument1 miles (1.6 km)Enjoy a climb up Wellington Hill and visit the monument created to commemorate the Duke of Wellington's victory at the Battle of Waterloo. The noteworthy site is one of the main features of the Blackdown Hills AONB in Somerset. There's great views from the hill summit and a number of woodland trails to enjoy too.
Start your walk from the Wellington Monument car park, at Hemyock Place. From here you can pick up a lovely, beech lined woodland trail up to the monument. The obelisk stands at a height of 175 ft (53 m) and is one of the tallest of its kind in Britain. It's surrounded by an attractive area of grassland where you can see various wildflowers in the summer months. There's also a wide variety of birds and butterflies to look out for here too.
Wellington Hill is located just to the east of Culmstock Beacon and Black Down Common. You can extend your walk by heading up to the beacon for more great views over the Somerset and Devon countryside. View Full Details>>
Porth Reservoir3 miles (5 km)Enjoy a circular walk around this pretty reservoir near Newquay. You'll find a nature trail, bird hides and a visitor centre with information on the area. There's also an impressive dam, boardwalks, and woodland to enjoy. This walk starts at the parking area and takes you around the reservoir on footpaths and country lanes. If you're coming by bike you can reach the reservoir by riding east on National Cylcle Route 32 from Newquay.
For nice views down to the reservoir you can try the Colan Woods Walk which takes you along the country lanes and footpaths above the reservoir. View Full Details>>
Mount Caburn4 miles (7 km)This walk visits the delightful Mount Caburn Nature Reserve in the South Downs. You can reach the reserve by following a footpath from the centre of Lewes. It's just over 2 miles to the reserve from the town with the route crossing the River Ouse before passing Malling Down Nature Reserve, Ranscombe Camp hill, Oxteddle Bottom and Caburn Bottom.
The reserve consists of managed chalk downland and a Bronze Age hill fort. There is also a wide variety of flora and fauna to look out for. This includes the largest British population of burnt-tip orchid and pyramidal orchids. There are also many different types of wildflowers such as Sweet briar, Marjoram and the bright yellow horseshoe vetch. These attract various butterflies including Adonis, chalkhill blue butterfly and silver-spotted skippers. It's also great for bird watching with Skylarks, meadow pipits, yellowhammers, corn bunting, kestrels, peregrine falcon and buzzards to look out for.
The summit of Mount Caburn stands at 480-feet (146m) and consists of an Iron Age Hill Fort. There are wonderful views of Lewes, Glynde, Firle and the South Downs to enjoy.
After climbing the hill you could visit the delightful Little Cottage Tea Rooms and enjoy a cream tea. The tea rooms are located just to the south of the reserve on Ranscombe Lane.
A shorter, alternative route to the reserve is to start from Glynde Bridge. There is a train station and parking area about a mile from the hill.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby Firle Beacon. It is located just a few miles to the south east and offers great views over the Weald towards the south coast.
A few miles to the north you can visit the delightful Barcombe Mills where there are lovely waterside walks along the River Ouse and Barcombe Reservoir. View Full Details>>
Masham4 miles (7 km)A circular walk exploring the countryside and rivers around the small town of Masham in North Yorkshire. The walk includes lovely riverside stretches along the River Burn and the River Ure. You'll also pass close to the Swinton Estate with its deer park and expansive parkland.
The route starts in the town centre which includes a nice Market Place and some fine Georgian architecture. You head east from the town to the River Ure, where you pick up a nice riverside footpath. After about half a mile you turn west to pick up a trail along the River Burn. The river passes close to the village of Swinton which includes Swinton Park. The country house is now a hotel set in 200 acres of parkland, lakes and gardens. You can visit the estate, explore the beautiful gardens and watch out for the resident fallow deer.
The walk continues past Swinton Moor before picking up a section of the Ripon Rowel long distance trail. You follow the waymarked trail through the countryside to return to the town.
To extend your walking around Masham follow footpaths north from the town to the nearby Marfield Wetlands Nature Reserve. The peaceful reserve is home to a variety of species of bird and includes several ponds located next to the River Ure.
Other walks in the area include the splendid climb to the fascinating Druids Temple. You can follow the Ripon Rowel from the town to the site, where you will find an early 19th century replica of Stonehenge surrounded by attractive woodland.
Also near the town is Leighton Reservoir and Roundhill Reservoir. These bodies of water are also located to the west of the town near the Druids Temple. View Full Details>>
Lewes6 miles (9 km)This circular walk around the county town of East Sussex includes riverside paths, lovely views of the South Downs and a visit to Lewes Castle. The attractive town is located a few miles north east of Brighton, in a pretty area of the South Downs. As such there's several good options for walkers with some good hill climbs and waterside walks along the River Ouse to enjoy.
This walk starts at the 11th century castle and heads east along the High Street to the river. Here you pick up the Sussex Ouse Valley Way to take you north along the River Ouse to South Malling and Offham. This section runs past the Offham Marshes Site of Special Scientific Interest  where you can look out for birds such as mallards, mute swans, grey herons and moorhens. After passing through Offham you turn south to pick up a section of the Greenwich Meridian Trail which leads you through the countryside and back to the town.
To continue the walk you could follow the river in a southerly direction and visit the village of Rodmell. Here you can pick up the South Downs Way long distance trail.
One of the higlights of the area is the nearby Mount Caburn. Here you will find a lovely nature reserve and wonderful views from the 480-feet (146m) hill summit.
Another good option is to follow the Sussex Ouse Valley Way in a north easterly direction to Barcombe Mills. Here you can enjoy waterside trails, a small reservoir and a delightful riverside pub.
Another major highlight of the area is the climb to Firle Beacon. Near here you can also visit Charleston, the delightful home and country meeting place for the writers, painters and intellectuals known as the Bloomsbury group.
Heading east from the town will take you past the Malling Down Nature Reserve to Glyndebourne. The English country house, is also the site of an opera house that, since 1934, has been the venue for the annual Glyndebourne Festival Opera. View Full Details>>
Gara Point Yealm Estuary3 miles (5.5 km)This circular coastal walk near Newton Ferrers visits Gara Point with wonderful views over the Yealm Estuary.
The walk starts from the National Trust car park at Warren and follows the South West Coast Path to Gara Point, passing Blackstone Point SSI on the way. It's a lovely spot with wildflowers, green fields, gorse and wonderful views to Wembury Bay, Plymouth Sound and the Mewstone. From Gara Point you head towards Cellar Beach which you can visit by climbing down some steps. You then start a short woodland section through the Brakehill Plantation, a 19th-century woodland of ash, chestnut, sycamore, beech and oaks. You continue through more woodland towards Noss Mayo with great views over the Yealm River and Newton Ferrers. The final section heads inland through the countryside on a mixture of country lanes and footpaths, returning you to the car park.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby Wembury Point. View Full Details>>
Cotswold Way102 miles (164 km)This trail takes you through some of the most beautiful countryside in England.
It runs for just over 100 miles from Chipping Campden in Gloucestershire to the historic city of Bath in Somerset.
As well as proffering wonderful views of the Cotswold Hills Area of Outstanding Beauty, you can also see the River Severn, the Black Mountains of Wales and the Forest of Dean from the route.
You will pass through or near a series of attractive market towns such as Chipping Sodbury, Wooton-under-Edge, Stroud and Cheltenham before arriving at the splendid Roman city of Bath at the end of the trail. View Full Details>>
Old Harry Rocks4 miles (6 km)This circular walk visits the local landmark of Old Harry Rocks on the Dorset coast, near Studland. It's a popular walk with wonderful views towards Sandbanks, Poole Harbour and the Isle of Wight.
The three striking chalk formations mark the most easterly point of the Jurassic Coast. The rocks are thought to be named after Harry Paye, the infamous Poole pirate. His ship would lay in wait for passing merchant ships, using the rocks as cover.
You can park at the South Beach car park in Studland to start your walk. From here you pick up a nice flat footpath along the South West Coast Path to take you to the rocks. It's about a one mile stroll from the parking area to the rocks, with a seated viewpoint along the way. The path passes through chalk grassland with lots of pretty wildflowers to look out for in the summer months.
From the rocks you can then climb towards Ballard Point where you pick up a section of the Purbeck Way to take you across Ballard Down. You then descend back into Studland on a country lane, passing the Glebeland Estate. The route then heads to the pretty Norman Church of St Nicholas which dates from the 12th century, although there has been a church on this site from Saxon times. You can follow a public footpath through the church grounds which leads you back to the car park.
At the end of your walk you can enjoy refreshments at the Bankes Arms pub on Manor Road. It has a great beer garden overlooking Studland Bay.
To extend your walking in the area you could head north and explore the lovely Studland Heath Nature Reserve. Here you will find way marked trails taking you through sand dunes and heathland with a variety of wildlife to look out for. The heath leads into Godlingstone Heath where you can visit the impressive Agglestone Rock. The large sandstone block sits in an elevated position and commands wonderful views across the heaths to the coast.
Continuing west along the Purbeck Way from Ballard Down will take you to the village of Corfe Castle with its ruined castle and pretty cottages.
You can virtually explore the area around Old Harry by clicking on the Google Street View link below. View Full Details>>
Guildford20 miles (32 km)The town of Guildford has a huge selection of walks to choose from with several long distance trails, hill climbs, parks, rivers and canals to explore.
This long circular walk makes use of some of the waymarked footpaths running through the area, showcasing the best of the surrounding North Downs countryside. You'll follow sections of the Fox Way, North Downs Way, Wey South Path and Downs Link long distance trails on this 20 mile tour of the area.
