GPS Cycle and Walking Routes


Coastal Walks

With thousands of miles of stunning coastline the UK is wonderful place for coastal walking. We've picked some of the finest stretches of coast for walkers to enjoy.

Please use the links below to view full route information including descriptions, elevation profiles, interactive maps and GPS downloads.

You can also view an overview map of all the routes in the using the Coastal Walk Map


Route NamePhotoDistanceDescription
Abermawr Woods2 miles (2.5 km)This short walk takes you along Abermawr Beach and through Abermawr Woods on the Pembrokeshire Coast. You'll pass along the pretty shingle beach and enjoy peaceful woodland trails in the adjacent wood. It's a lovely spot with great coastal views and bluebells in the wood in the spring. Parking is available at the turning circle near the beach from which this walk starts. View Full Details>>
Amroth and Colby Woodland Garden2 miles (4 km)Enjoy a walk along the lovely coastline at Amroth and visit the National Trust's Colby Woodland Garden.
The walk starts near the sea front in Amroth and follows a footpath north to the delightful Colby Woodland Garden. Here you will find 8 acres of woodland, widlflower meadows and gardens with a variety of plants and flowers such as azaleas, bluebells, camellias, magnolias, rhododendrons. In the walled garden there is a Victorian Gothic inspired gazebo and fine Japanese maples. The wildflower meadow has pretty streams and ponds and there are peaceful woodland trails in the woodland garden.
The secluded wooded valley is home to a variety of wildlife. Look out for Dippers, bats, otters, frogs and toads.
After leaving the gardens you can return to the sea front on the same path and then enjoy a stroll along the prom in Amroth. View Full Details>>
Ardnamurchan Peninsula6 miles (9 km)Explore the stunning Ardnamurchan Peninsula on this breathtaking walk on the west coast of Scotland. The circular walk starts at the car park at Portuairk and takes you along the coast to beautiful white sand beaches with turquoise water. You continue on to the Ardnamurchan Point lighthouse which is commonly described as the most westerly point of the British mainland although the nearby Corrachadh Mor is a few metres further west. The route then returns to the start point on country lanes, passing Loch Grigadale on the way. View Full Details>>
Ayrshire Coastal Path100 miles (161 km)A walk along the beautiful Ayrshire Coast from Glenapp Kirk, just north of Stranaraer, to Skelmorlie, near Greenock. The route passes Ayr, Prestwick, Saltcoats, Troon and Largs. As well as the fabulous coastal scenery there is the beautiful backdrop of the mountains of Arran across the Firth of Clyde to enjoy. There is also a variety of wildlife including 135 species of bird, seals, otters, roe deer and foxes.
The walk is waymarked with a green and white disc. View Full Details>>
Baggy Point5 miles (7.5 km)This popular walk in the North Devon AONB visits Baggy Point, a dramatic headland with wonderful coastal views over the beautiful Croyde Bay. The area is covered in interesting plants including various wildflowers, yellow gorse, lichens and moss. It's also great for wildlife with birds including herring gull, fulmar, shag, cormorant and peregrine. You can head off the path to some rock pools where you may see seals in the summer. The area around Baggy Point is designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) for its interesting geological features.
This circular walk starts from the National Trust car park at Croyde Bay. You then head along the coast path to Baggy Point with great views over Croyde Bay. You can then continue round the headland towards Puttsborough, before following footpaths through the countryside back to the car park.
If you'd like to extend your walk then you could head south along the coast to the nearby Braunton Burrows Nature Reserve. The reserve covers nearly 900 hectares making it the second largest dune system in England. Alternativley you could head north along the beautiful Woolacombe Sands, voted Britain's Best Beach in 2015 by TripAdvisor. A walk through the sand dunes of Woolacombe Warren will take you to the village where there are plenty of nice places to eat. View Full Details>>
Baiter Park2 miles (3 km)Enjoy a cycle or walk through this harbourside park in Poole. The route follows a nice surfaced path along the coast from Baiter Park to Whitecliff Park with great views over Parkstone Bay to Brownsea Island. It follows National Cycle Network Route 25 and is suitable for families looking for a traffic free cycle ride.
The route starts from the Baiter car park and heads east along the waterside path. You'll see lots of sailboats in the water as you make your way to Whitecliff Harbourside Park where you'll pass the marina. There's also great views towards the Purbeck Hills and lots of birdlife to look out for on the water.
You can extend your outing by heading west to Poole Quay and continuing to Holes Bay and the lovely Upton Country Park. Also nearby is Poole Park which has a large boating lake and a miniature railway. View Full Details>>
Barton's Point Coastal Park5 miles (8.5 km)Enjoy a leisurely stroll or ride along the Queenborough Lines canal and the Isle of Sheppey Coast on this circular route in Bartons Point Coastal Park. The route begins on the coast near Sheerness train station and follows the canal path before returning to the start point through Minster Park. View Full Details>>
Beachy Head4 miles (6 km)This exhilarating walk takes you along the highest chalk sea cliff in Britain, at Beachy Head on the South Downs. The cliffs rise to a height of 162 metres (531 ft) with fabulous views along the coast to West Sussex and Dungeness in Kent.
You can start your walk from the good sized car park on Beachy Head Road. From here you can pick up the trails on to the The South Downs Way which will take you along the headland. You could also start the walk from the nearby town of Eastbourne and follow the Wealdway along the beach from the town centre. See our Eastbourne to Beachy Head Walk for details and a map.
As well as the magnificent views there's some lovely countryside to explore inland. Look out for lots of wildflowers in the summer and a variety of birdlife which includes Lapwing, Skylark and Perigrin Falcon.
After your walk you can enjoy refreshments at the Beachy Head cliff top pub which is next to the car park.
To extend your walk you can continue west along the coastal path to Birling Gap and the Belle Tout Lighthouse. Beyond there is the fantastic Seven Sisters Country Park at Cuckmere Haven. Here you will find more great cycling and walking trails along the coast and the River Cuckmere. View Full Details>>
Beadnell to Low Newton4 miles (6.5 km)A popular coastal walk from the Northumberland village of Beadnell to Low Newton By Sea. It's a lovely area with splendid views over Beadnell Bay and a visit to the National Trust owned Newton Pool Nature Reserve. The delightful village is a popular tourist spot situated in the Northumberland Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. As such it's a great base for exploring the area on foot.
The walk starts at Beadnell Harbour where there's lots of little fishing boats and an attractive beach with sand dunes. You then pick up the footpaths and head south along the lovely Beadnell Bay with its 2 mile long sandy beach. The area contains a nationally important colony of little tern and the largest mainland colony of Arctic tern in the United Kingdom.
After passing the bay you come to Newton Pool. The nature reserve has a number of hides where you can look out for a variety of water loving birds on the small lakes. At the coastal Newton Haven you may also see seals.
