30 Search Results Found

Route NamePhotoDistanceDescription
Ambleside2 miles (4 km)Ambleside is one of the most popular bases for walkers in the Lake District. The town has great facilities with lots of shops selling walking equipment, several hotels and lots of pubs and cafes. There's several different walks to try from the town including challenging hill climbs, woodland trails, waterfalls and riverside paths.
This short walk around the town takes you to Rothay Park and then along the River Rothay to the Ambleside Roman Fort and Waterhead Pier on Lake Windermere. It's a nice gentle walk with lovely views of the surrounding fells.
You can start the walk from the car park in the centre of town and pick up a footpath along Stock Ghyll to Rothay Park. The park has picnic benches, large grassed areas and natural rock outcrops. The River Rothay also runs through the park and there are good views of the surrounding fells as well. Follow the path south along the river and it will lead you through fields to the roman fort. The fort is Grade I listed and dates from the 1st or 2nd century. It was probably built under Hadrian's rule to guard the Roman road from Brougham to Ravenglass. After exploring the fascinating remains of the fort you continue to Borrans Park at Waterhead. From here there are lovely views over Lake Windermere and nice pub where you can enjoy refreshments in the lakeside garden. View Full Details>>
Stock Ghyll Force1 miles (1 km)This walk takes you to the beautiful Stock Ghyll Force waterfall in Ambleside, in the Lake District. The waterfall is just a short walk from the centre of Ambleside. From here you walk to Stockgyhll Lane where there is a sign saying 'To the Waterfalls'. Bear left here to enter Stock Ghyll Woods where you follow shady paths along Stock Ghyll Beck to the main falls. Here you will find a railed viewpoint from which you can watch the spectacular 70 foot high waterfall. It's a lovely wooded climb with a series of smaller waterfalls to enjoy on the way.
If you would like to continue your walk you could climb Wansfell Pike for fabulous views of the Coniston Fells, Fairfield, Lake Windermere and Red Screes. View Full Details>>
Haystacks5 miles (7.5 km)Although not one of the highest of the Lake District fells at (597 m, 1,958 ft), Haystacks was one of Alfred Wainright's favourites. So much so that he chose to have his ashes scattered near the summit.
The walk begins at the car park at the south eastern end of Buttermere and starts by crossing Peggy's Bridge. You then cross Buttermere Fell, ascending to Scarth Gap and then to the summit. The view is magnificent with Gable Crag on Great Gable and the western panorama of Ennerdale Water and High Crag. Crummock Water and Buttermere are also visible.
The walk then heads past the lovely Innominate Tarn, a popular beauty spot with an indented rocky shore and a line of tiny islets. Shortly after you come to Blackbeck Tarn, a long slender pool which overflows through a cleft in the crags. You continue the descent through Warnscale Bottom with views of Warnscale Beck and a series of pretty waterfalls to enjoy.
If you'd like to continue your walking then a stroll around the nearby Ennerdale Forest and Buttermere Lake are always enjoyable. View Full Details>>
Cathedral Cavern2 miles (3.2 km)This walk visits the impressive Cathedral Quarries in Little Langdale. The cave system includes the 40ft high Cathedral Cavern which is a popular destination for walkers in this area of the Lake District. The circular route runs for about 2 miles with a few small climbs along the way.
Start the walk from the car park at Hodge Close where there's some spendid lakeland views. From the elevated spot you can see several fells including Lingmoor, Bowfell and the Pike of Blisco. Hodge Close is an unusual area with a series of striking quarries, pools of water, steep cliff faces and mine tunnel entrances to see.
After exploring the quarries the route heads north west, passing between the Klondyke Quarry and Quarry Wood. Continue north, passing the Moss Rigg Quarry and Moss Rigg Wood before coming to the Cathedral Cavern complex. Here you can enter a tunnel and follow it to the forty foot high chamber known as 'The Cathedral'. There are also other tunnels to explore, but please take care as many of them are very dark and require a torch.
After exploring the site, you turn east to follow the River Brathay pass Pierce How to Stang End. Turn south here to follow footpaths past Sepulchre Wood and the Wyth Bank Coppice before returning to the car park. View Full Details>>
Rydal Water3 miles (5 km)Enjoy a wonderful circular walk around the beautiful Rydal Water in the Lake District. The route makes use of the waterside trails on the southern side of the lake before picking up a section of the popular Coffin Route on the northern side. There's much to see on the route with views of the River Rothay, rushing becks, pretty waterfalls, woodland trails and a visit to Rydal Hall with its cafe and pretty gardens. It's about a 3 mile walk with some moderate climbs so a reasonable level of fitness is required.