The route starts in the town centre, near the castle. From here you can pick up the Wey South Path and follow the River Wey to Shalford Park. You then pick up the North Downs Way and head east towards St Martha's Hill, passing Pewley Down on the way. From the St Martha's Hill viewpoint there are tremendous views over Newlands Corner and the surrounding Surrey Hills.
The walk then descends past the 17th century Chilworth Manor to Blackheath Common. The 250 acre common consists of lowland heathland, woodland and acid grassland. Look out for pretty heather in the autumn months.
At the common the route turns west, following a section of the Downs Link to Chinthurst Hill and Bramley. Here you link up with the Fox Way which takes you to Farley Hill before coming to Godalming. There's a nice waterside section along the River Wey Navigation Canal to enjoy here.
After leaving the canal the trail continues through Upper and Lower Eashing before passing through Shackleford Heath. You then skirt the edge of Puttenham Common where there's miles of good walking trails and two large ponds.
The route then bends round to the east, passing Puttenham, Compton, Littleton and Loseley Park. The park has a series of splendid gardens and attractive grounds surrounding Loseley House.
Shortly after Littleton you return to the River Wey for a final waterside section to take you back into Guildford. View Full Details>>
St Mawes to St Just2 miles (4 km)This walk takes you along a lovely stretch of coast on the Roseland Peninsula in Cornwall. It's about a 2.5 mile walk from the town of St Mawes to the village of St Just, with splendid views over Carrick Roads.
The walk starts from St Mawes Castle. The artillery fort was constructed by Henry VIII between 1540 and 1542. It's an impressive sight with grounds stretching down to the waters of the Fal Estuary and great views across to Pendennis Castle in Falmouth. After exploring the castle you follow the coast path north to St Just in Roseland. The little village is well know for its 13th-century church and beautiful riverside gardens.
To extend your walking in the area you can visit St Anthony Head Lighthouse and enjoy lovely views back towards St Mawes. Also nearby is the popular town of Falmouth where you can enjoy another great coastal walk to Pendennis Castle and the lovely Swanpool Nature Reserve. You can catch a regular ferry from St Mawes to Falmouth in the summer months. The long distance South West Coast Path also runs through the area. View Full Details>>
Sharkham Point Nature Reserve1 miles (1.5 km)Enjoy a short circular walk around this delightful coastal nature reserve in Brixham, Devon.
The reserve has a good sized parking area at the end of St Mary's Road in Higher Brixham. From here you can pick up the footpaths to take you to Sharkham Point and along the coastal headland. It's a great viewpoint with nice views down to St Mary's beach and along the coast. The area is fantastic for wildlife watching with ospreys in the skies above and dolphins in the beautiful turquoise waters below.
To extend your walk follow the South West Coast Path north around St Mary's Bay to the splendid Berry Head Country Park. Here you can see a wide variety of coastal plantlife and a large Guillemot colony. View Full Details>>
Cambridge to Grantchester3 miles (5.5 km)This is a popular riverside walk from Cambridge to the nearby village of Grantchester. It takes you along the River Cam with lovely views of Grantchester Meadows and the surrounding countryside.  It's now a tradition for university students to punt to Grantchester for breakfast during the May Balls so you should see lots of little boats along the way.
The walk starts in the centre of Cambridge near the tourist information centre. You then follow paths to the famous Cambridge Backs where you can enjoy nice views of some of the University colleges. The walk continues south through Sheep's Green and Coe Fen Nature Reserve. Considering it closeness to the city it's a delightfully pastoral scene with cows and sheep grazing next to the meandering river.
You continue south through the pretty Paradise Nature Reserve where there are some peaceful woodland trails. The route then follows Grantchester Meadows Road away from the river before heading across Skater's Meadow to return to the Cam. You then follow the riverside path past Eight Acre Wood before turning towards the village of Grantchester. Here you can enjoy a cream tea at the delightful Orchard Tea Room. It's an idyllic setting with outdoor seating amongst the fruit trees. After refreshments you can either catch a bus back to Cambridge or follow the same route back on foot.
If you enjoy this walk you could try the Fen Rivers Way long distance trail. It will take you along the Cam in the other direction, towards the lovely Milton Country Park. View Full Details>>
Grasmere5 miles (8 km)This circular walk from the popular village of Grasmere visits several Lake District highlights. You'll visit Grasmere Lake, Rydal Water, Rydal Hall and Wordsworth's Dove Cottage on this walk which runs for just over 5 miles.
The walk starts in the centre of Grasmere where you can visit the grave of poet William Wordsworth who is buried in the churchyard of St. Oswald's Church. Right next to the church is the famous Grasmere Gingerbread Shop where you can expect a long queue in the holiday months! From the church you can follow Red Bank Country Lane past the Garden Centre to the lake. The lane bends round the western side of the lake, passing the lakeside Faeryland tea rooms where you can also hire little boats to take out on the lake.
Eventually you will come to a footpath heading down to the lake on your left. You can then follow a lovely lakeside path or climb up to Loughrigg Terrace for great views down to the lake. There's also the option here to head south and climb to Loughrigg Fell for wide ranging views of the nearby lakes and fells. At the eastern end of the lake there is a nice little beach where you will often see people relaxing on a summer's day.
The route continues east towards Rydal Water where you can drop down to the lakeside path. At the eastern end of the water you pass through woodland before crossing the River Rothay to take you up to Rydal Hall. The Grade II listed house is well worth exploring. There's lovely formal gardens with a fountain, a nice cafe next to Rydal Beck and a waterfall with a viewing platform. It's a good spot to stop for refreshments with outdoor seating next to the beck.
From Rydal Hall you pick up a section of the Coffin Route. The old path runs from Ambleside to Grasmere and is so called because it was used to convey coffins on their final journey to St Oswalds Church in Grasmere. You follow it west past Nab Scar to Town End where you will find Dove Cottage, the home of poet William Wordsworth from 1799 to 1808.  During this period, William wrote much of the poetry for which he is remembered today, including 'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud'. You can explore the fascinating old house and then browse the adjacent museum where you will find exhibits, manuscripts, landscapes and portraits.
The final section of the walk takes you back to the village, passing a series of pretty shops and galleries on the way. View Full Details>>
Stonehenge2 miles (4 km)This circular walk visits the countryside and woodland around this famous historical site. It's an atmospheric and beautiful area with great views across the fields of Salisbury Plain.
The route starts from the car park and visits the Avenue, a 1.5 mile long bank and ditch earthwork thought to be the ceremonial route and entrance to the stone circle. This leads to the Bronze Age burial mounds at King Barrow Ridge. This is a nice spot with ancient Beech trees and nice views across the area from the elevated position of the barrows.
The walk also visits the fascinating Stonehenge Cursus. This large Neolithic cursus monument was constructed several hundred years before the earliest phase of Stonehenge in 3000 BC. To explore the Stonehenge site itself you will need to purchase a ticket from English Heritage. The area around the cursus is on open access land so can be visited for free. View Full Details>>
Imber Range Perimeter Path30 miles (48 km)This circular walking path takes you around the perimeter of a military training firing range located on Salisbury Plain. It's an interesting landscape with oceans of chalk grassland and a fascinating prehistoric history.
It starts and ends near Westbury and passes through Tilshead, Chitterne and the outskirts of Warminster. Points of interest include the National Trust's White Barrow - a large Neolithic long barrow near Tilshead and the Westbury White Horse on the Salisbury Plain escarpment dating from 1778. You will also pass the MOD's urban warfare training centre at Copehill Down near Chitterne. The unusual site was constructed in 1988 to resemble a Bavarian German village, providing troops with a simulated backdrop when training for European operations.
There's much to enjoy on this walk, including terrific views across Salisbury Plain and the Wiltshire and Somerset countryside. Wild orchids and wide variety of birdlife are also common in the summer months. View Full Details>>
South Dorset Ridgeway17 miles (27 km)Enjoy wonderful views of the Jurassic Coast on this walk along the South Dorset Ridgeway. The route runs along the South West Coast Path from West Bexington to Osmington Mills with some beautiful scenery to enjoy. The area is also historically significant with several Bronze Age round barrows and Iron Age hill forts to look out for on the way. The immediate area contains about 500 archaeological monuments, nearly all of them several thousand years old. It's quite a challenging walk with several climbs, reaching a maximum height of nearly 800ft. From the elevated position of the path there are splendid coastal views to enjoy for most of the route.
The walk starts in the village of West Bexington on the Dorset coast near Chesil Beach. You then climb away from the coast to the Hardy Monument, passing Abbotsbury Castle Iron Age Hill Fort and the Hell Stone neolithic dolmen on Portesham Hill. The Hardy monument was built in 1844 in memory of Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy, Flag Captain of HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar. It sits on Black Down and commands fine views to the coast.
The path continues east, descending towards the village of Bincombe across Bincombe Down. Soon after you come to Chalbury Hill Fort and the Osmington White Horse. The distinctive figure is one of the highlights of the walk. It dates from the early 19th century and represents King George III riding his horse.
From the white horse you descend to the village of Osmington. It's an interesting place with a church dating from the 12th century and dwellings dating back to the 16th century. The final section of the walk takes you from Osmington to the little hamlet of Osmington Mills on the coast. There's nice views of Osmington Bay as you finish your walk.