This walk finishes at the reserve but you can continue south along footpaths to Embleton Bay and the impressive Dunstanburgh Castle. The dramatic ruins are now a popular tourist attraction, standing on a remote headland with fine views of Embleton Bay and Craster.
Head north to visit working fishing port of Seahouses, which also serves the tourist trade, being the embarkation point for visits to the Farne Islands.Seahouses to Beadnell
The long distance St Oswald's Way also passes through the area and is another good option for extending your walk. View Full Details>>
Beaumaris Castle and Coast2 miles (3 km)Visit the fascinating 13th century Beaumaris Castle and then enjoy a coastal section on this walk in the town of Beaumaris in Anglesey. The castle was built by Edward I towards the end of the 13th century in order to stamp his authority on the Welsh. However, it was never fully completed with money and supplies running out before the fortifications were finished. It's a hugely impressive sight with UNESCO considering Beaumaris to be one of 'the finest examples of late 13th century and early 14th century military architecture in Europe'. They have classed it as a World Heritage site.
After exploring the castle you can enjoy a walk along the Anglesey Coast Path towards Fryars Bay. There's great views over the Menai Strait towards Lavan Sands, Ceredigion and Snowdonia.
From Beaumaris you can take a boat trip to visit Puffin Island.
You can extend your walk by continuing north along the Anglesey Coast Path to Penmon Point. Here you'll find the Trwyn Du Lighthouse and great views towards Puffin Island, Great Orme and Snowdon. There's also nice pebble beaches and seals and dolphins to look out for. View Full Details>>
Bedruthan Steps5 miles (8.5 km)This walk takes you to a stunningly beautiful stretch of Cornish Coast where you will find the Bedruthan Steps. This series of large rocks along the beach are a popular tourist attraction and very photogenic. There are great views towards Carnewas Island and Trescore Islands to enjoy. The area is also covered with attractive wildflowers which attract a variety of butterflies and birds.
The walk starts from the National Trust Carnewas car park and heads to the coast path. You then pass the Bedruthan Steps said to have been used as stepping stones by the giant Bedruthan. There is a steep staircase down to a lovely secluded beach but be mindful of the changing tides if you take this detour.
The walk continues to Porth Mear where there is a lovely cove with lots of pretty rock pools. You can continue along the coast to Porthcothan where where there is another gorgeous bay and beach. You can also stop for refreshments in the little village.
To return to the car park you can just follow the coast all the way back or take a nice detour at Porth Mear towards Pentire Farm. This section will take you through a pretty valley with streams and attractive countryside.
The Bedruthan Steps are located about 6 miles north of Newquay so you could follow the South West Coast Path to the steps if you would prefer to come on foot. View Full Details>>
Bempton Cliffs7 miles (12 km)Bempton Cliffs RSPB Nature Reserve is considered the best place in England to watch seabirds. Start species include Puffins, Gannets, Kittiwakes, Guillemots and Razorbills. In the summer months it is a spectacular sight with hundreds of thousands of birds around the cliffs. The RSPB have created several cliff-edge viewing platforms from which to observe the action.
This walk starts at the reserve car park and heads along the coast in an easterly direction before turning back and heading west towards Buckton Cliffs. A lovely footpath then heads away from the coast and into the countryside towards Bempton. A country lane from Bempton then takes you back to the car park. As such the walk provides both great coastal scenery and views of the North York Moors countryside.
You can easily continue your walk along the East Riding Heritage Way towards the wonderful Flamborough Head. View Full Details>>
Berwickshire Coastal Path30 miles (48 km)Follow the Berwickshire Coastal Path from Berwick on Tweed in Northumberland, to Cockburnspath, in the Scottish Borders. There's some spectacular coastal scenery to enjoy as you pass along the Northumberland and Scottish cliff tops. There are also a series of pretty coastal villages with delightful harbours including Burnmouth, Eyemouth, St Abbs and Cove. View Full Details>>
Birling Gap2 miles (3 km)Visit Birling Gap and enjoy a splendid coastal walk to the Belle Tout lighthouse. The area is run by the National Trust so there are great facilities with a good sized car park, cafe, shop and visitor centre on the cliff top.  This walk starts from the Birling Gap car park just a mile south of East Dean at the end of Birling Gap Road. From here you can pick up the trails along the The South Downs Way to the lighthouse. Belle Tout has been used many times in films and tv because of the spectacular location. It has been called 'Britain's most famous inhabited lighthouse'. There's fantastic views along to the nearby Beachy Head and 500 acres of open chalk grassland with a wide variety of butterflies and wildflowers to look out for. 
To extend your walk just head east along the The South Downs Way to Beachy Head. Here you can walk across the highest chalk sea cliff in Britain with fabulous views and Perigrin Falcons to look out for. Continuing east from the headland will take you into Eastbourne.
If you head west you will soon come to Seven Sisters Country Park where you can explore the beautiful Cuckmere Haven on foot or by bike.
The village of East Dean is also nearby so you could start the walk from here and follow bridleways south to the coast. Just beyond East Dean you will find Friston Forest which has miles of good mountain bike trails and footpaths. You can visit these locations on our splendid South Downs Circular Walk which starts at the Birling Gap car park and takes you on a tour of the surrounding area. View Full Details>>
Bishopston Valley2 miles (3 km)This walk takes you through a beautiful wooded valley to the stunning beach at Pwll Du Bay. It's a delightful tranquil area with the running water of the river and interesting flora and fauna.
The walk starts in Kittle and follows footpaths south through the Bishopston Valley. The paths runs along the river which is surrounded by woodland and little caves. You continue through wet meadows grazed by cattle and home to various wildflowers before coming to the delightfully secluded Pwll Du Bay. Here you can enjoy a stroll along the beach and take in the wonderful coastal views of the Gower.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could head a mile or so west and visit the ruins of Pennard Castle and explore the beautiful Pennard Burrows. If you head east along the coast towards Swansea you will find the Mumbles where there are more nice coastal walking paths.
The valley is located just a few miles south west of Swansea. View Full Details>>
Blackpool Sands3 miles (5 km)Visit the popular Blackpool Sands beach and enjoy a circular walk to Strete on this coastal route. Blackpool Sands is located near Dartmouth and contains a beautiful beach, wooded cliffs and turquiose seas. It's a splendid place for a stroll along the beach before picking up the coast path and exploring the surrounding area.
You can start the walk from the Blackpool Sands car park and then follow the South West Coast Path west to the village of Strete. At Strete you can stop for refreshments before following country lanes above the village. These lanes are in an elevated position with splendid views over the surrounding countryside and coast. They will lead you back to the finish point at the Blackpool Sands car park.
To further explore the area you could head to the nearby Dart Estuary where you can visit the 14 century Dartmouth Castle and enjoy wonderful coast and river views. View Full Details>>
Blakeney Point Nature Reserve4 miles (6.5 km)This beautiful National Nature Reserve on the Norfolk coast is a four-mile-long sand and shingle spit with sand dunes, salt marshes, tidal mudflats and farmland. There is a mixed colony of around 500 seals which can be seen on the beach or from boat trips departing from Morston Quay to Blakeney Point.