You can start your walk from the good sized White Moss car park at the north eastern end of the lake. The bus also stops here if you are coming by public transport. From White Moss you can follow a footpath south through woodland and along the River Rothay to the eastern tip of Grasmere.
The path then climbs east towards Loughrigg Terrace before descending to the lakeside path. Eventually the path takes you through woodland and across the Rothay before climbing towards Rydal Hall.
The 19th century mansion has nice formal gardens and the pretty Rydal Falls where you can enter 'The Grot' - an 18th century summerhouse designed for viewing the waterfalls. There's also a very good tea shop with outdoor seating so it's a great place to stop for refreshments at what is the half way point of the route. Just up the hill you will find Rydal Mount, the home of the poet William Wordsworth from 1813 to his death in 1850.
After leaving Rydal Hall you pick up the Coffin Route so called because it was used to convey coffins on their final journey to St Oswalds Church in Grasmere. It heads west below Nab Scar with nice views over the lake from the elevated position of the path.
After about a mile you come to a beck where you turn left to return to the car park.
To continue your walking in the area you could climb to Loughrigg Fell on the southern side of the lake. From the 335 m (1,099 ft) summit there's fabulous views back down to Rydal Water and Grasmere Lake.
If you continue west along the coffin route it will take you into Grasmere where there are numerous good walking trails to try.
The White Moss Walks start from the same car park and will take you across White Moss Common where there's woodland and meadow to enjoy. View Full Details>>
High Street from Haweswater6 miles (9 km)Climb to the highest point in the far eastern section of the Lake District on this challenging circular walk. You can park at the Haweswater car park at Mardale Head at the southern end of the water to start your walk. You then pick up the footpath heading south west towards Small Water climbing along Mardale Beck. The path passes around Small Water to Nan Bield Pass before climbing to Mardale Ill Bell. At Nan Bield Pass you have the option of taking a detour and visiting Harter Fell.
From Mardale Ill Bell you climb around Blea Water to the 828 metres (2,718 ft) summit of High Street. The views are magnificent with the Pennines, the Helvellyn range and the Southern Fells all coming into view. The route then descends to Long Stile and Rough Crag with wonderful views back down to Haweswater as you go.
As an alternative you can head to Bowderthwaite Bridge where you can pick up a section of Wainwright's Coast to Coast long distance footpath. This will take you west up to Kidsty Howes and Kidsty Pike before turning south to reach the summit of High Street.
If you'd like to continue your walk you can pick up the footpath around Haweswater. The footpath along the western side of the lake is particularly lovely with areas of woodland, the pretty Measand Beck and The Forces waterfalls to enjoy. View Full Details>>
Elterwater Waterfalls Walk5 miles (7.5 km)A splendid circular walk from the Lake District village of Elterwater, visiting the Colwith Force and Skelwith Force waterfalls. There's much to enjoy with riverside footpaths, splendid views of the surrounding fells and the rushing waters of the two splendid falls.
The walk start from Elterwater, with its popular pub and old bridge over the Great Langdale Beck. You then climb up country lanes to reach Colwith Force Waterfall. The falls 40 feet over several stages and are surrounded by peaceful woodland. It's a secluded spot with the just the noise of the impressive falls breaking the silence.
Around here you pick up the Cumbria Way long distance trail and descend past Elterwater Park Farm to Skelwith Bridge. Here you will pass the impressive Skelwith Force Falls. Though small the falls are very powerful and can be seen up close from the viewing area. There's also some nice riverside tea rooms here where you can enjoy refreshments before continuing your walk.
The next stage takes you along the River Brathay and then Great Langdale Beck to Elterwater. The beck is very still around here so it's a lovely spot. The route here also uses a National Trust maintained footpath so it's very easy going. There's great views of the Langdale Fells return to Elterwater where you can enjoy a well earned drink in the pub garden...weather permitting!
To extend your walk follow the Cumbria Way south from Colwith Force and you can visit the beautiful Tarn Hows.
The walk up to Loughrigg Tarn starts from Skelwith Bridge so you could also take in this much loved beauty spot if you have time. View Full Details>>
High Pike6 miles (9.5 km)This walk climbs to High Pike from the village of Caldbeck in the Lake District. The walk follows the Cumbria Way all the way from the village to the summit. As such the route takes place on good waymarked paths.