If you wanted to extend your walk you could continue east along the coast and visit the beautiful Ringstead Bay. View Full Details>>
Rossendale Way41 miles (66 km)This circular walk takes you on a tour of the lovely Rossendale area of Lancashire and Greater Manchester.
The path passes Haslingden, Whitworth, Stubbins and Healey with a series of attractive reservoirs including Cowpe and Calf Hey real highlights. Near Calf Hey you'll cross Holcombe Moor where you'll pass the Peel Tower. The distinctive monument is dedicated to Sir Robert Peel, the 19th century Prime Minister considered the father of modern British policing. It's a major local landmark and worth the climb to the top for the views over the area.
The walk also takes you through the delightful Healey Dell Nature Reserve with waterfalls and wildlife to enjoy here. The views of the South Pennine hills are also splendid and make a fine backdrop to the walk. View Full Details>>
Buttermere4 miles (7 km)This is a fine circular walk around the beautiful Buttermere lake in the Lake District National Park. The lake has a delightful walking path running along most of the shoreline making for an idyllic waterside stroll. It's one the most popular and scenic areas of the Lake District with the lake surrounded by several fells. Look out for the High Stile range to the south west, Robinson to the north east, Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks to the south east and Grasmoor to the north west.
You start off in the pretty village of Buttermere which takes its name from the lake. The village contains several Grade II listed farmhouses and barns dating from the 16th and 17th centuries.
It's a short stroll south from the village centre to the lake. You then pick up the shoreline trail passing through a rock tunnel beneath Hassness on the way round. The fells of Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks make a tremendous backdrop to the walk. View Full Details>>
Redmires Reservoir2 miles (4 km)Enjoy a circular walk around these reservoirs located near Sheffield on the edge of the Peak District. You can start from the car park at the north western corner of the upper reservoir. The trails then take you around the middle and lower reservoir with some climbs into the surrounding moors. From the high points there are fabulous views back down to the reservoirs. There is also a woodland section through the Redmires Plantation towards the end of the route. Look out for a wide variety of wildfowl and waders on the water.
To extend your walking in the area you could visit the nearby Rivelin Dams and pick up the splendid Rivelin Valley Nature Trail. Also nearby is the delightful Wyming Brook Nature Reserve. This is located near the Redmires Plantation and includes a nice walking trail along the Wyming Brook.
Just to the west is Stanedge Pole and Stanage Edge. You can take a detour at the southern end of the upper reservoir to climb to Stanedge Pole. The pole stands at a height of 438 metres (1,437 feet) and marks the border between Derbyshire and South Yorkshire. If you continue your climb you will come to the stunning gritstone escarpment of Stanage Edge and the peak of High Neb. From here you can enjoy wonderful views over the Hallam Moors and the Hope Valley.
This route is designed for walkers but cyclists can also enjoy the sections along the quiet Redmires Road which give great views over the water. You can virtually explore this area on the google street view link below. View Full Details>>
Derwent Edge8 miles (13 km)Climb to this wonderful Millstone Grit escarpment and enjoy fabulous views back down to the numerous beautiful reservoirs below. It's a challenging circular walk climbing to a height of over 1700ft around Back Tor. You will be rewarded with stunning far reaching views over the Peak District.
The area is also full of interesting flora and fauna. Look out for rare plants such as common cottongrass, mountain strawberry and crowberry. Wildlife includes Eurasian golden plover, red grouse, ring ouzel and mountain hare.
The walk starts from the Fairholmes car park in between Ladybower Reservoir and Derwent Reservoir. Here you will find a great visitor centre which makes an excellent base for exploring the Derwent Valley.
The trail heads north along Derwent Reservoir towards the impressive Derwent Dam. Just after Abbey Bank you turn east and start the climb to Lost Lad Hill, crossing Little Howden Moor and Greystones Moss. At the summit of Lost Lad there's a toposcope showing the surrounding hills. You can also see up to Back Tor, the next destination on the walk. From here there are fabulous views over the reservoirs below, Stanage Edge and the Kinder Plateau.
From Back Tor you head south to Dovestone Tor and along the fantastic ridge path towards Derwent Edge. Around here there are some wonderful geological formations including the impresive Salt Cellar stone. It has a striking resemblance to a certain condiment holder! Even more impressive are the Wheel Stones (or Coach and Horses) which resemble a coach and horses on the horizon when viewed from the A57 road to the south.
Shortly after passing the Wheel Stones you turn west and descend back to Ladybower Reservoir. The final section takes you along the water back to the car park. The visitor centre has a good cafe where you can refresh yourself after your adventure.
To extend your walking in the area you can follow the waterside trail along Ladybower Reservoir and visit Lower Ladybower Reservoir.
If you are interested in more exhilarating climbs then look no further than Stanage Edge and Bamford Edge which are both nearby. For geology enthusiasts Alport Castles with its spectacular formation of rocks, is a must see. View Full Details>>
Helsby Hill1 miles (2 km)Enjoy a climb to Helsby Hill Fort on this short circular walk in Cheshire. The hill is one of the notable landmarks of the area, standing over 450ft above the village of Helsby below. From the summit there are splendid views over the Mersey Estuary, the city of Liverpool and into Wales.
You can start your walk from the Helsby Quarry car park off Alvanley Road, about 1 mile to the south of the hill summit. Then head north, crossing the road before picking up the woodland trails towards the hill top. Here you pick up a section of the North Cheshire Way to take you to the edge of the woodland, before turning around and picking up the Middle Walk trail to take you back down the hill.
Several long distance trails pass Helsby Hill so you can pick any of these up to extend your walk. For example you could follow the Longster Trail south to Harmer's Wood and then on to the pretty Manly Mere where there is an adventure trail to try.
The Sandstone Trail runs just to the east of Helsby. On this trail you can climb to the nearby Woodhouses Hill Fort and then on to Frodsham Hill near Overton. Here you can also link up with the Delamere Way and follow it south east to the expansive Delamere Forest.
The Longster Trail starts on Helsby Hill so this is another good option. The long distance path runs from Helsby to Chester via the villages of Great Barrow and Guilden Sutton. View Full Details>>
Loxwood Canal4 miles (5.7 km)A circular walk along an idyllic section of the Wey & Arun Canal on the Surrey/West Sussex border. It's a particularly delightful area with pretty locks, old bridges, an aqueduct and views of the River Lox, which runs alongside the canal.
The walk starts in the little village of Loxwood, in the Chichester district of West Sussex. Head east along the towpath and you will soon come to the lovely Brewhurst Lock and Bridge.
The next section takes you to Drungewick Aqueduct, another photogenic spot on the route. It's surrounded by some beautiful West Sussex countryside and a special place in the summer months.
The route then heads south down Drungewick Lane, before heading through the woodland and countryside to the south of the canal. After your walk you can enjoy refreshments in the Onslow Arms with its lovely beer garden overlooking the canal.
The route uses a section of the long distance Wey South Path. You can extend your exercise by heading north along the path to Sydney Wood. Heading south takes you to Billinghurst. View Full Details>>
Yarmouth to Freshwater Bay3 miles (5.5 km)Cross the western side of the Isle of Wight from north to south on the Freshwater Way trail. It's a 3.5 mile walk taking place on generally flat paths along the pretty estuary of the River Yar.
The walk starts in Yarmouth near to the main parking area and the tourist information centre. Follow the path west over Yar Bridge with nice views of the boats in the harbour. At Norton Spit, turn south and follow the path to Kings Manor Farm. Just before you reach the farm you have the option of taking a detour and heading west to Norton Green and Golden Hill Country Park. There's some nice woodland trails and attractive parkland surrounding a former Victorian fort.
The final section of the walk heads through Easton before finishing at Freshwater Bay where there is a nice beach and cliff views.
Around Afton Manor the path splits to give and alternative route heading to Afton Down and Compton Bay. This section involves more climbing so a reasonable level of fitness is required.
The Isle of Wight Coast Path is directly accessible at either end of the route. You can pick up the coastal trail to further explore the island. Just to the east you can also pick up the Hamstead Trail and Tennyson Trail. View Full Details>>
Tollymore Forest Park6 miles (10 km)Enjoy miles of woodland trails and a waterside stroll along the beautiful Shimna River on this circular walk in the Mourne Mountains. There are 1,600 acres to explore with the park surrounded by mountains and located close to the coastal town of Newcastle in County Down. In the park there are four colour code trails to follow of varying lengths. The trails are all signposted and visit the arboretum, the Shimna River and the two forested hills known as the Drinns.
This walk starts from the car park near Bryansford and passes along the river with its series of pretty bridges, rocky outcrops and waterfalls. One of the bridges dates from the early 18th century.
The walk then passes along a series of woodland trails with a variety of interesting trees such as monkey puzzle, eucalyptus and impressive giant redwoods. There are also some viewpoints to climb where you can enjoy fantastic views over the surrounding area. From the Curraghard viewpoint in the south eastern corner of the park there are views over the Northern Mournes, Dundrum Bay, Newcastle and the Irish Sea.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could climb the nearby Slieve Donard.
Also nearby is the splendid Murlough Bay National Nature Reserve where there is a beautiful sand dune system, woodland trails and a wonderful beach.
At Rostrevor you will find the excellent Kilbroney Forest Park where there are some great mountain bike trails and walks to Slieve Martin. View Full Details>>
The Long Walk Windsor Castle9 miles (14 km)This route in Windsor Great Park takes you along the famous 'Long Walk' to Windsor Castle. The path was laid out by King Charles II and the planting of its trees completed by William of Orange in the 1680s. You can walk the length of the tree lined path which runs from the castle to Snow Hill at a distance of 2.65 miles (4.26 km). Along the way you can look out for the resident Red Deer which are often seen in the area.