The visitor centre at Morston Quay is a good place to start your outing. It has a wealth of information about the area and you can catch a boat from the pretty quay to the nature reserve at Blakeney Point. Then you can walk through the reserve where you will find a variety of rare flora and fauna. Look out for interesting plantlife including Sea Lavenders, Yellow-Horned Poppy and the white petals of Sea Campion. There is also an abundance of wildlife with migrant terns, the resident seals, wintering wildfowl and the occasional otter. The walk below takes you along the soft shingle beach and then on to the lifeboat house.
The Peddars Way and Norfolk Coast Path runs past the reserve so you have the option of following this trail to some other lovely locations in the area. On the trail to the west is the Stiffkey Salt Marsh where you will find a vast open expanse of salt marshes which attracts large numbers of birdlife including waders and wintering wildfowl. If you head east along the trail you will pass Blakeney with its pretty key and then on to the Cley Marshes Nature Reserve. This 430 acre reserve contains reed beds, freshwater marsh, pools and wet meadows. View Full Details>>
Bolberry Down1 miles (1.6 km)This easy circular walk explores the National Trust owned Bolberry Down on the Devon coast. It's a splendid place for walk with a fully accessible surfaced path, wildflowers in the summer, pockets of gorse and spectacular coastal views towards Burgh Island and Bigbury Bay.
You can start your walk from the National Trust car park, just to the south of the village of Bolberry. Then pick up the one mile path around the site. If you prefer a longer walk you could start from nearby Salcombe and follow the South West Coast Path to the down. To extend your walk you can follow the coast path west to the headland of Bolt Tail.
Heading in the other direction will take you to towards Salcombe where you can try the Salcombe and Bolt Head Circular Walk. View Full Details>>
Botany Bay Kent2 miles (3 km)Visit this lovely bay on this coastal walk in Broadstairs, Kent. The bay is a popular spot with its lovely beach and notable chalk cliffs.
The walk follows a section of the Thanet Coastal Path from Kinsgate to Palm Bay.
You can park at Kinsgate, Broadstairs at the end of Elmwood Road. Then pick up the coastal path to take you past Joss Bay and Kinsgate Bay to Botany Bay. On the way you will pass the 18th century Kinsgate Castle. The path then continues to Palm Bay on the outskirts of Margate. View Full Details>>
Bournemouth Coast Path37 miles (60 km)This super walk takes you along the beautiful Dorset and Hampshire coastline from Swanage to Lymington. You will visit the beautiful beaches at Sandbanks and Bournemouth while enjoying super cliff top walking at Swanage, Studland and Barton-on-Sea.
Other highlights include the delightful nature reserves at Studland and Hengistbury Head where you will see a variety of coastal birdlife. Also of note is the stunning Christchurch Harbour and the final section along a sea wall through the beautiful Keyhaven Marshes. This fabulous nature reserve runs from Keyhaven to Lymington with a large variety of birdlife and splendid views of the nearby Isle of Wight. View Full Details>>
Branscombe to Beer3 miles (5 km)This is a popular coastal walk between the Devon villages of Branscombe and Beer. It takes you along the South West Coast Path with fantastic cliff tops views. Highlights on the walk include a visit to the National Trust's Manor Mill, the only remaining working mill in Branscombe. You'll also pass the stunning Hooken Cliffs, a Jurassic Coast UNESCO World Heritage Site. A slump in the Chalk cliffs in 1790 separated a 10-acre tract of land, now a wooded and sheltered habitat with chalk pinnacles on the seaward side. It's reached via a steep footpath leading from the clifftop to Branscombe Beach. The thick vegetation in the area is also a haven for wildlife.
The walk starts at the car park in Branscombe, where there is a splendid old thatched forge where you can watch blacksmiths at work. There's also and old bakery which now serves as a tea room. After leaving the village you pass Manor Mill and head towards Branscombe Mouth on the coast. Here you pick up the coast path to take you past Hooken Beach and Hooken Cliffs, before arriving at Beer Head. Here you turn north past Pound's Pool, Arrat's Hil and Big Ledge. The route finishes in the pretty seaside village of Beer, where there are lovely views over Seaton Bay and Lyme Bay with a nice shingle beach and lots of fishing boats.
Apart from a steep section at the start, the walk is fairly flat and takes place on good paths. It's about a 3 mile walk, so 6 miles there and back.
To extend your walking in the area you can continue along the coast path to Seaton where you can pick up the Lyme Regis to Seaton Undercliff Walk. This will take you along the coast from Devon into Dorset.
If you enjoy wildlife you can head to the nearby Seaton Marshes where there is a splendid tramway walk with lots of wildlife to look out for. View Full Details>>
Breakwater Country Park4 miles (7 km)Enjoy over 100 acres of coastal country park on this walking route in Holyhead, Anglesey. There are fabulous views of Holyhead Mountain, the Irish Sea and the Skerries - a group of offshore islands about 7 miles from the coast. The park includes a nature trail, various other footpaths, a visitor centre and good parking facilities.
The Anglesey Coast Path runs through the park so there is scope for continuing your walk along the coast in either direction. Just along the coast you will come to the spectacular South Stack Lighthouse. Here you can descend the 400 steps to the island and enjoy fabulous views on the way. The area also includes the South Stack RSPB nature reserve where you can look out for puffins and porpoises.
If you head in the other direction through Holyhead you will soon come to the lovely Penrhos Beach and Penrhos Coastal Park. The park has lovely coastal views and waymarked nature trails where you can look out for the resident red squirrels. View Full Details>>
Brighton to Eastbourne26 miles (42 km)This coastal walk takes you between these two major Sussex settlements. At just over 26 miles the walk is of marathon length. You'll enjoy some of the best coastal scenery in the country, with pretty beaches and spectacular cliff tops.
Starting on the sea front in Brighton, the route heads east along the Undercliff Walk from Brighton Marina to Saltdean. The path runs for about 3 miles along the sea wall with the white cliffs on one side and the shingle beach on the other.
The next section takes you to Newhaven with a splendid clifftop trail to enjoy. You will pass Peacehaven and the Greenwich Meridian monument which marks the site where the Greenwich meridian crosses the English south coast. At Newhaven you pass the 19th century Newhaven Fort and Newhaven Harbour, where you cross the River Ouse.
You continue to Seaford passing the Martello Tower and the Seaford Head Nature Reserve where there's lots of wildlife to look out for. You then come to Cuckmere River and Cuckmere Haven where you follow a lovely riverside path to the Exceat Bridge. You continue through the Seven Sisters Country Park to the coast, enjoying wonderful views of the Seven Sisters Cliffs.