It's about a 3 mile walk from Caldbeck to High Pike. From the car park in the village head south to Nether Row before climbing past Low Pike to the 658 m (2,159 ft) summit. Here you will find a trig point and  a substantial wind shelter which has been built from the stones of a ruined cottage. There are great views of the Solway Firth and the Scottish Border hills to the north. To the south are good views of Skiddaw and Blencathra.
To extend your walking in the area try our Caldbeck Walk which visits the waterfalls along the beck before climbing to Brownrigg.
You could also continue south along the Cumbria Way and climb to Skiddaw. Just to the south east is Carrock Fell which is often climbed as part of a circular walk with High Pike.
Also nearby is the expansive Greystoke Forest where you will find miles of mountain bike trails and footpaths. View Full Details>>
Grasmere5 miles (8 km)This circular walk from the popular village of Grasmere visits several Lake District highlights. You'll visit Grasmere Lake, Rydal Water, Rydal Hall and Wordsworth's Dove Cottage on this walk which runs for just over 5 miles.
The walk starts in the centre of Grasmere where you can visit the grave of poet William Wordsworth who is buried in the churchyard of St. Oswald's Church. Right next to the church is the famous Grasmere Gingerbread Shop where you can expect a long queue in the holiday months! From the church you can follow Red Bank Country Lane past the Garden Centre to the lake. The lane bends round the western side of the lake, passing the lakeside Faeryland tea rooms where you can also hire little boats to take out on the lake.
Eventually you will come to a footpath heading down to the lake on your left. You can then follow a lovely lakeside path or climb up to Loughrigg Terrace for great views down to the lake. There's also the option here to head south and climb to Loughrigg Fell for wide ranging views of the nearby lakes and fells. At the eastern end of the lake there is a nice little beach where you will often see people relaxing on a summer's day.
The route continues east towards Rydal Water where you can drop down to the lakeside path. At the eastern end of the water you pass through woodland before crossing the River Rothay to take you up to Rydal Hall. The Grade II listed house is well worth exploring. There's lovely formal gardens with a fountain, a nice cafe next to Rydal Beck and a waterfall with a viewing platform. It's a good spot to stop for refreshments with outdoor seating next to the beck.
From Rydal Hall you pick up a section of the Coffin Route. The old path runs from Ambleside to Grasmere and is so called because it was used to convey coffins on their final journey to St Oswalds Church in Grasmere. You follow it west past Nab Scar to Town End where you will find Dove Cottage, the home of poet William Wordsworth from 1799 to 1808.  During this period, William wrote much of the poetry for which he is remembered today, including 'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud'. You can explore the fascinating old house and then browse the adjacent museum where you will find exhibits, manuscripts, landscapes and portraits.
The final section of the walk takes you back to the village, passing a series of pretty shops and galleries on the way. View Full Details>>
Haweswater10 miles (16.5 km)Follow the lakeside trail around the beautiful Haweswater Reservoir on this circular walk in the Lake District. The area is one of the quieter parts of the national park so you can expect a delightfully peaceful walk on good paths. The path runs around the lake for just over 10 miles with some woodland sections along the way.
You can start the walk from the car park at the southern end of the lake. Then head along the western side on a good footpath with great views across the water to the surrounding fells. Along the way you will pass pockets of woodland, Measand Beck and The Forces waterfalls. Here you can take a detour and climb along the beck to Bampton Common.
The route continues along the lakeside to the Haweswater Dam and Burnbanks where you will pass the RSPB Haweswater Nature Reserve. Look out for birds including Buzzard, Peregrine and Redstart in this area.
At Naddle Bridge you cross the Haweswater Beck and start the return leg on the eastern side of the water. You'll pass Naddle Forest, Guerness Wood and Mardale Banks before returning to the car park.
The northern tip of the Kentmere Horseshoe circular walk passes close to the lake at Harter Fell. If you climb up to Harter Fell from the parking area you can pick up the trail which takes you on a tour of the range of fells in the upper Kentmere valley. Just to the west you can visit Blea Water, Brothers Water and Hayeswater. Wainwright's Coast to Coast long distance route also passes the reservoir so you can pick this up to extend your walk.
The climb to High Street also starts from the Mardale Head car park.