The walk starts in the Savill Garden car park and takes you to Cumberland Lodge where you pick up the Three Castles Walk. Follow the long distance trail up to Snow Hill and the Copper Horse statue which marks the start of the Long Walk. The statue is of George III on horseback, and is said to represent the king as an emperor in the Roman tradition. From the elevated position of the hill there is a splendid view down the Long Walk to the castle.
The path then descends to the Prince of Wales Pond and the Rush Pond before passing Doubles Gate and the Long Walk gate. Shortly after you come to the castle which is a royal residence founded by William the Conqueror in the 11th century. The castle is open to the public all year round and includes nice footpaths around the pretty gardens. View Full Details>>
Wessex Ridgeway137 miles (221 km)This wonderful trail runs from Marlborough in Wiltshire to Lyme Regis on the Jurassic Coast in Dorset. You will pass:
- Overton Down
- The mystical Avebury Stones
- The White Horse at Bratton
- Wardour Castle ruins
- Ibberton Hill with splendid views
-The Vale of Pewsey
- Salisbury Plain
- Pilsdon Pen - with panoramic views of Marshwood Vale
- Cerne Abbas Giant - the mysterious figure on Giant Hill in Dorset thought to have been created in the 17th century
- Win Green Hill, the highest point in the Cranborne Chase AONB
-Bulbarrow Hill - this Iron Age Hill fort near Blandform Forum command wonderful views over Blackmore Vale.
Roundway Hill - the site of a 1643 Civil War battle, also includes the Oliver's Castle Iron Age Hillfort. View Full Details>>
Uplyme to Lyme Regis2 miles (2.6 km)Enjoy a peaceful waterside walk along the River Lim from Uplyme to Lyme Regis. It's a nice peaceful walk with countryside views, rushing weirs and views of the coast in Lyme Regis. Though a short route, it actually takes you from Devon into Dorset.
The walk starts at the small East Devon village of Uplyme about 1.5 miles north west of the coastal resort of Dorset based Lyme Regis. You begin at the parish church of St. Peter and St. Paul which includes a 14th century tower. From here head south along Church Street where you can pick up a footpath running along the river. A mixture of quiet lanes and riverside footpaths take you down into the town.
The walk then finishes at the Lyme Regis Town Mill a watermill dating from 1340, which has been restored to working order, producing flour. It is powered by water from the River Lim via a leat running along a lynch.  View Full Details>>
Osmington White Horse3 miles (5.5 km)Climb to the Osmington White Horse and enjoy wonderful views along the Jurassic Coast on this circular walk in Dorset. You start the walk from the interesting village of Osmington, near Weymouth. The village includes a church dating from the 12th century and picturesque thatched dwellings dating back to the 16th century. You then pick up the South Dorset Ridgeway and the South West Coast Path to take you up to Osmington Hill. The distinctive figure dates from the early 19th century and represents King George III riding his horse. After taking in the views you descend to the village of Sutton Poyntz. It's a lovely little village with thatched cottages, a stream with a nice footpath and a mill pond. It's a great place to stop for refreshments before the final leg back to Osmington. This takes you along public footpaths past White Horse Farm before returning you to the village.
If you'd like to continue your walk you could head down to the lovely Osmington Mills and enjoy views of Osmington Bay. Continue east along the coast path and you will pass the site of the medieval village of Ringstead before coming to Ringstead Bay. If you would like to view the white horse without the walk you can visit the new Osmington White Horse viewpoint. It can be found on the A353 heading towards Osmington from Weymouth. It has information boards and a great view of the white horse. View Full Details>>
Dovedale2 miles (4 km)The beautiful Dovedale is one of the must see areas in the Peak District. The area attracts a million visitors each year because of its stunning natural beauty.
The walk starts at the Dove Dale car park, near Thorpe. It's a large car park so there should be spaces available most of the time. You then head north along the River Dove to the famous View Full Details>>
Latrigg5 miles (8.5 km)Climb this popular fell near Keswick on this lovely circular walk in the Lake District National Park. The walk starts in the town of Keswick and ascends Latrigg using the Cumbria Way and other footpaths. You continue towards Brundholme before returning through Brundholme Wood with a section along the Keswick Railway Path leading back into Keswick. This final section includes waterside walking along the River Greta.
The summit stands at 368 m (1,207 ft) and the views of Derwent Water, Keswick and down the valley of Borrowdale are stunning. This is a popular walk because of its proximity to Keswick. It is also a relatively straightforward climb on well defined paths.
Another popular fell is the nearby Catbells which gives faboulous views across Derwent Water.
Also nearby is the fascinating Castlerigg Stone Circle. The ancient stone circle is located about a mile from Kewswick and is well worth a visit. View Full Details>>
Herefordshire Beacon and British Camp2 miles (2.5 km)This walk climbs to Herefordshire Beacon in the Malvern Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. As well as some splendid views the site includes the significant British Camp Iron Age Hillfort, first constructed in the 2nd century BC. The boundary between Herefordshire and Worcestershire also runs just past the hill to the east.
The hill includes a few different footpaths which you can use to make a circular walk. You can start from the car park just to the north of the hill, off the A449. There's handy information boards here giving a detailed history of the camp.
From the car park you can directly pick up a path to take you up to the top of the beacon. At the 338 m (1,109 ft) summit there are splendid views into the counties of Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire. Just to the west of the hill you can also see the lovely Eastnor Deer Park and mock 19th century castle.
Follow the paths south through the earthworks and defensive ditches of British Camp to Millenium Hill, before descending on other paths to the car park. You could also pick up other trails to take you to the pretty British Camp Reservoir, just to the south east of the car park.
You can pick up the Geopark Way long distance trail to further explore the Malvern Hills. Following the paths north will take you to the popular Worcestershire Beacon and the town of Great Malvern. If you head south you will soon come to Midsummer Hill where there is another Iron Age Hillfort and Scheduled Ancient Monument. View Full Details>>
Nidd Gorge7 miles (11 km)Explore this beautiful river gorge on this waterside walk in Knaresborough. This circular walk takes you through the wooded gorge before crossing the Nidd Viaduct and returning to Knaresborough through the countryside around Old Bilton. It makes use of the Harrogate Ringway long distance path for part of the route.
The walk starts in Knaresborough at the Conyngham Hall car park near the town centre and train station. You then head along Harrogate Road and High Bond End Road before turning down Lands Lane towards the river. The trail then weaves its way through the ancient woodland to Viaduct Wood and the Nidd Viaduct. Look out for a variety wildlife such as tawny owl, roe deer, woodpeckers and herons on the water. You then cross the Nidd Viaduct and head through the village of Old Bilton. The final section takes you through the countryside along Bilton Lane to the finish point back at the car park. View Full Details>>
Poets Walk Clevedon1 miles (2 km)This short walk in Clevedon follows the Poet's Walk footpath along the cliff tops to the west of the town. The walk is inspired by some of the poets and writers who have visited Clevedon. These include Coleridge in 1795 and Tennyson in 1834. It's also a local nature reserve and includes calcareous grassland, coastal scrub, woodland, with fine views over the Bristol Channel.
The walk starts in a lovely spot at the pretty Marine Lake at Salthouse Bay. From here you can pick up the little path heading south west along the coast. It runs down to Wain's Hill where there is an univallate Iron Age Fort. The hillfort is defined by a steep, natural slope from the south and north with two ramparts to the east. You can follow footpaths round the hill to the noteworthy St Andrew's Church.  Parts of the original 12th century church remain with 14th and 15th century additions also. It's located in a fine elevated spot overlooking the Bristol Channel, and has been designated as a Grade I listed building. View Full Details>>
John Bunyan Trail77 miles (124 km)Follow in the footsteps of John Bunyan, the Puritan Evangelist and author of the book 'Pilgrim's Progress'. The walk visits many historic villages associated with Bunyan. It starts at Streatley and visits Sharpenhoe, Harlington, Westoning, Steppingley, Flitwick, Ampthill, Millbrook, Ridgmont, Cranfield, Bromham, Stevington, Pavenham, Oakley, Clapham, Bedford, Elstow, Shefford, Meppershall, Shillington, Hexton and Barton le Clay before returning to Streatley. There's some beautiful Bedfordshire countryside to enjoy including Sharpenhoe Clappers, the Barton Hills, the Pegsdon Hills and views of the Chiltern Hills for much of the walk.
The walk is waymarked with a white disc featuring a silhouette of John Bunyan. View Full Details>>
Dundry Hill5 miles (7.6 km)A nice circular walk around the Somerset village of Dundry, exploring the expansive Dundry Hill which surrounds the village. There's some lovely countryside and great views of the Chew Valley to the south and the city of Bristol to the north.
The hill is also geologically significant with a limestone cap formed during the Jurassic period. It's also rich in fossils and freestone which has been quarried since Roman times.
Look out for a variety of flora and fauna as you make your way across the hill. You may see birds including Buzzard, Stonechat and Perigrine Falcon. In the meadows you can see lots of wildflowers including orchids and knapweed.
The walk starts next to the church in the village and heads east on tracks and footpaths to East Dundry. You then follow country lanes west to Dundry Down, where you will reach a height of over 700ft.