On the coast you pick up the South Downs Way and head east to Birling Gap where you can visit the National Trust owned Belle Tout lighthouse. It's a good place to stop for refreshments with a nice cafe and great sea views.
Continuing east you visit the highest chalk sea cliff in Britain, at Beachy Head.
From Beachy Head you descend into Eastbourne, passing along the beach before finishing at the pier. View Full Details>>
Brighton to Newhaven9 miles (14.5 km)Follow the Brighton to Newhaven clifftop path on this splendid coastal walk on the south coast. Much of this route follows a traffic free path along National Cycle Network route 2 so you can bring your bike too. Part of the route also passes the popular Undercliff Walk Brighton from the marina at Black Rock to Saltdean. This follows a nice surfaced path along the sea wall with great views of the white cliffs and the sea. Much of the rest of this walk is on an elevated clifftop trail with splendid coastal views. It's about a 9 mile walk but fairly flat throughout.
The walk starts on the front in Brighton and heads east to the Brighton Marina where you pick up the sea wall path. This takes you to Saltdean where you will pass the impressive Saltdean Lido. You continue to the outskirts of Peacehaven where the cycle route turns inland but you can continue along the cliff top if you are on foot. At Peacehaven you will pass the Greenwich Meridian monument marking the site where the Greenwich meridian crosses the English south coast.
The final section takes you past Peacehaven Heights, Harbour Heights and the 19th century Newhaven Fort (video below) before finishing at Newhaven Harbour.
At Newhaven the walk links with two long distance walking trails. You can pick up the Sussex Ouse Valley Way and follow it north along the River Ouse to Piddinghoe if you would like to extend your walk. You could also follow the Vanguard Way further along the coast to Seaford.
You can virtually explore the part of the path around the Peacehaven Greenwich Meridian Monument using the google street view link below. View Full Details>>
Brit Valley Way11 miles (18 km)From the cliffs of the Jurassic Coast at West Bay follow the Brit Valley Way to Chedington, near Beaminster. There is fantastic coastal scenery as well as splendid views of the River Brit to enjoy on this 11 mile walk through Dorset. The walk passes Wynyards Gap, Buckham Down and Beaminster before finishing at Cheddington with stunning views of the West Dorset countryside. View Full Details>>
Brixham to Dartmouth9 miles (15 km)Enjoy a coastal walk between these two popular towns in Devon. The walk follows an undulating section of the South West Coast Path with some splendid cliff top views. It's about a 9.5 mile walk so perfect for a day's hike.
Starting at the marina in Brixham the path heads around Berry Head where you can enjoy a variety of flowering plants and look out for Guillemots on the cliffs.
The path continues to Durl Head and around the beautiful St Mary's Bay to Sharkham Point Nature Reserve. The pretty reserve is fantastic for wildlife with ospreys in the skies above and dolphins in the beautiful turquoise waters below.
You continue south to Southdown Cliff and Crabrock Point before coming to the lovely Scabbacombe Sands. Shortly after you come to another real highlight of the walk at Coleton Fishacre. The National Trust owned site has beautiful gardens full of rare and exotic plants.
After exploring the gardens the route heads to Froward Point where you will find a busy National Coastwatch Institution (NCI) lookout station. Watch keepers here have recorded sightings of seals and other aquatic mammals so keep your eyes peeled for wildlife as you round the point.
The final section of the walk runs to the pretty village of Kingswear on the River Dart. You'll pass the 15th century Kingswear Castle before coming to the village where you can catch the ferry across the river to Dartmouth.
To extend your exercise you can explore Dartmouth and the Dart Estuary on our waterside walk. You could also head north and visit Dittisham using a section of the Dart Valley Trail long distance path. View Full Details>>
Broch of Gurness1 miles (1 km)Visit this Iron Age broch village on Mainland Orkney and learn about its fascinating history stretching back over 2000 years. There are also wonderful coastal views over the Eynhallow Sound to enjoy. View Full Details>>
Burton Bradstock1 miles (2 km)There are a number of lovely coastal walking trails around this pretty National Trust run estate in Dorset. The estate is part of the Jurassic Coast and includes cliff-top trails along Burton cliff and the popular shingle Hive beach. You can use the National Trust car park above Burton Cliff to access the walking trails. Alternatively you could follow the South West Coast Path from nearby Bridport to reach the estate. From the area there are splendid views of Chesil Beach and Golden Cap, the highest point on the south coast. The area is also great for flora and fauna with a variety of plants such as pyramidal orchids, thrift, common mallow and wild clary. Look out for birds such as kestrels and buzzards.
Burton Bradstock is located at the western end of the beautiful Chesil Beach. You could continue your walk by heading east along Chesil Beach to West Bexington Nature Reserve and Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens in the village of Abbotsbury. View Full Details>>
Camber Sands3 miles (5 km)Enjoy a cycle or walk along National Cycle Network Route 2 from Rye to the beautiful Camber Sands. You can pick up the trail in the centre of Rye near to the train station. It's about a 3 mile ride to the beach, passing alongside Camber Road. There are lovely views of Northpoint Water and Rye Bay before passing Rye Golf Club and entering the village of Camber. It's a beautiful and popular beach with the only sand dune system in East Sussex. If you continue your cycle along the coast road you will come to Broomhill Sands and Lydd.
To extend your outing you could pick up the Saxon Shore Way long distance footpath and walk to the Rye Harbour Nature Reserve just south of Rye. The reserve a variety of habitats such as saltmarsh, lagoons, grazing marsh, shingle and reedbeds. You can also visit the ruins of Henry VIII's Camber Castle. The Device Fort was built to protect the Sussex coast against French attack in the 16th century.
The Sussex Border Path also passes through Rye. You can follow the path north from the town centre and enjoy a waterside walk along the River Rother.
You can also follow the England Coast Path east and visit the wonderful Dungeness RSPB Nature Reserve. The large reserve boasts lakes, lagoons and an expansive section of shingle beach with a wide variety of wildlife. View Full Details>>
Cape Cornwall4 miles (7 km)This stunning coastal walk visits the beautiful Cape Cornwall and the Botallack Mines near St Just. There is a National Trust car park right next to the headland from which this walk starts. You pick up the South West Coast Path and head around Cape Cornwall passing the lovely Priest's Cove and the remains of St Helen's Chapel. There are great views towards the Isles of Scilly and Land's End.
You continue along the coast to Kenidjack headland where there is an Iron Age Cliff Castle, pretty wildlfowers and rare breed cattle.
The next section follows footpaths along the coast and inland, exploring the fascinating ruins of the Botallack Mines. The mines were worked for tin and copper for over 500 years and include the Wheal Edward engine house and the Crowns engine houses. It's a great place for taking photos of the old ruined mining buildings with the backdrop of the coast and cliffs. You can also stop in the village of Botallack for refreshments before the return leg. This takes you through the countryside past Kenidjack Farm and Boscean, before picking up the coast path to return you to the car park.
