GPS Cycle and Walking Routes

Knightwood Oak

1 miles (1 km)

Visit the largest oak tree in the New Forest on this short, accessible walk. You start off at the Knightwood Oak car park and follow a nice gravel path to the impressive tree. It's over 500 years old, has a girth of 7.38 metres (24.2ft) and is still growing!
The Knightwood Oak trail is located just a few miles west of Lyndhurst. You could extend your walk by trying the New Forest Reptile Centre Trail which is less than a mile away. You could follow our Lyndhurst Circular Walk to visit the centre and the lovely Bolderwood Deer Sanctuary.

Postcode

SO43 7NH - Please note: Postcode may be approximate for some rural locations

Knightwood Oak OS Map - Mobile GPS OS Map with Location tracking

Knightwood Oak Open Street Map - Mobile GPS Map with Location tracking

Further Information and Other Local Ideas

To the north of the oak you'll find the Warwickslade Cutting where there is a pretty stream and more nice trails.
For more walking ideas in the area see the New Forest Walks page.

Photos

The Eagle Oak, Knightwood Inclosure, New Forest - geograph.org.uk - 271589

The Eagle Oak, Knightwood Inclosure. This oak is one of the largest in the New Forest. In 1810 a New Forest Keeper shot the last Sea Eagle from its branches.

Knightwood Oak in early September - geograph.org.uk - 316894

Knightwood Oak in early September. The Oak has been surrounded by a picket fence. Whatever its intended purpose, it has prevented ponies from grazing around the base of the tree and various samplings and bushes have had the chance to grow.

The Deputy Surveyor's Oak, New Forest - geograph.org.uk - 316898

The Deputy Surveyor's Oak. The plaque reads: "This tree, a sapling from the Knightwood Oak, has been planted to commemorate the contribution and dedication in the management of the New Forest by Donn Small, Forestry Commission Deputy Surveyor 1971-1983".

Coniferous trees in the Knightwood Inclosure, New Forest - geograph.org.uk - 32726

Coniferous trees in the Knightwood Inclosure. A typical scene within the Inclosure: conifer plantations separated by tracks, some of which are designated off-road cycling routes. According to Terry Heathcote's "Discovering the New Forest", the last white-tailed eagle in the Forest was shot in this grid square in 1810.

Warwickslade Cutting, the new stream flows - geograph.org.uk - 1480713

Warwickslade Cutting, the new stream flows. Located just north of the oak.

Silver birch on the edge of Brinken Wood, New Forest - geograph.org.uk - 86996

Silver birch on the edge of Brinken Wood, New Forest. These silver birch trees are typically found on the edges of open woodland as they are quick to take seed and grow. The path from the footbridge over the Warwickslade Cutting leads northeast through the wood to the footbridge over Highland Water.

Video

GPS Files

GPX File

Knightwood Oak.gpx (On Desktop:Right Click>'Save As. On Ipad/Iphone:Click and hold>Share>Save to Files')

Memory Map Route

Knightwood Oak.mmo (On Desktop:Right Click>'Save As. On Ipad/Iphone:Click and hold >Share>Save to Files)