The route then returns to the village where you can enjoy refreshments at the Dundry Inn and visit the historic church which dates from the 15th century. View Full Details>>
Stansted Park5 miles (8.1 km)Enjoy a circular walk around the 1800 acre park surrounding the Edwardian Stansted House near Chichester. The parkland has a series of public footpaths to follow around the estate with woodland, moderate hill climbs and countryside views.
The walk starts from the car park at the western end of the park. You could also start from Rowland's Castle which has a train station close by.
From the car park you can pick up the Monarch's Way and follow it east through the edge of Stansted Forest to Walderton. Here the route turns south following footpaths to Lordington House. The Grage II listed building was built in 1500 and now operates as a bed and breakfast.
The path then turns west to the noteworthy Racton Monument. The 80 ft (24m) high folly dates from the 18th century and afford wonderful views to the Isle of Wight.
The route then follows Park Lane west before turning north to pass Stansted House. The house began as a hunting lodge in the 11th century. It was built on the present site in 1688 but burnt down in 1900, and rebuilt on the exact footprint of the previous building in 1903.
After passing the house the route soon returns to the finish point back at the car park. View Full Details>>
Kentmere Horseshoe12 miles (19 km)This challenging circular route explores the range of fells in the upper Kentmere valley area of the Lake District. The route visits some of the quieter areas of the national park while visiting a series of lesser known fells. There's wonderful views of several lakes, the surrounding fells, the Pennine Hills and the Lancashire coast. The path is generally pretty good for nearly all of the route.
The walk starts from the village of Kentmere located a few miles east of Ambleside. You then climb towards Garburn Nook along Crabtree Brow and Garburn Pass. The route then turns north to Yoke Fell which stands at a height of 706 m (2,316 ft). From here there are great views of Lake Windermere, Morecambe Bay, Coniston and Langdale.
From Yoke Fell you continue to Ill Bell where you will find a number of columnar cairns and splendid views towards the Scafells. The path continues to Thornthwaite Fell via Froswick Fell with great views of Kentmere Common and Kentmere Reservoir below.
At Thornthwaite Fell you turn east towards Mardale Ill Bell and Harter Fell. Here you can enjoy nice views down towards Haweswater before turning south toward Kentmere Pike.
The path then descends to Shipman Knotts with its rocky outcrops and steep slopes. The final section descends to Wray Crag and High Lane before returning to the village. View Full Details>>
Glossop16 miles (25.5 km)This popular market town is often referred to as the gateway to the Peak District National Park'. As such it's a walkers paradise with several waymarked trails, beautiful reservoirs and challenging hill climbs to try.
This long circular walk visits several of the highlights of the area, heading to the Longdendale Reservoirs before picking up the Pennine Way for a climb to Bleaklow Hill. The route then returns to Glossop along the course of an old Roman Road with wonderful moorland scenery to enjoy.
Starting in the town centre, near the train station, head through Manor Park in Old Glossop. You continue north past Swineshaw Reservoir to Padfield where you come to the Longdendale Reservoirs. This beautiful series of reservoirs have nice trails running along the southern side of the water including the splendid Longdendale Trail. Follow the paths past Bottoms, Woodhead, Valehouse and Rhodeswood reservoir. At Torside Reservoir you can pick up the Pennine Way to take you up to Torside Clough and then on to Bleaklow. The elevated largely peat covered, gritstone moorland, is popular with walkers with wonderful far reaching views over Greater Manchester, Lancashire, Cheshire and the Hope Valley.
After taking in the views, descend south to Hope Clough before turning west and following the Doctor's Gate Roman Road back into Glossop. There's wonderful views of Gathering Hill, the waters of the pretty Shelf Brook and the fine moorland scenery of Shelf Moor. View Full Details>>
Marple Canal Locks1 miles (2 km)This easy walk takes you along a particularly lovely section of the Peak Forest Canal in Marple. You'll pass the Marple Lock Flight consisting of a flight of sixteen canal locks over the course of about 1 mile. It's a splendid sight with lots of boats to see in the summer months and nice views of the surrounding countryside.
The walk starts from Marple Memorial Park where there's a car park, tree sculptures, sensory gardens and nice views towards the Peak District hills. From the car park follow footpaths leading down to the canal where you can pick up the towpath and head north, passing the lock flight. The walk passes Brabyn's Park before finishing at Marple Aqueduct. The structure was built to carry the lower level of the Peak Forest Canal across a length of the River Goyt. It is the highest canal aqueduct in England and the highest masonry-arch aqueduct in Britain.
You can extend the walk by continuing along the Etherow Goyt Valley Way which will take you west along the river towards Bredbury. Etherow Country Park is also very close by. There's more nice waterside trails along the River Etherow here.
The Macclesfield Canal also starts at the locks. You can follow it south through the countryside to Bollington. View Full Details>>
Bath Canal Walk5 miles (8 km)This is a popular walk along the Kennet and Avon Canal from Bath to Bradford on Avon. It's about a 10 mile walk along the towpath taking you from Somerset into Wiltshire on the southern fringes of the Cotswolds AONB. On the way you'll pass pretty locks, lots of barges, delightful little cottages, interesting villages, and attractive parks and gardens.
The walk starts at Bath locks situated at the start of the Kennet and Avon Canal. You then head north towards Bathwick passing through tunnels as you go. At Bathwick you pass the lovely Sydney Gardens which are worth a slight deviation from the canal to explore. The gardens are the only remaining eighteenth-century pleasure gardens in England.
The path continues to the village of Bathampton where you can take a small detour to visit the Toll Bridge over the River Avon. The bridge and toll house are both Grade II listed. There's splendid views from the bridge down to the beautiful weir below.
At Bathampton you turn south to Claverton. The little village has a Grade II listed pumping house and a church which dates from the 13th century.
You continue south towards Monkton Combe, passing the Dundas Aqueduct which carries the Kennet and Avon Canal over the River Avon on the Somerset Wiltshire border. It's a real highlight of the walk with great views over the river and the surrounding countryside from the elevated position of the aqueduct. You can virtually explore this section of the canal using the google street view link below.
The route then heads to Limpley Stoke and Freshford, passing Conkwell Wood on the way. The final section takes you into Wiltshire where you will pass the impressive Avoncliff Viaduct and Barton Farm Country Park before finishing in Bradford Upon Avon. Barton Farm is worth exploring if you have time. It includes historic buildings, craft shops and tea rooms while the farmhouse, granary and tithe barn of the original Barton Farm date back to the 14th century.
There's lots of good options for extending your walking around the canal. At Bathampton you can pick up the tremendous Bath Skyline Walk where you can enjoy fabulous views over the city. View Full Details>>
The Calf from Sedbergh7 miles (11.2 km)Climb to the highest top in the Howgills on this challenging walk from Sedbergh. The walk follows a section of the Dales High Way long distance trail so takes place on good paths. It's about a 3.5 mile hike heading north from the town centre.
Starting in the eastern part of the town follow Castleshaw Lane north from where it meets with Main Street. This will lead you to a footpath along the pretty Settlebeck Gill towards Arant Haw Fell.
The path continues to climb past Rowantree Gains Fold and Calders Fell before coming to the summit of The Calf. From the 676 m (2,218 ft) summit there are fabulous views of the Lakeland peaks, the Yorkshire Three Peaks and many of the nearer Howgill Fells.
At the summit you have the option of heading east and visiting Cautley Spout waterfall and then descending south east along Cautley Beck towards Low Haygarth. Around here you can pick up the Pennine Journey trail and return to Sedbergh on this path. This turns the route into a longer circular walk.
If you'd like to extend your walking in the Sedbergh area you can try our circular walk which visits the River Rawthey and the River Dee.
The Dales Way long distance trail also passes through the town and is a great way to explore this lovely area of the Yorkshire Dales. View Full Details>>
Landacre Bridge from Withypool4 miles (7 km)This circular walk takes you from the little village of Withypool to the medieval Landacre Bridge on Exmoor. It uses a section of the long distance Two Moors Way footpath to reach the picturesque scheduled ancient monument which spans the River Barle. Along the way there's lovely views across the National Park with lots of Exmoor Ponies to look out for too.
The walk starts in the centre of the village where car parking is available. From here you can pick up a public footpath along the Two Moors Way, heading north west from the village. Follow the path for about a quarter of a mile to Kitridge Lane, where you turn left.
The trail then follows the country lane for just over a mile until you reach Landacre Lane on the left.
The lane will take you to the stone bridge with its distinctive five arches. It dates from the late medieval period and is Grade II listed. There's lovely views down the river to the moors in all both directions.
Shortly after crossing the bridge, you can pick up a footpath on the left. This will take you through the countryside to Brightworthy where you can follow a nice riverside footpath along the Barle back into Withypool.
To extend your walking in the Withypool area you can follow the river south along the Two Moors Way to Tarr Steps. Here you will find a medieval clapper bridge set in a beautiful riverside nature reserve.
The Exe Valley Way also passes through the village. You could follow it north to Exford and enjoy views of the River Exe. View Full Details>>
Derwent Water9 miles (14 km)Enjoy a walk along one of the Lake District's most beautiful lakes. Derwent Water (or Derwenwater) is particularly lovely - it's surrounded by fells and has several pretty islands including Derwent Island House, an 18th-century residence owned by the National Trust and open to the public on five days each year.
The route makes use of the Cumbria Way and the Allerdale Ramble walking trails so is well defined and way-marked throughout.
The walk starts in the popular town of Keswick and follows the path along the western side of the lake. On the way down you stay close to the waters edge for most of the way. There are also some lovely woodland sections to enjoy.