You can virtually explore the eastern side of the reservoir using the google street view link below. Cyclists can enjoy a ride along this side of the water on the quiet country lane. View Full Details>>
Cow Green Reservoir and Cauldron Snout10 miles (16 km)This walk takes you along the beautiful Cow Green Reservoir to the spectacular Cauldron Snout waterfall in the North Pennines AONB.
You start off at the car park at Cow Green Reservoir and head 2 miles south to the waterfall, passing the impressive Cow Green Dam on the way. Cauldron Snout is a very powerful waterfall on three levels. At 200 yards (180 m) long, it is reckoned to be the longest waterfall in England. At the waterfall you have the option of heading back to the car park or continuing along the Pennine Way and the River Tees towards Langdon Beck. The path runs right along the river to Sayer's Hill and Harwood Beck with plenty of wild moorland scenery to enjoy. View Full Details>>
Coniston to Langdale11 miles (17 km)This is the second leg of the Cumbria Way taking you from Coniston to Langdale.
The walk starts in the village of Coniston and takes you to the picturesque Tarn Hows, Skelwith Bridge, the village of Elterwater and then onto Langdale.
There's much to enjoy on this leg including Elterwater Lake, Skelwith Force Waterfalls and fabulous views of Langdale Pikes. View Full Details>>
Caldbeck8 miles (12.5 km)The pretty Cumbrian village of Caldbeck has some nice walking trails to try along the Cald Beck. There's attractive riverside woodland, rushing waterfalls and good climbs to the nearby fells to enjoy.
This figure of eight walk uses a section of the long distance Cumbria Way and other public footpaths to explore the area to the east and west of the village. The western section is very pretty, taking you along the Cald Beck to the Howk where there are a series of pretty waterfalls. It's a delightful area with lots of little streamside cottages, rushing water, limestone gorge scenery and the remains of an old waterwheel at Bobbin Mill. Just before reaching Whelpo the route climbs away from the river to climb Brownrigg. At nearly 1000ft the hill gives great views over the surrounding countryside.
The eastern section of the trail follows the Cald Beck and the River Caldew towards Sebergham. You then climb to Parkhead for more nice views, before returning to the village.
To extend your walking in the area you can head south along the Cumbria Way to the Caldbeck Fells and climb High Pike for more great views over north Lakeland.
Heading south west along the Cumbria Way will take you to Bassenthwaite Lake.
Also nearby is Greystoke Forest where there are miles of good mountain bike trails and footpaths to try. View Full Details>>
Easedale Tarn6 miles (9 km)Enjoy a walk to the lovely Easedale Tarn in the Lake District. The walk begins in the popular village of Grasmere and follows the Easedale Road towards the pretty Easedale Beck. You then join footpaths taking you up to the tarn, passing the beautiful Sourmilk Gill waterfalls on the way. The tarn is in a lovely spot between Tarn Crag to the north and Blea Rigg to the south. It is generally quite a peaceful spot and a great escape from the often busy Grasmere town. There is a footpath around the tarn though this may be quite boggy. From the tarn, you return via Cockly Crag, Stenners Crag and Jackdaw Crag, before rejoining the Easedale Road back into Grasmere.
Another option is to continue to the nearby Stickle Tarn and Dungeon Ghyll Waterfall. You can do this by following the footpath west from Easedale Tarn rather than returning to Grasmere. View Full Details>>
Skelwith Bridge3 miles (4.6 km)With the long distance Cumbria Way passing through the village and a series of beatiful waterfalls to visit, the village of Skelwith Bridge is a great place for walkers. The walk to Loughrigg Tarn and the delightful riverside stroll to Elterwater are especially popular.
This circular walk visits some of the highlights of the area including Colwith Force Waterfall, Skelwith Force waterfall, Elterwater, the River Brathay and Great Langdale Beck.
The walk starts from the bridge at Skelwith Bridge. Head west along the river passing the lovely riverside tea rooms before coming to the impressive Skelwith Force waterfall. Though small the falls are very powerful and can be seen up close from the viewing area. At the falls you pick up a section of the Cumbria Way to first take you along the Brathay and then Great Langdale Beck to Elterwater. It's a lovely area with peaceful woodland opening out to open countryside along the beck. There's great views of the Langdale Fells as you approach the little village of Elterwater where you can enjoy refreshments at the nice pub which has outdoor seating.