The long distance Zennor Churchway and Tinners Way passes the area so you could pick up this trail to further explore the area. The circular walk offers splendid views of the Cornish countryside and coast around St Ives and St Just. View Full Details>>
Carbis Bay to St Ives2 miles (3.5 km)This is an easy coastal walk from Carbis Bay to St Ives, with wonderful views over St Ives Bay. It's a good surfaced path, running along a section of the long distance South West Coast Path. You'll pass the golden sands of Carbis Bay beach, Porthminster beach and Porthmeor beach. The walk also visits St Ives Head before finishing on Porthminster beach, next to the Tate Gallery St Ives.
The walk starts from Carbis Bay train station so you can get the train back from St Ives. You follow a path above the train line towards Porthminster Point and beach. The walk then descends to the town, heading along the beach to the pier and harbour. You then round St Ives Head before finishing at the Tate. The gallery has rotating modern art exhibitions, focusing on British artists. Nearby, the Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden, in the modernist artist's former studio, displays her bronzes and other works. Boat trips go to the nearby seal colonies on the Carrack Rocks and other locations along the coast.
The beaches are beautiful and there's numerous places to buy refreshments before the return leg of the walk.
To extend the walk you can continue along the coast path on the St Ives to Zennor Walk. Heading east will take you to the lovely Hayle Estuary where there is a RSPB reserve and tremendous views of Porth Kidney Sands.
The long distance St Michaels Way also passes through the area. Pick this up to visit the famous St Michael's Mount. View Full Details>>
Ceredigion Coast Path62 miles (100 km)This walk follows the beautiful coastline of Ceredigion from Cardigan to Borth. The route passes New Quay, Llangrannog, Aberaeron and Aberystwyth. The path includes the dune system at Ynys-las, high cliffs, storm beaches, sandy bays and sea caves. Four sections of the path are designated as Heritage Coast whilst two areas within Cardigan Bay are Marine Special Areas of Conservation. The route also includes the highest numbers of dolphin sightings in the UK - see the video below for more details.
The walk is waymarked with a coast and sea logo. View Full Details>>
Charmouth2 miles (4 km)Go fossil hunting on Charmouth beach and enjoy wonderful views of the Jurassic Coast on this walk in Dorset. The walk starts from the Charmouth Beach car park where you can gain access to the beach and search for fossils. The route then makes use of two long distance trails to take you along the beautiful stretch of coast. You first head east along the Monarch's Way to Stonebarrow Hill before returning along Stonebarrow Lane along the South West Coast Path. You can then finish the walk with a stroll through the pretty village of Charmouth before returning to the car park. The walk includes some wonderful cliff top scenery, beautiful beaches and a range of interesting flora and fauna. There are also nice views of the River Char which you'll cross twice at the start and end of the walk.
Charmouth can also be reached on foot from Lyme Regis by following the South West Coast Path east for about 2 miles. You can also extend your walk by heading east along the coast to the splendid Golden Cap Estate.
The Lyme Regis to Charmouth circular walk visits the fascinating cliffs at Black Ven and the Lyme Regis Golf Club. View Full Details>>
Chesil Beach21 miles (33 km)This walk takes you along Chesil Beach to St Catherine's Chapel in Weymouth, Dorset. The walk starts from the Chesil Beach Centre car park at Portland Harbour. The centre has information about the area and a good cafe.
The pebble beach runs for 18 miles with a series of beautiful lagoons on one side and the sea on the other. The Fleet lagoons are also a nature reserve so look out for a variety of coastal birds including Goldeneye and Manx shearwater.
This walk runs from the car park to Abbotsbury where you will find the delightful Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens and St Catherine's Chapel which is dated from the 14th century. You can return along the beach or pick up the South West Coast Path at Abbotsbury and return on the other side of the lagoons.
You can also continue all the way along the beach to Burton Bradstock. This section of the beach passes West Bexington Nature Reserve and Burton Mere. The reserve consists of reedbed with grazing marsh and mixed coastal scrub. It is home to a variety of flora and fauna including Cetti's warbler, reed warbler, reed bunting, dormouse and water vole. As such it is another highlight of this wonderful stretch of Dorset coast.
At the end of the beach you will find the splendid Burton Bradstock Estate run by the National Trust. View Full Details>>
Chichester Harbour6 miles (10 km)This circular walk take you around the lovely Chidham peninsula. The peninsula extends southwards into Chichester Harbour and lies within an Area of Outstanding Beauty. It's a splendid place for a walk with footpaths running along the coast with fine views over the harbour for the duration of the walk. It's also great for wildlife with several species of wintering wildfowl and waders to look out for on the way.
The walk starts at the village of Nutbourne where there is a train station. You can then pick up the paths heading south along the Thorney Island to Cobnor Point. Here you can enjoy nice views across the Chichester Channel to West Itchenor. The path then turns north along the Bosham Channel to the village of Chidham, with nice views over to Bosham Quay. At Chidham you head west across the countryside to return to Nutbourne.
You can easily extend your walking in this lovely area by heading west to Thorney Island where you can pick up the Sussex Border Path long distance footpath. In nearby Chichester you can pick up the Chichester Canal an enjoy a waterside walk along the towpath. You can also pick up the long distance New Lipchis Way and West Sussex Literary Trail in Chichester.
A few miles south of Chichester you can enjoy more bird watching oppotunities at the lovely RSPB Pagham Harbour. View Full Details>>
Christchurch Harbour6 miles (9 km)This fine circular walk takes you around the beautiful Christchurch Harbour in Dorset. You'll visit the historic priory, climb to Hengistbury Head, stroll along the beautiful beaches at Mudeford and visit the pretty Stanpit Marsh Nature Reserve. The walk also includes two ferry crossings so you can really enjoy the harbour from all angles!
The walk starts from the car park next to Christchurch Priory in the centre of the town. You can enjoy a stroll around the priory grounds where there is a lovely stream leading to the old mill and the harbour. You then follow the path along the River Stour to the Wick Ferry. Here you can catch a little boat across the river for a fee of £1. The ferry runs on most days but if it's closed then you can always continue along the riverside path to Tuckton and cross the river there.
On the other side of the Avon you pick up the Stour Valley Way to take you through fields to Hengistbury Head. Look out for horses in the fields and herons and egrets on the water meadows on this section.
The paths then climb to Hengistbury Head where there are splendid views of the Isle of Wight, Mudeford Spit, Christchurch Harbour and Priory, the Purbeck Hills and Bournemouth Pier and beach. Look out for a variety of wildlife and heather in the late summer.
The path then descends to the lovely Mudeford Spit with its gorgeous beaches, sand dunes and pretty beach huts. Walk along the beach for about 10 minutes and you will reach the ferry on the left hand side. The ferry runs every 15 minutes during British Summer Time, from Easter to late October. It also operates at Weekends and School Hoildays in the Winter months, weather permitting. Click here for more information.