At the end of the lake you return north on the Allerdale Ramble with a short climb taking you along the lower part of Cat Bells fell and away from the lakeside. There are fabulous views of the lake from the high points before descending through Overside Wood and returning to Keswick. View Full Details>>
Isle of Wight Coast Path70 miles (113 km)Explore the stunning coastline of this beautiful island on this circular walk.
The walk begins at Cowes and passes the lovely Gurnard and Thorness Bays before coming to Newton, with its delightful wildlife Nature Reserve. You continue along the Newton River estuary, passing Newton Bay on your way to the popular town of Yarmouth where the ferry arrives from Lymington. Here you will cross the river Yar and pass the castle before coming to the village of Freshwater.
The path then leads you to the south west tip of the island where you will pass the beautiful Alum Bay and the famous Needles rocks. The Needles Park is one of the most popular attractions on the island and includes a chairlift which gives fabulous views of the Needles Rocks and Lighthouse.
From the Needles you head east towards St Catherine's point, passing Freshwater, Brighstone and Chale Bay.
After rounding St Catherine's point (the southernmost point of the island) and lighthouse you pass a series of pretty bays and coves on your way to the popular seaside resort at Ventnor.
The path then visits two more lovely seaside resorts at Shanklin and Sandown. Shanklin has a picturesque old town and a pretty esplanade with a number of hotels and restaurants. Sandown Bay is also attractive with a popular stretch of golden sand and the interesting Victorian town to explore.
You then round the chalk down at Culver Down, before passing Bembridge with its pretty harbour, bays and beaches. Next stop is the seaside resort at Ryde with beaches and the esplanade to enjoy.
The final section takes you from Ryde to Cowes, crossing Wooton creek and passing Osborne House. The house was built between 1845 and 1851 for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert as a summer home and boasts stunning gardens, state rooms and galleries.
Soon after you cross the river Medina and arrive at the finish point at Cowes harbour. View Full Details>>
Tarn Hows2 miles (3.5 km)This popular beauty spot is perfect for a peaceful walk in beautiful surroundings. The area is run by the National Trust and consists of a large picturesque tarn surrounded by woodland. There are well surfaced tracks taking you around the tarn and into the woodland. From the high points there are lovely views of the Lake District Mountains and the surrounding countryside. On a clear day you can see Helvellyn, Nethermost Pike, Dollywaggon Pike, Fairfield, Hart Crag and Dove Crag.
The walk starts from the National Trust car park just to the south of the tarns. Head north along country lanes and you can pick up the nice surfaced footpaths along the water. There's also the option of climbing above lakes on the eastern side, where there's splendid views down to the tarns.
At the northern end of the lake there's some benches where you can enjoy a rest at what is roughly the half way point of the walk. View Full Details>>
Hambleton Hills20 miles (32 km)This walk explores the Hambleton Hills range on the western edge of the North York Moors. You'll visit the highest points on the hills with splendid views over the Vale of Mowbray, the River Rye Valley and the Vale of York. The route makes use of the Cleveland Way national trail for the duration of the walk.
Start your walk at the Kilburn White Horse car park and then head north past the iconic hill figure to the splendid Sutton Bank passing Roulston Scar on the way. The hill at Sutton Bank is the site of one of the most important prehistoric monuments in the region, an Iron Age hill fort dating from about 400 BC.
You continue past Gormire Lake and Hambleton Down before skirting the eastern edge of Boltby Forest. From here you head between Kepwick Moor and Arden Great Moor before coming to Black Hambleton which rises to a height of 1,308 feet (400 m). Take a while to enjoy the fabulous views over the surrounding moorland and woodland before returning on the same footpath. View Full Details>>
Richmond to Kingston River Walk5 miles (7.5 km)A lovely riverside walk along the Thames Path from Richmond to Kingston via Twickenham. It's an easy waterside stroll running for just under 5 miles so should take around 2 hours at a leisurely pace. At the end of the walk you can catch a train directly back to Richmond from Kingston station.
The walk starts on the 18th century stone arch Richmond Bridge. Pick up the Thames Path on the eastern side of the bridge and follow it south, passing the Terraced Gardens and Richmond Hill. The hill is a famous spot with a magnificent view back down to the Thames. It is the only view in England to be protected by an Act of Parliament and has been immortalised in paintings by Sir Joshua Reynolds and J. M. W. Turner.
You continue past Petersham Meadow and Glover's Island towards Twickenham. Here you pass Eel Pie Island, home to Twickenham Rowing Club, about 50 homes and two nature reserves.
The path then passes Ham Lands, a local nature reserve consisting of a variety of habitats which attract many bird and butterfly species. There's a wide area of grassland with scrub, flood meadow and various wildflowers to see in the warmer months.
Shortly after you come to the lovely Teddington Lock. It's a very pretty spot with two 19th century footbridges and the rushing waters of Teddington Weir.
The final section takes you past Canbury Gardens in Kingston. It's a nice riverside park with open lawns, tree lined footpaths, tennis courts and a band stand.
Shortly after the route finishes at Kingston Bridge. The bridge is Grade II listed and was opened in 1828. To extend the walk you can cross the bridge and visit Bushy Park. It's a beautiful park with lots of deer, tranquil ponds, the attractive Cheshunt Avenue and the picturesque Diana Fountain.
Hampton Court Park is also very close by. Here you'll find more deer and long tree lined avenues running along the Long Water canal. View Full Details>>
Channel to Channel50 miles (80 km)This walk takes you from the English Channel to the Bristol Channel, through the Devon and Somerset countryside.
The walk begins on the south coast at Seaton in Devon, and first heads towrds Axminster, passing through Seaton Down and Colyton, crossing the River Coly as you go.
At Axminster, you join the River Yarty for a long riverside stretch towards Bishopswood, passing the Horse Pool Camp univallate Iron Age hill fort enclosure on the way.
The walk continues through the beautiful Blackdown Hills AONB, climbing Staple Hill which offers fabulous views as the highest point in the Blackdown Hills. You then descend through wooded areas and the village of Pitminster to Taunton, the county town of Somerset.
The path then takes you on from Taunton through the stunning Quantock Hills towards Cothelstone and then on to Stogumber. The final section takes you to the finish point at Watchet passing two historic sites on the way. First you will come to the Orchard Wyndham historic house, parts of which date from medieval times. Shortly after you come to the Battlegore Burial Chamber which is a Bronze Age burial chamber at Williton.
The end point of the walk is the lovely harbour town of Watchet which sits on the Bristol Channel. View Full Details>>
Dartington6 miles (9.5 km)A splendid circular walk around the Dartington Hall Estate near Totnes in Devon. The estate includes hundreds of acres of parkland with beautiful gardens, riverside paths and peaceful woodland trails. The Gardens, Deer Park and estate trails are open from dawn until dusk all year round. The site also includes a very good visitor centre and a range of shops.
The walk starts at the main hall car park where you can directly access the gardens. With a wide variety of plants and trees the gardens look absolutely stunning in the autumn months. There are nice footpaths to follow around this area before picking up another trail to take you down to the river.
The footpath then runs along the river to Staverton railway station on the South Devon Railway. You pass Staverton Bridge before heading through North Wood towards Dartington village. The final section takes you back to the river for a final waterside stretch, before returning to the gardens.
Dartington is great for wildlife so keep your eyes peeled for a variety of woodland birds, butterflies and deer as you make your way around the estate.
This route is designed for walkers but a National Cycle Network route skirts the western edge of the estate. The traffic free trail can be followed from Totnes, passing along the river before coming to the village.
To continue your walking in the area you could head south and try our Totnes River Walk. The circular trail follows the Franklin Totnes Trail along the Dart and through the countryside to the west of the town.
The Dart Valley Trail can also be picked up here. The long distance trail will take you all the way to the Dart Estuary in Dartmouth. View Full Details>>
Torquay to Babbacombe6 miles (9.5 km)This is a popular coastal walk from Torquay to the lovely Babbacombe Downs. It's about a 6 mile hike along an undulating section of the South West Coast Path. The route is fairly flat but there are some moderate climbs so a reasonable level of fitness is required. Along the way there's wonderful cliff top views, pretty beaches and some nice woodland sections.
At Babbacombe you'll find the Babbacombe Model Village, a pretty cliff top green and the Babbacombe Cliff Railway which will take you down to the attractive Oddicombe Beach. You can either return the same way or catch the bus back to Torquay.
The route starts on Corbyn Beach in Torquay, just a short hop from the train station. You head east along a pretty stretch of the English Riviera, passing the Grand Hotel and the marina with its rows of boats and yachts. You continue past Meadfoot Beach to the headland at Hope's Nose. Here you will find an area of geological significance with limestone rocks, lots of fossils and great views.
From Hope's Nose you turn north to Black Head before passing along the lovely Babbacombe cliff top path with well laid out gardens and more great views.
To extend the walk you can continue north to Maidencombe and Teignmouth, where you can enjoy a riverside walk along the River Teign. If you head along the other coast you can visit Paignton and Brixham on the Torquay to Brixham Walk.
Also in Torquay is Cockington Country Park with its ornamental lakes, woodlands and formal gardens. View Full Details>>
Hythe12 miles (19 km)This long circular walk explores the countryside around the Kent town of Hythe. It uses a number of the long distance trails which pass through the area. You'll enjoy canalside paths, hill climbs, woodland trails and fabulous views of the North Downs and the coast.