The route then climbs through Sawrey's Wood and Fletcher's Wood to Colwith Force Waterfall. The falls drop 40 feet over several stages and are a spectacular sight when in full spate.
At the falls you pick up the Cumbria Way again and descend back to Skelwith Bridge. There's lovely views here back down to the river and lake.
To extend the walk keep heading west along the Cumbria Way and you can enjoy a splendid climb up Dungeon Ghyll falls to Stickle Tarn. View Full Details>>
Coffin Route-Ambleside to Grasmere4 miles (6 km)Follow the Coffin Route from Ambleside to Grasmere on this lovely walk in the Lake District. The walk is fairly easy with only a short climb and a well defined, signposted route. The path is so called because it was used to convey coffins on their final journey to St Oswalds Church in Grasmere.
You start off in Ambleside and follow the A591 to Scandale Bridge where you leave the road and head through Rydal Park to Rydal Hall. This 19th century mansion has formal gardens and the pretty Rydal Falls where you can enter 'The Grot' - an 18th century summerhouse designed for viewing the waterfalls. Rydal Hall also has a very good tea shop so it's a good place to stop for refreshments on the route. Just up the hill to the right you will find Rydal Mount -  the home of the poet William Wordsworth from 1813 to his death in 1850.
The route continues west passing along the lower part of Nab Scar with lovely views of Rydal Water. You soon come to Dove Cottage where Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy lived from December 1799 to May 1808. William wrote much of the poetry for which he is remembered today, including 'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud' at Dove Cottage. It's now open to the public - you can enjoy a guided tour of the house and visit the adjacent musueum which has fantastic exhibitions about Wordsworth's work and life.
The final section of the walk takes you past Grasmere lake and into Grasmere village where you can see the grave of Wordsworth in the peaceful graveyard of St Oswalds church. View Full Details>>
Fleetwith Pike4 miles (6 km)This walk takes you to the 648 metres (2,126 feet) summit of this imposing fell in the Lake District. This circular walk starts at Gatesgarth in the Buttermere valley and climbs steeply to the summit via Fleetwith Edge. From here there are wonderful views of the nearby Pillar and Great Gable fells and the lakes of Crummock Water, Loweswater and Buttermere. From the summit the route then descends to Bell Crags, passing Honistor Crag on the way. You continue to Wanscale Bottom, passing waterfalls and the pretty Wanscale Beck.
It's a steep and challenging climb to the summit but with an easier, more gradual descent. View Full Details>>
Pillar from Wasdale Head7 miles (11.5 km)Climb to this prominent Lakeland Fell on this popular circular route. The mountain stands at 892 metres (2,927 feet) making it the eighth highest in the Lake District. On the walk you'll enjoy splendid views of the valleys of Ennerdale and Wasdale.
The fell is typically climbed from Wasdale Head where there is a popular car park. From here you head north to the rushing water of Ritson's Force Waterfalls. You continue to Gatherstone Head, crossing Gatherstone Beck on the way. The ascent continues along the Black Sail Pass before turning west to the Pillar summit via Looking Stead. The summit is wide and grassy with splendid views of most of the major Lakeland fells. You can also see Loweswater and Ennerdale Water. Nearby is Pillar Rock, considered one of the wonders of the Lake District. The striking rock is popular with rock climbers and located just to the north of the Pillar summit.
After taking in the fine views you descend to Scoat Fell. From here the full horseshoe of the Western Fells can be seen. The descent continues to Red Pike fell, passing Scoat Tarn before coming to Dore Head. The final section takes you around Dorehead Screes and along Mosedale Beck before returning to the Wasdale Head car park.
To continue your walking in the area you could climb to Scafell Pike. Scafell is the highest point in England and is often climbed from Wasdale Head.
Just to the north of Pillar is Ennerdale Forest where there are footpaths leading to the lovely Ennerdale Water. View Full Details>>
Ashford in the Water1 miles (2 km)The pretty Peak District village of Ashford in the Water has some nice walking trails to try along the River Wye. It's a picture postcard area with quaint stone cottages, nice pubs and lovely views of the river and the old Sheep Wash Bridge. This short walk takes you from Ashford in the Water to the nearby town of Bakewell. It's about a one mile walk, passing Ashford Lake and Lumford Mill with river views on the way. You can return the same way or get the bus back from Bakewell. View Full Details>>
Pooley Bridge to Glenridding10 miles (16 km)This fine, lakeside walk takes you from one end of Ullswater to the other. It's about a 10 mile walk, taking in some of the best scenery of the Lake District. Along the way you'll pass peaceful woods, rushing waterfalls, pretty becks and spectacular mountains. The walk is generally fairly easy going but there are some small climbs along the way.