The ferry takes you to Mudeford Quay where there is a nice cafe for refreshments. Walk along the beach for a short while before turning west and following roads back to Stanpit Marsh Nature Reserve. Here you will find lagoons, marshland and reed beds with Curlew, Little Egret, Black-tailed Godwits and Herons to look out for.
The final section takes you past the Two Riversmeet golf course to the town and priory.
To extend your walking in the area you could follow the Avon Valley Path north along the River Avon. View Full Details>>
Church College and Lighthouse walk9 miles (14 km)A walk along the Glamorgan Heritage Coastline. View Full Details>>
Cistercian Way17 miles (28 km)Visit historical religous sites on this fascinating walk through the South Lakeland area of Cumbria
The path starts at the train station at Grange Over Sands and takes you to Cark via Eggerslack Wood and Cartmel with its interesting priory founded in 1190. At Cark you can catch the train over Cartmel sands to Ulverston. It is possible to walk this section over the sands but this is not advised unless you are with an expert guide.
At Ulverston the path heads south to Urswick, leading you around the lovely Urswick Tarn. You continue on through Dalton-in-Furness, passing the delightful Abbotswood Nature Reserve before arriving at Furness Abbey. This ruined former Cistercian monastery dates back to 1123 and is one of the major highlights on the path.
The final section takes you south to the coast where you finish on Roa Island at the southernmost point of the Furness Peninsula. View Full Details>>
Craster2 miles (3.7 km)A circular walk around the Northumberland village of Craster, visiting the Arnold NWT Nature Reserve and the interesting cliff formations at Cullernose Point on the coast. The small fishing village is located in the Northumberland Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It has a pretty harbour and nice coastal footpaths to try. The village is located just to the south of the striking ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle. This circular walk heads in the other direction to visit Cullernose Point where you will find basaltic cliffs which are a significant feature of the local landscape. The walk then passes along a quiet country lane to visit the Arnold Memorial Northumberland Wildlife Trust Reserve where you can look out for various migrant birds and red squirrels.
The long distance St Oswald's Way runs through the village. You can pick this up and head north to visit the castle and the lovely Beadnell Bay. Heading south will take you to Boulmer with its row of cottages and pretty natural haven. Just beyond the village you will come to the picturesque coastal resort of Alnmouth. View Full Details>>
Cromer to Overstrand2 miles (3 km)Follow the cliff top path from Cromer to Overstrand on this walk along the Norfolk coast. The cliffs rise to a height of over 250ft giving great views across both settlements and along the coast. It's a short walk at just over 2 miles, but there is some moderate climbing, so a reasonable level of fitness is required.
The walk starts on the sea front in Cromer next to the pier. The Grade II listed pier is the home of the Cromer Lifeboat Station and the Pavilion Theatre. You pass along the sea front before climbing away from the town towards Cromer Lighthouse. The present lighthouse was built half of a mile from the cliff edge (although it is now much closer) and came into operation in 1833. It is constructed of masonry and the tower is octagonal in shape and is 59 feet (18 m) tall.
The path continues along the Royal Cromer Golf Club, before descending to the village of Overstrand. Here you can enjoy refreshments at the cliff top cafe before the return leg.
The walk forms the first part of the long distance Paston Way so you can extend your exercise by continuing along the path to Bacton and North Walsham.
You could also head in the other direction on the Cromer to Sheringham Walk. Here you can you can enjoy walks in the lovely Sheringham Park. The National Trust owned estate includes miles of peaceful woodland trails and beautiful landscaped gardens full of rhododendrons and azaleas. View Full Details>>
Cromer to Sheringham9 miles (15 km)Enjoy nice beaches and great coastal views from Beeston Cliffs on this circular walk along the Norfolk coast. After visiting Sheringham the route returns via the Norfolk Coast Path and Beacon Hill, Norfolk's highest point.
The walk starts next to the pier in Cromer and heads west along the English Coast Path to Muckle Hill. You continue along the beach to West Runton before coming to Sheringham. Here you can enjoy refreshments before retracing your steps for about half a mile. Then you can pick up a section of the Norfolk Coast Path which climbs south away from the coast. This will take you to the 103 metres (338 ft) high Beacon Hill which is run by the National Trust. There's some nice woodland trails here with great views of the sea.
After exploring Beacon Hill the walk descends back into Cromer. You can extend your exercise by heading east along the coast on the Cromer to Overstrand Walk. It's a great cliff top path with wonderful sea views and a visit to Cromer Lighthouse.
If you continue west along the coast path it will take you to the lovely Cley Marshes Nature Reserve where there are a number of pools and lagoons with lots of wildlife to look out for.
Also in Sheringham is the delightful Sheringham Park. View Full Details>>
Culver Down2 miles (4 km)Explore the beautiful Culver Down before visiting Bembridge Hill Fort on this circular walk on the Isle of Wight coast. There are fabulous views over Sandown Bay, Shanklin Bay and the Solent to enjoy on the walk. The downs are also covered in pretty wildflowers such as cowslip, rock rose, Bee orchid and birdsfoot trefoil. These attract many butterflies such as the chalkhill blue.
The walk starts at the Culver Cliff car park and heads to Culver Battery and Whitecliff Ledge where there are great views over Whitecliff Bay, Horseshoe Bay and Bembridge. You continue along the coast path before climbing to the hill fort. Here you can explore the remains of 19th-century and First World War fortifications with gun emplacements. From the elevated position there are tremendous views over the downs to the sea.
From the fort you descend across Bembridge Down back to the car park. You'll pass the Yarborough Monument, a memorial to Lord Yarborough, the first Commodore of the Royal Yacht Squadron on the way.
You can extend your walk by continuing along the Isle of Wight Coast Path in either direction. The Bembridge Trail and the Yar River Trail also pass through the area just north of the hill fort. If you are on a bike then National Cycle Route 67 also runs close to the fort. You can follow the route from Bembridge to Culver Down Road and turn south to reach the downs and the fort. View Full Details>>
Cumbria Coastal Way182 miles (293 km)Explore the wonderful coastline of Cumbria on this splendid long distance path. The walk begins at Silverdale and runs through a series of fascinating Cumbrian coastal towns and villages, before finishing near Gretna on the border with Scotland. Spectacular cliff tops, peaceful estuaries, beaches, mountains, rivers and canals are all features on this popular route.
  • Silverdale, Lancashire
  • Arnside
  • Grange-over-Sands
  • Greenodd
  • Ulverston
  • Barrow-in-Furness
  • Askam-in-Furness
  • Kirkby-in-Furness
  • Broughton-in-Furness
  • Millom and the lovely Hodbarrow Lakes Nature Reserve
  • Ravenglass
  • Seascale
  • St. Bees
  • St. Bees Head
  • Whitehaven
  • Workington
  • Maryport
  • Allonby
  • Silloth
  • Abbeytown
  • Burgh by Sands
  • Carlisle
Walk highlights include Morecambe Bay, the Solway Coast, the Lake District mountains, the red sandstone cliffs of St. Bees Head, a waterside section along the River Eden into Carlisle and views of Hadrian's Wall.