The route starts at the train station and immediately picks up the Royal Military Canal Path and heads west towards West Hythe. Here you turn north and climb along the Saxon Shore Way to Pedlinge, passing Folks' Wood on the way. The route continues through Chesterfield Wood, skirting the edge of Brockhill Country Park. In the park you can enjoy waymarked woodland trails, a lake, open grassland and meadows.
The next stage takes you to Tolsford Hill where you can see the BT Tower. Around here the walk reaches its high point at over 600ft with splendid views over the surrounding area.
After passing the tower you descend past Etchinghill to Asholt Wood on the Elham Valley Way. You can either skirt the edge of the wood or follow the path along the dismantled railway line on this section. Just north of the woods you have the option of picking up the North Downs Way and following it south east to Peene Quarry Country Park and the Folkestone White Horse.
At Peene you pass the Channel Tunnel Terminal and Newington before heading through Scene Wood and the Sene Valley Golf Course. This leads you through Hythe and back to the canal where you pick up the waterside path through the town centre, before returning to the finish point back at the train station.
To extend your walking in the area you could head east along the canal and then pick up the coast path towards Folkestone. On the way you can pay a visit to the delightful Lower Leas Coastal Park where there are lovely gardens with a wide variety of interesting flora and fauna to see. View Full Details>>
Hathersage8 miles (12.5 km)The village of Hathersage is a popular base for walkers wishing to explore some of the highlights of the Peak District National Park. It has several long distance trails running past it and a number of challenging climbs to try. Set in the beautiful Hope and Derwent Valleys the village is accessible by rail services to Hathersage train station.
Probably the most popular walk from the village is the climb to the beautiful gritstone escarpment of Stanage Edge. A similarly exhilirating climb across Bamford Edge is also possible from the village. There's more interesting gritstone rock formations and fabulous views from here.
The Derwent Valley Heritage Way also runs through the village along the River Derwent. If you follow the riverside path in a north westerly direction it will soon take you to the beautiful Ladybower Reservoir.
Heading south along the river will take you to the splendid Longshaw Estate and Padley Gorge with its beautiful wooded valley.
The 'Plague Village' of Eyam is just a few miles to the south of Hathersage. It is well worth a visit with its fascinating history, 17th century Eyam Hall and stone circle on Eyam Moor.
This circular walk takes you up on to Hathersage Moor, visiting Higger Tor and Carl Wark Hill Fort. There's lovely moorland scenery, fine views back down to the village and some interesting rock formations to look out for.
The walk starts in the village and follows footpaths to High Lees before climbing onto Hathersage Moor. Here you visit the Iron Age Hill Fort of Carl Wark which stands at a height of 370 metres (1,214 ft). The path then climbs to the nearby Higger Tor at a height of 434 m (1,424 ft). The striking gritstone tor overlooks the Burbage Valley. The route then descends to Burbage Bridge with views of the pretty Burbage Brook. Around here you can pick up the Padley Gorge Trail which takes you along the delightful brook with its waterfalls, rocky boulders and wooden bridges. This walk heads into the National Trust owned Longshaw Estate. The estate is fabulous walking country with ancient woods, parkland, heather moorland, ponds and the pretty Barbrage Brook. This section of the trail also links with the Sheffield Country Walk which takes you on a circular tour of the countryside around the city of Sheffield.
The final section of the walk takes you through Granby Wood and Yarncliff Wood before crossing the western side of the moor and returning to the village. View Full Details>>
Ilfracombe to Woolacombe Coastal Walk8 miles (12.8 km)The coast path between Ilfracombe and Woolacombe runs for about 8 miles along a series of dramatic cliffs, beautiful bays and lovely beaches.
The walk starts on the front in Ilfracombe and climbs to Capstone Point and Capstone Hill. It's a fairly challenging start to the walk but with great views across the town and harbour as your reward.
The path continues west past The Outfalls to The Torrs Park Local Nature Reserve. There's a great zig-zag path and views all the way to Exmoor from the high points here.
The next stage runs past Freshwater Bay and the small village of Lee. The village lies at the foot of what is known locally as the Fuchsia Valley, and consists of around 100 properties, mostly old in style. There's a beach accessible from the coastal path via a National Trust-maintained path and staircase down the cliff face.
The next stage takes you up to the Bull Point Lighthouse before heading along Rockham Bay to Morte Point. This splendid peninsula has some fascinating rock formations and great views towards Lundy Island. It's owned by the National Trust so there are good paths to follow across the headland. The area is also great for wildlife with Atlantic grey seals to look out for in the waters below.
The final stage takes you into the popular seaside resort of Woolacombe. Here you will find a 3 mile long sandy beach recognised as one of the best beaches in Europe. View Full Details>>
Woodbridge2 miles (3.3 km)The Suffolk town of Woodbridge has some lovely trails to try along the River Deben. You can follow the river north or south with two National Trust properties to visit. Heading north will take you towards Melton where you can cross the river to visit Sutton Hoo. This circular walk heads south along a section of the Fynn Valley Walk to take you to Kyson Hill and Kyson Point on the western side of the river.
It's a really lovely stretch of the Deben with lots of little boats and nice views of the surrounding countryside.
You can start the walk from the train station which is located right next to the quay. From here you can pick up the Fynn Valley Walk next to the Woodbridge Tide Mill. The Grade I listed building is very well preserved and has a water wheel which still turns and is capable of grinding a wholemeal flour. A mill has operated on the site for 800 years and is now open to the public for tours.
Follow the river south and you will soon come to Kyson Hill. The National Trust owned area includes a grassy hill, surrounded by wooded belts, sloping down to the saltings and mudflats of the tidal Deben. It's a great area for bird watching with many species visiting the estuary. Look out for egrets, oyster catchers, plovers, teals, little grebes, redshanks, black tailed godwits, and curlews as you make your way along the river.
After admiring the estuary views from the little hill, the walk continues to Kyson Point where there are fine views of Martlesham Creek.
The route then follows other paths back to the town through the countryside. View Full Details>>
Cheddar Gorge4 miles (6 km)This is a circular walk around the magnificent Cheddar Gorge in Somerset. It is England's largest gorge at 400 feet deep and three miles long and one of the most magnificent natural visitor attractions in the country. It was formed during the last Ice Age when water from melting glaciers formed a river, which gradually carved into the limestone rock creating the spectacular steep cliffs you can see today.
This walk is the popular 4 mile circular route around the gorge. It begins at the National Trust shop and information centre where you can pick up more details on this walk which includes some steep climbs, rugged paths and easier woodland sections. Please keep to the signed footpaths as it is dangerous to depart from these.
Widlife on the route includes Peregrine falcons and Buzzards which nest in the gorge. Also look out for the rare feral Soay sheep, feral goats and ponies. View Full Details>>
Roseland Peninsula10 miles (16 km)Explore the beautiful Roseland Peninsula on this 10 mile walk on the Cornish coast. The walk starts from the village of Porscatho where there is a good sized car park by the coast. You could also start from nearby Gerrans where there is an interesting 13th century church.
From the Porscatho car park you head south along the South West Coast Path, passing a series of pretty coves and beaches including the Carricknath Point and Porthbean Beach SSSI. Here you will find sand covered beaches, natural rock platforms with fragments of saltmarsh, cliff top grassland, low rocky headlands and a variety of rare plants.
You continue south to Zone Point, at the southernmost extremity of the peninsula extending into Falmouth Bay. Near here you will find the National Trust owned St Anthony Head Lighthouse. The headland is one of the highlights of the peninsula overlooking the entrance to one of the world's largest natural harbours, Carrick Roads and the estuary of River Fal. The site also includes an old military fort with big guns, batteries and fortifications. Look out for wildlife including cormorants, shags and seals in this area.
The route continues past the pretty Little Molunan beach before turning north along St Mawes Harbour with nice views across to St Mawes Quay. This section includes some nice woodland trails with bluebells, primroses and celandines to see. Also look out for a wide variety of butterflies fluttering around the wildflowers.
The path then takes you along the Porth Creek with views down to the Percuil River and a stretch through farmland. The final section takes you back along the coast to Porscatho.
To continue your walking in the area you could head to the nearby town of Falmouth and visit the fascinating Pendennis Castle and the lovely Swanpool Nature Reserve. You can also enjoy a walk from St Mawes to St Just with a visit to the fascinating St Mawes Castle and the St Just in Roseland 13th-century church with beautiful riverside gardens. The ferry from St Mawes will take you across the Fal Estuary to Falmouth where you can continue along the South West Coast Path. View Full Details>>
Mid-Wilts Way68 miles (109 km)A 68-mile walking route that takes in some of Wiltshire's finest countryside and downland areas. The walk runs from the village of Ham (near Inkpen) to Mere (near Warminster).
You will visit a series of pretty villages including Wilton, Wootton Rivers, Oare, Seend Cleeve, Keevil, Steeple Ashton, Bratton, Upton Scudamore, Horningham and Kingston Deverill. The walk includes several hill climbs with fabulous views of the Wiltshire countryside. This includes a climb to Cley Hill in the Cranborne Chase AONB. The hill is owned by the National Trust and commands great views over Wiltshire and Somerset.
There are also long waterside sections along the Kennet and Avon Canal and a section through Longleat Center Parcs towards the end of the walk.
The route is now officially open and has been waymarked with discrete MWW discs. The Visit Wiltshire website has some excellent downloadable guides . Please note the route has recently been extended so this link does not include the full current route. View Full Details>>
Dartmoor Ramble50 miles (80 km)A wonderful circular walk around the fascinating Dartmoor National Park with plenty of lovely riverside walking and some challenging climbs.