The walk starts from the village of Pooley Bridge, located at the north eastern end of the lake. The first section heads south along the lake to Sharrow Bay, passing underneath Barton Fell on the way. At Sharrow Bay you can visit the country house, enjoy refreshments and explore the beautiful formal gardens.
The route continues to Howton where you can catch the famous 'Ullswater Steamers' which will take you across the lake. At the little hamlet there is also the option of climbing Hallin Fell for wonderful views across the water to the surrounding fells.
The route continues through Hallinhag Wood and Sandwick, crossing the Boredale Beck as you go. You then pass the Scalehow Waterfall before coming to Birk Fell and Silver Bay.
You continue south to the village of Patterdale, passing the Devil's Chimney and Blowick Bay on the way. This section passes under Patterdale Common and Place Fell, which is another great viewpoint.
The final section takes you through Patterdale, crossing the Grisedale Bridge over the Grisedale Beck before heading past the woodland under Raven Crag and finishing at Glenridding. View Full Details>>
Snowdon Watkin Path7 miles (12 km)The Watkin Path to the Snowdon summit is considered to be the most challenging of the available routes as it starts from the lowest elevation. It is, however, very pretty with attractive woodland and waterfalls near the start.
You can start your walk from the good sized Nant Gwynant car park off the A498. Then head if you head south over the Afon Glaslyn you will soon come to the start of the Watkin path on your right. You head north along the path, passing through woodland before a waterside stretch along the Afon Cwm Llan. You'll pass some lovely waterfalls before coming to the Gladstone Rock. The rock is dedicated to the Prime Minister William Gladstone, who opened the path in 1892.
The path continues north from the rock with great views over the Glaslyn estuary and Llyn Glaslyn lake below. The next section from Bwlch y Saethau  is quite challenging with a very steep incline and loose stones. Shortly after you reach the summit where you are rewarded with magnificent views towards Ireland, the Isle of Man and the Lake District.
There's several other routes across Snowdon to try. If you would like to do a circular walk then the Snowdon Horseshoe is a good option.
For a longer but less demanding climb try the Llanberis Path.
The beautiful Llyn Gwynant and Llyn Dinas are also very close to the start of this route. You could visit these two lovely lakes from the same car park.
You can virtually climb to the summit using the google street view link below! View Full Details>>
Little Langdale5 miles (8 km)A circular walk around the beautiful Little Langdale in the Lake District. The walk visits some of the highlights of the area including Little Langdale Tarn, the River Brathay and the striking Cathedral Cavern. The route runs for about 5 miles on reasonably flat paths with a moderate climb on the return leg.
Start the walk from the car park in Low Tilberthwaite, next to the Yewdale Beck and below the Furness Fells. From here you can pick up paths heading north along the Pierce How Beck to Moss Rigg Wood. Around here you can visit the intriguing Cathedral Quarries. The expansive cave system includes the 40ft high Cathedral Cavern which can be reached from a tunnel maintained by the National Trust.
After exploring the caves the route then passes along the River Brathay before crossing the water and heading north to the village of Little Langdale. Here you can enjoy refreshments at The Three Shires Inn which was built in 1872 and is named after the Three Shires Stone two miles away. There's a delightful garden to sit out in and enjoy fine views of the Tilberthwaite Fells.
From the village you can pick up a country lane to take you around the back of Little Langdale Tarn. There's lovely views down to the water where you may see great crested grebe if you bring your binoculars.
Follow the lane to Fell Foot Bridge where you cross the river and the Greenburn Beck. The route then heads south along tracks, passing the Atkinson Coppice before returning to the car park. View Full Details>>
Eskdale13 miles (20.5 km)Explore beautiful Eskdale and enjoy waterside paths along the rushing River Esk on this varied route. Along the way there's lots of waterfalls, beautiful Lakeland scenery and fabulous views from the high points.
Eskdale is one of the quieter areas of the Lake District so expect a peaceful and beautiful valley walk.