The video below shows the lovely views from Grange-Over-Sands and Arnside. From here you can see the Lake District Mountains and Morecambe Bay in the distance.
The walk has been designed for all abilities with very few strenuous climbs. It is also very accessible with train stations and bus routes dotted along the route. The walk is well waymarked with a dark green and yellow disc. View Full Details>>
Dancing Ledge2 miles (4 km)Visit this lovely area of the Dorset coast on this walk to Dancing Ledge. The walk starts at the car park in the pretty village of Langton Matravers and descends to the coast through some attractive countryside.  Dancing Ledge is so called because when the waves wash over the surface of the rocks it appears as the the ledge is 'dancing'. It's a very pretty spot with lovely views down the coast and the option of continuing to Seacombe Cliff and the nearby village of Worth Matravers.
To extend your walk you could pick up the South West Coast Path and head east towards Swanage and Durlston Country Park. View Full Details>>
Dane's Dyke1 miles (2 km)These delightful little woods near Flamborough are perfect for a peaceful afternoon's stroll. The woods are located right next to the coast, just east of Sewerby Hall. In February you will find snowdrops covering the area, while in spring carpets of bluebells appear.
The area is also a nature reserve so look out for wildlife including deer, squirrels and a variety of woodland birds.
You can start your walk from the car park just off the Flamborough Road. From here you can pick up the nice woodland footpaths which will take you around the site, including a visit to the lovely beach. There's nice coastal views towards Bridlington from the cliff tops.
The woods are located very close to Flamborough Head which is a great place for extending your walk. The splendid area includes towering white chalk cliffs, coves, caves, pretty bays and the oldest surviving lighthouse in Britain.
Just up from Flamborough Head is the splendid Bempton Cliffs. The area is a RSPB Nature Reserve and considered the best place in England to watch seabirds. View Full Details>>
Dartmouth and the Dart Estuary6 miles (9 km)Enjoy one of the finest areas of Devon on this waterside walk in Dartmouth. You'll visit the fascinating Dartmouth Castle before a coastal stretch to Warren Point and Little Dartmouth.
The walk starts in the town centre and follows the South West Coast Path south along the river to Warfleet Creek where there is a stony beach and several small rockpools at low tide. Soon after you reach the 14th century Dartmouth Castle which has guarded the entrance to the Dart Estuary for centuries. For a fee you can explore the castle and grounds where there are nice woodland trails and fabulous views over the estuary. There's also the option to catch a ferry across the water where you can look out for the wide variety of water loving birds which visit the area.
After leaving the castle you continue to Blackstone Point where you follow the coast path to Warren Point. You then head inland to Little Dartmouth before picking up the riverside path back into Dartmouth.
If you would like to extend your walking in the Dartmouth area then you can catch the ferry to Kingswear and visit the splendid Coleton Fishacre Gardens. Continuing west along the coast path will take you to the beautiful beach at Blackpool Sands.
You could also pick up the Dart Valley Trail and head north along the river to the little village of Dittisham. Here you can catch the Greenway Ferry and visit the wonderful Greenway Estate where Agatha Christie took her holidays. View Full Details>>
Dawlish Sea Wall2 miles (3 km)Follow the sea wall from Dawlish to Dawlish Warren on this lovely coastal walk. The sea wall runs right alongside the train line with the beach on the other side. It's about a 2 mile walk on a very flat section of the South West Coast Path, so ideal for a nice easy afternoon stroll.
The walk starts on the front in the seaside resort of Dawlish. The attractive town has a nice beach and a pretty park through which Dawlish Water flows. It's also known for its black swans, introduced from Western Australia, which live with other exotic waterfowl in a small urban sanctuary on Dawlish Water. The town is easily accessible with a train station on the Exeter to Plymouth line.
The walk heads north east along the sea wall with views of the red sandstone cliffs which characterise the area.
At the end of the walk you will find the Dawlish Warren Nature Reserve which is an excellent place for birdwatching on the Exe Estuary. Here you can look out for little egrets, herons, kingfishers, reed buntings and peregrines.
The resort also has a number of nice cafes and restaurants for refreshments at the end of your walk.
There's great scope for extending your walk if you have time. You could pick up the Teignmouth and Dawlish Way and head through the countryside to the nearby town.
At Dawlish Warren you can pick up the Exe Valley Way and head north into Exter along the Exeter Canal and the River Exe. View Full Details>>
Dinas Island2 miles (4 km)Enjoy stunning coastal views on this circular walk on the Pembrokeshire Coast. Dinas Island is actually a peninsula with a wonderful 466ft (142m) viewpoint at the high point known as Pen-y-fan.  It's a steep climb but you are rewarded with wonderful views of Cardigan Bay, Fishguard Bay, Snowdonia and Llyn. The headland itself is very attractive, covered with a variety of plants and flowers including gorse, bracken, hawthorn, blackthorn, heather, foxglove and orchids. There's also good birdwatching opportunities as you may see choughs, peregrine falcons and various other sea birds.
The walk starts at the car park at Cwm Yr Eglwys at the south eastern end of Dinas Island. You then follow the Pembrokeshire Coast Path to Pen-y-fan passing the Old Sailor Pub on the way. You can also reach Dinas Island by following the Pembrokeshire Coast Path from nearby Fishguard. View Full Details>>
Dodman Point2 miles (3.5 km)This circular walk explores this wonderful headland on the Cornish coast. The area is located near the village of Gorran Haven and is the highest headland on the south coast of Cornwall. There's splendid coastal views, pretty beaches, lovely countryside and lots of wildlife to look out for.
The walk starts from the Penare car park, about half a mile south of Dodman Point. From here you head west towards Hemmick Beach with wonderful views across Veryan Bay to the west. You then pick up the South West Coast Path to take you up to Dodman Point. Here you will find a large granite cross, placed here in 1896 as a navigational aid to seafarers. From the elevated headland there are fabulous views towards the Roseland Peninsula. Look out for wildlife including Dartmoor ponies, peregrine falcon, stonechat and gannet.
The walk can also be started from the nearby village of Gorran Haven if you prefer. It's about a 2 mile walk from the village along the coast path to the point. It will take you past the lovely Vault Beach and the delightful Gorran Harbour.
If you would like to extend your walk you can follow the coast path north to Mevagissey and visit the Lost Gardens of Heligan. The gardens are a real highlight of the area and include Victorian Productive Gardens, romantic Pleasure Grounds and a lush sub-tropical Jungle. View Full Details>>
Donna Nook Nature Reserve10 miles (16 km)This coastal nature reserve in Lincolnshire consists of dunes, slacks and inter-tidal areas. It's a great place for birdwatching with 47 species of birds to look out for. In November and December you can see the grey seal colony give birth to their pups near the sand dunes. It's quite a spectacle and attracts thousands of visitors each year.