The walk starts near the car park at Bellever and first follows the East Dart River through Postbridge and on to Sittaford Tor where you will pass the historical Grey Wethers Stone Circle. Challenging climbs on Whitehorse Hill and Hangingstone Hill follow, offering fabulous views of Dartmoor and the surrounding areas.
The walk continues past Oke Tor to the town of Okehampton where you will pass the ruins of the 11th century Okehampton Castle. You then join the East Okemont River and the River Taw for two pleasant waterside stretches which lead you to the little village of Sticklepath. From here you head south towards Teigncombe where you join the River Teign for another riverside section which passes Chagford and the Wooton Castle Iron Age Hill fort before reaching the delightful Meadhaydown Wood Nature Reserve.
The route then turns west towards Moretonhampstead (notable for having the longest one-word name of any place in England) and onto Bovey Castle and then the fascinating Grimspound Bronze Age settlement which consists of a set of 24 hut circles surrounded by a low stone wall.
The final section takes you past the wooded Soussons Down to the finish point back at Bellever. View Full Details>>
Dover to Folkestone7 miles (11 km)This is a popular walk between these two major towns on the Kent coast. It's about a 7 mile walk, with some moderate climbs so a reasonable level of fitness is required. The walk takes you along cliff tops with great views and visits to the two country parks located on the route. You can return easily by catching the train back to Dover from Folkestone West railway station.
The walk starts at the docks in Dover and follows the North Downs Way to the ruins of the medieval Knights Templar Church, on Bredenstone hill. You continue past Aycliff to Samphire Hoe Country Park. The park was created by using chalk marl from the Channel Tunnel excavations and is found at the bottom of a section of the White Cliffs of Dover. There are great views over the Strait of Dover and a Nature Reserve with a large variety of wildlife to look out for.
You continue west, passing the  World War II coastal defence battery of Lydden Spout before coming to East Cliff and Warren Country Park. This route crosses the train line here to follow the coastal path but you could also pick up the woodland trails through the park. The park is formed of the East Cliffs of Folkestone, the sandy beaches of East Wear Bay and the land-slipped nature reserve land between the cliffs and the sea. There are more great views, interesting flora and fauna and three old Martello Towers to see. These were built on the cliffs in the early 19th century to protect against the French invasion of Napoleon.
The path continues along the coast, passing the Folkestone Roman Villa. The villa was built during the Roman Occupation of Britain, and is located in East Wear Bay. It's situated on a cliff top overlooking the English Channel, with views of the French coast at Boulogne on a clear day.
The final section descends to Folkestone, finishing at the harbour. Just down the coast you can visit Lower Leas Coastal Park if you wish to extend the walk. It's a lovely park with pretty gardens and a free adventure play area.
To travel along the coast in the other direction try the Dover to Deal Walk. View Full Details>>
Great Missenden5 miles (8 km)Enjoy a circular walk around the village of Great Missenden in the Chilterns. The walk visits the pretty abbey gardens before climbing the surrounding hills for great views back down to the village and into the surrounding Chilterns countryside.
The walk starts in the village near to the train station and parking area. You then head south along a section of the South Bucks Way long distance trail. This will take you to Missenden Abbey where you can explore the pretty Abbey Park with its lake and views of the River Misbourne.
The walk then heads east into the hills surrounding the village. You'll pass Chalkdell Wood Nature Reserve before climbing towards Hyde End where there is some woodland and attractive farmland.
The route then turns north through South Heath and Ballinger Common. You descend to Frith Hill before returning to the village.
The walk links with the Chiltern Link near Ballinger Common so you could pick up this long distance trail to extend your walk. Heading east will take you through the countryside to Chesham where you can enjoy nice riverside walk along the River Chess.
Another good option is to follow the South Bucks Way north and link with the Icknield Way Path. You can then enjoy a climb to Coombe Hill for more great views over the area.
Also near Coombe Hill are miles of woodland trails in Wendover Woods and waterside walks along the Grand Union Canal.
The Chiltern Heritage Trail also passes through the village. The long distance circular trail visits numerous delightful hamlets, villages and towns in Buckinghamshire. View Full Details>>
Abbot's Way22 miles (35 km)Travel from Buckfast Abbey to Tavistock Abbey on this long distance trail through the Dartmoor National Park. The trail runs for just over 20 miles, connecting these two historic abbeys and exposing you to some beautiful moorland scenery. Along the way there's a series of rocky tors, pretty rivers and interesting villages. The route climbs to a height of over 1660 feet so there are also great views across the National Park from the high points.
The walk starts at the wonderful Buckfast Abbey, just north of Buckfastleigh. You could reach the abbey by catching the heritage South Devon Railway to nearby Buckfastleigh and walking from there.
The trail then heads west, through Hockmoor, Lambs Down and Deans Moor before coming to the lovely Avon Dam Reservoir. The trail passes along the northern edge of the reservoir and then along the River Avon on a nice waterside section.
The trail then climbs past Stinger's Hill and Erme Pits Hill before coming to Plym Ford where you will find the remains of the old Wheel Katherine mine.
The next stage takes you past South Hessary Tor to the village of Princetown. It's the highest settlement on the moor, and one of the highest in the United Kingdom. The village is a good place to stop for refreshments with a good selection of pubs and cafes.
After leaving Princetown you head past North Hessary Tor before coming to Merrivale where there's Bronze Age megalithic monuments to the south and a former granite quarry.
The final section takes you across Whitchurch Common and Moortown before crossing the River Tavy and finishing at Tavistock Abbey. The abbey dates from the 10th century with ruins including the refectory, two gateways and a porch.
To extend your walk you can pick up the Tavistock Canal or the long distance West Devon Way. View Full Details>>
Lancaster Circular Walk10 miles (16 km)This 10 mile circular walk makes use of three of the long distance trails which run through the area surrounding the city. You'll pass along the River Lune on the Lune Valley Ramble before picking up the Lancaster Canal to take you to the coast. Here you follow the Lancashire Coastal Way to take you to along Morecambe Bay.
The walk starts at the train station in the city centre and first heads past Lancaster Castle and Priory. The medieval castle dates from the 12th century and has a fascinating history. You can enjoy the courtyard spaces, external views of the historic building, two small exhibition spaces, and the giftshop without charge, but public access to the interiors of the castle buildings is by guided tour only.
From the castle it is a short stroll down to the river where you pick up a nice riverside footpath to the impressive Millennium Bridge. You continue to the lovely Lune Aqueduct of the Lancaster Canal, which rises above the river. The navigable aqueduct carries the Lancaster Canal over the River Lune, and was completed in 1797. The route crosses the river here and continues along the towpath of the canal to Hest Bank on the coast. It's a lovely stretch of the canal with great views of the surrounding Lancashire countryside to enjoy.
At Hest Bank you pick up the coastal path to take you into Morecambe. There's lovely views of the attractive beach and the famous Morecambe Bay with lots of wading birds to look out for.
The final stage of the walk takes you along the Lancaster to Morecambe Cycleway. The shared surfaced path runs all the way back to the Lune in Lancaster.
The city is located on the edge of the Forest of Bowland AONB where there are miles of greating walking routes to try. You could head a few miles to the east and climb to Clougha Pike. From the hill summit there are wonderful views over Morecambe Bay, Snowdonia and the Lake District Fells.
Sunderland Point is located south of Lancaster and well worth a visit if you are in the area. There's nice footpaths to follow around a delightful peninsula with salt marsh salt marsh, beach, mud flats, farmland and lots of wildlife to look out for.
The Lunesdale Walk is another good option and can be picked up just to the north at Carnforth. It takes you through the Forest of Bowland, visiting many pretty villages and waterways.
The long distance Way of the Roses also passes through the city. It will also take you into the Forest of Bowland and then on into the Yorkshire Dales.
For another riverside stroll you could try the Lancaster to Caton route. The shared cycling and walking path takes you along the River Lune to nearby Caton. View Full Details>>
River Teign Walk44 miles (71 km)Follow the River Teign from the source on Dartmoor to Shaldon on the Devon coast. It's a splendid riverside trail with lots of pretty villages and great scenery to enjoy.
The walk starts at the car park in Postbridge, just to the north of Bellever Forest in Dartmoor. You then head north to Gidleigh passing Fernworthy Reservoir, Fernworthy Forest, Chagford Common and Scorhill Down.
From Gidleigh you head east towards Chagford and then on to the splendid Fingle Woods and Castle Drogo at Drewsteignton. This is a lovely section of the river which includes the iconic Fingle Bridge and the Iron Age Hill Fort of Wooston Castle. If you have time visit Castle Drogo and try the Hunters Path which gives great views of the river gorge below.
From Fingle Woods you continue east towards Dumsford, passing through a series of woods including Cod Wood, Dunsford Wood and Bridford Wood. These areas include nature reserves where you can look out for interesting flora and fauna by the river.
At Dumsford the route starts to turn to the south, passing Doddiscombleigh, Lower Ashton and Trusham before arriving at Chudleigh Knighton.
You continue south to Newton Abbot passing Stover Country Park and the Stover Canal on the way. The route then turns east to take you along the Teign Estuary to the finish point at Shaldon, near Teignmouth on the coast. It's a lovely final section with lots of birdlife to look out for on the estuary. You can see a nice view of this on the google street view link below. View Full Details>>

Panoramio: Photos are copyrighted by their owners