You can start the walk from Dalegarth where there is a car park and a train station on the Ravenglass & Eskdale Railway. From here you can pick up the footpaths along the river passing Gill Force waterfall. The walk takes you along the river to Brotherikeld before climbing to Cam Spout Crag, close to Scafell Pike. You then follow a splendid elevated path to Silverybield Crag before descending to Scale Gill. The route then finishes by following the river back to Dalegarth. View Full Details>>
Whernside8 miles (13 km)Climb to the highest point in North Yorkshire on this challenging walk in the Yorkshire Dales. Whernside is one of the Yorkshire Three Peaks, with the others being Ingleborough and Pen y ghent.
This circular walk begins at Ribblehead and heads to the Blue Clay Ridge via the magnificent Ribblehead Viaduct. You continue your ascent passing the pretty Little Dale Beck and Force Gill where you can see a series of waterfalls. The route then passes Knoutberry Hull and a small tarn before arriving at the 736 m (2,415 ft) Whernside summit. From here there are fantastic views over the Yorkshire Dales, the Lake District and Morecambe Bay.
From the summit you descend to Broadrake before crossing the lovely Winterscales Beck. You then follow the beck to Gunnerfleet Farm, and on to the finish point at Ribblehead.
To extend your walking in the area you could try our easy circular walk around the magnificent Ribblehead Viaduct. The Grade II* listed structure is one of the England's greatest monuments to Victorian engineering.
The long distance Dales Way and Ribble Way both pass near to the mountain so you could pick up these splendid trails to further explore the area. View Full Details>>
Circular Walk around Kettlewell7 miles (11.5 km)This challenging circular walk climbs to Great Whernside, Blackfell Top and Blackfell Dike from the popular village of Kettlewell, in the Nidderdale area of the Yorkshire Dales.
The route starts in the village and heads along the lovely Dowber Gill Beck where there's a series of pretty waterfalls. You continue to the Providence Pot cave where you turn left to Hag Dike. Turn right here and the path will take you directly up to the Great Whernside summit. It's a splendid viewpoint with views to the Lake District Fells, Pendle Hill, Wharfedale, Buckden Pike and the Pennines.
After soaking in the summit views the route descends to Blackfell Top, Black Dike and Tor Dike, where there are more nice views down the valley to enjoy.
The final section takes you along Starbotton Road before turning left down Top Mere Road. Follow the track for about 1.5 miles and it will return you to Kettlewell.
For a more direct path to the summit try the Great Whernside Walk.
The Dales Way long distance trail runs through the village. You could follow it north through Wharfedale to extend your exercise. It's a lovely riverside path which will take you to the village of Buckden where you can try the climb to Buckden Pike.
Heading in the other direction will take you to Grassington. You can see more details on the Grassington to Kettlewell Walk. View Full Details>>
Rivelin Valley Nature Trail2 miles (4 km)This walk takes you through the lovely Rivelin River valley in Sheffield. The nature trail runs along the side of the rushing river which is surrounded by attractive woodland. Along the way you'll pass a series of weirs, and little waterfalls with a variety of interesting flora and fauna.
The walk starts at the car park off the Rivelin Valley Road and picks up the waterside trail to the pretty Rivelin Park. The park has a cafe, toilets and play area. You then follow the riverside path for about 2.5 miles with pretty ponds and stepping stones to look out for on the way. The area has a rich milling history with a series of dams and wheel pits dotted along the route.
To extend your walking in the area you can head east to the pretty Rivelin Dams. Here you can pick up a delightful waterside trail through the Wyming Brook Nature Reserve. This will lead you to the Redmires Reservoirs. These three interestingly shaped reservoirs have a great circular walking trail with woodland paths, climbs across the Peak District Moors and a wide variety of wildfowl and waders to look out for on the water. View Full Details>>
Rivington Pike2 miles (3 km)This popular walk climbs to the Rivington Pike viewpoint in the lovely Rivington Country Park, near Bolton. It's a circular hike of just under 2 miles, with a moderate climb to the  1,191 feet (363 metres) summit of the prominent local landmark. There's much to enjoy with a section through the remains of Lever Park and wonderful views over the West Pennine Moors.
You start the walk at the Pigeon Tower car park, located about a mile north of the hill top, on Belmont Road. From here you can pick up the footpaths heading south, through the woodland and up to the lovely Rivington Terraced Gardens. In the gardens there are a number of interesting features to see. You'll pass the dovecote of Pigeon Tower which stands at the northwestern edge of the gardens. Italian in style, the tower was built in 1910 by Lord Leverhulme as part of his extensive Rivington estate.
Paths will also take you past the pretty Japanese Gardens with its tranquil lake and then up to the Great Ravine. Here you'll find a series of delightful waterfalls flowing over man-made cascades, down to an area known as The Dell. It's an atmospheric and peaceful place with the shady woodland and remains of the old estate making for a varied and memorable climb.
After leaving the gardens you follow a series of steps up to the Rivington Pike summit where you'll find the Pike Tower, which is a Grade II listed building. There's also great views to the coast, Blackpool Tower, the Lake District mountains, the Welsh mountains and as far as the Isle of Man on the clearest days.
After taking in the views the walk descends on different paths through Lever Park. View Full Details>>
Cumbria Way70 miles (112 km)Travel through the beautiful Lake District National Park on this stunning walk. The path runs from Ulverston to Carlisle, passing dramatic mountainous scenery, beautiful lakes and a series of delightful Cumbrian towns and villages.
We have split this trail into five stages of around 15 miles each in length.
Stage 1: Ulverston to Coniston
Stage 2: Coniston to Langdale
Stage 3: Langdale to Keswick
Stage 4: Keswick to Caldbeck
Stage 5: Caldbeck to Carlisle View Full Details>>
Pennine Way268 miles (431 km)This fabulous 268 mile path takes you through three of England's finest national parks. You start near Edale in the beautiful Derbyshire Peak District and head north towards the Yorkshire Dales National Park. The final section takes you over Hadrian's Wall in the stunning Northumberland National Park before crossing the England-Scotland border and finishing in the village of Kirk Yetholm in Scotland.
Though the path is often challenging you're rewarded with some of the most breathtaking views in the country. Highlights on the path include the beautiful Malham Cove, the heather moorland of the Marsden Moor Estate, the Malham Tarn Estate and the stunning Kisdon Force waterfall in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. You'll also enjoy a waterside section along the River Tees in Teesdale which leads to Low Force Watefall and High Force Waterfall.
The path also passes through Bronte country in West Yorkshire where you can visit the Bronte Waterfall and Top Withens. View Full Details>>
Bakewell10 miles (15.5 km)The market town of Bakewell makes and excellent base for exploring the Derbyshire Dales area of the Peak District National Park.
This long circular walk visits some of the villages, parks, woods and hills surrounding the town. There's lots to see with riverside paths, historic halls and beautiful countryside.
The walk starts in the centre of the town and then climbs past Bakewell Hill Golf Club towards Calton Pasture where there are nice pockets of woodland and good views of the surrounding area. On this section you climb to a height of well over 800ft with a trig point on Calton Pasture to look out for. From here you descend to New Piece Wood before reaching the village of Edensor. The little village is noted for the Grade I listed St Peter's Church. Many of the Dukes of Devonshire, are buried in the churchyard. There is also the Cavendish Memorial, an early 17th century church monument to Henry and William Cavendish, commemorating the sons of Sir William Cavendish and Bess of Hardwick. Near the church you can enjoy refreshments at the delightful Edensor Tea Cottage.
The walk continues to the nearby Chatsworth Park. The magnificent park is one of the highlights of the Peak District and well worth visiting if you have time. In the park you will find 1000 acres of parkland and gardens with views of the River Derwent, woodland trails and fallow deer.
At Chatsworth you can pick up the Derwent Valley Heritage Way and enjoy a waterside walk south along the River Derwent. On this section you pass Calton Lees before coming to the village of Rowsley. The little village is notable as the point where the River Wye flows into the River Derwent. There's also the Grade-II listed Peacock hotel, which dates from the middle of the 17th century. The 19th century St Katherine’s Church is also noteworthy. The 7th Duke of Rutland laid coins of every value, from a sovereign to half a farthing in the foundation of the church.
After leaving Rowsley the walk heads west through Manners Wood before coming to Haddon Hall and Park. The fine country house on the River Wye is one of the seats of the Duke of Rutland. The hall originates from the 11th century with the medieval and Tudor hall dating from the 13th to the 17th centuries. Haddon Hall was used as the setting for Thornfield Hall in the 2006 BBC television version of Jane Eyre, starring Toby Stephens and Ruth Wilson. You can explore the lovely grounds with Elizabethan terraced gardens and views over the River Wye. You can generally visit the hall during the summer months.
The final section of the walk follows the River Wye, back into Bakewell where you can enjoy refreshments at one of the many pubs and cafes. View Full Details>>

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