This circular walk starts at the car park and takes you along the coast and then into the surrounding countryide on footpaths and country lanes. You'll visit the nearby villages of Grainthorpe and North Somercotes before returning to the reserve car park. View Full Details>>
Dover to Deal10 miles (15.5 km)This coastal walk takes you from the famous port of Dover to the attractive town of Deal. It's about a 9.5 mile walk with the option of returning to Dover on the train. There's great cliff top views, a series of historic castles and a long stretch of lovely countryside with wildflowers and butterflies.
The walk starts by the marina in Dover and heads towards the wonderful Dover Castle. It's the largest castle in England and includes the fascinating Secret Wartime Tunnels and interesting exhibitions.
You climb past the castle and through the National Trust owned White Cliffs Country Park. There's a nice visitor centre here with information about the different trails you can try in the park. From the viewpoints there are great views of the famous Dover White Cliffs and the Dover Docks.
After passing through the park you continue east to the Victorian South Foreland Lighthouse. You can climb to the top of the structure and enjoy great views over to France. There's also a nice cliff top cafe which is a great place to stop for refreshments.
The route continues to St Margaret's Bay passing the delightful Pines Garden. The Gardens include a waterfall, lake, a grass labyrinth and an organic kitchen garden with around 40 different species of fruit and vegetables. The site also includes the St. Margaret's Museum with interesting local history displays such as St Margaret's during WW2, and one-time resident Noel Coward.
The route then descends to Kingsdown, passing along the beach and the golf course. Shortly after you come to the very fine Walmer Castle. It was built during the reign of King Henry VIII and includes lovely 8 acre gardens and fascinating exhibitions.
The final section takes you into Deal, where you can enjoy a stroll along the pier. From here it is a short walk to the train station where you can return to Dover.
There's great scope for extending your walk by following the White Cliffs Country Trails from Deal to Sandwich. Here there are nice views of the River Stour and lots of nice pubs to choose from.
To head along the coast in the other direction try our Dover to Folkestone Walk which takes you between these two major ports. View Full Details>>
Dover to Folkestone7 miles (11 km)This is a popular walk between these two major towns on the Kent coast. It's about a 7 mile walk, with some moderate climbs so a reasonable level of fitness is required. The walk takes you along cliff tops with great views and visits to the two country parks located on the route. You can return easily by catching the train back to Dover from Folkestone West railway station.
The walk starts at the docks in Dover and follows the North Downs Way to the ruins of the medieval Knights Templar Church, on Bredenstone hill. You continue past Aycliff to Samphire Hoe Country Park. The park was created by using chalk marl from the Channel Tunnel excavations and is found at the bottom of a section of the White Cliffs of Dover. There are great views over the Strait of Dover and a Nature Reserve with a large variety of wildlife to look out for.
You continue west, passing the  World War II coastal defence battery of Lydden Spout before coming to East Cliff and Warren Country Park. This route crosses the train line here to follow the coastal path but you could also pick up the woodland trails through the park. The park is formed of the East Cliffs of Folkestone, the sandy beaches of East Wear Bay and the land-slipped nature reserve land between the cliffs and the sea. There are more great views, interesting flora and fauna and three old Martello Towers to see. These were built on the cliffs in the early 19th century to protect against the French invasion of Napoleon.
The path continues along the coast, passing the Folkestone Roman Villa. The villa was built during the Roman Occupation of Britain, and is located in East Wear Bay. It's situated on a cliff top overlooking the English Channel, with views of the French coast at Boulogne on a clear day.
The final section descends to Folkestone, finishing at the harbour. Just down the coast you can visit Lower Leas Coastal Park if you wish to extend the walk. It's a lovely park with pretty gardens and a free adventure play area.
To travel along the coast in the other direction try the Dover to Deal Walk. View Full Details>>
Druridge Bay Country Park3 miles (5 km)This beautiful country park on the Northumberland coast consists of three miles of beach and sand dunes, a large freshwater lake, peaceful woodland and meadows. The coastline is simply stunning with a lovely cycling and walking path running alongside the beach. You could continue your outing by following the coast north towards Amble with views of Coquet Island, or head south to Newbiggin-By-The-Sea. There are several nature reserves in the area so there are plenty of opportunities for bird watching too. View Full Details>>
Dungeness7 miles (11.5 km)Explore this wonderful coastal nature reserve on this circular walk in Kent. The reserve contains a number of lakes and lagoons with several miles of good footpaths to follow around the expansive site. There's also coastal paths with great views of the sea and the long stretch of shingle beach. The reserve is superb for wildlife watching with lots of birds to look out for. Keep your eyes peeled for lapwings, smew, bittern and little ringed plover from one of the many bird hides. There's also over 600 different types of plant species. The RSPB site has good facilities with a car park and visitor centre.
You can start the walk from the car park off Dungeness Road, about a mile east of Lydd. From here you can pick up the trails taking you around the lakes to the coast. The path then heads south along Broomhill Sands to the village of Lydd-on-Sea, the lifeboat station and the lighthouse. The route then follows path across Denge Beach back to the car park. On this section you pass the nuclear power stations which warm the water in the area attracting large numbers of birds.
Also of intrest is the The Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway. The narrow gauge railway was built in 1927 and is a fun way to see the area.
To extend your walk you can pick up the England Coast Path and follow it west to Camber Sands and Rye Harbour. Here you will find saltmarsh, lagoons, grazing marsh, shingle and reedbeds with a huge variety of flora and fauna.
You can also head to the nearby New Romney and explore Romney Marsh. View Full Details>>
Dunstanburgh Castle7 miles (11 km)This walk takes you along a beautiful stretch of the Northumberland coastline from Craster to Dunstanburgh Castle and then on to Embleton Bay and the Newton Pool Nature Reserve.
Dunstanburgh Castle was built in the 14th century, being one of the largest and grandest fortifications in Northern England at the time. The dramatic ruins are now a popular tourist attraction, standing on a remote headland with fine views of Embleton Bay and Craster.
This walk starts at the small fishing village of Craster and follows the coastal path past the castle to Embleton Bay where you will find a lovely beach and sand dunes. You continue to the Newton Pool Nature Reserve where you can use the bird hides to look out for Herons and Barn Owls.
The castle is located about 5 miles north east of Alnwick. The St Oswald's Way walking route runs past the castle so you could extend your walk along this footpath.
Heading north with take you to Beadnell where you will find the lovely Beadnell Bay with its 2 mile long sandy beach.
You can also try our Craster Circular Walk and visit the Arnold NWT Nature Reserve and the interesting cliff formations at Cullernose Point. View Full Details>>
Duntulm Castle1 miles (1 km)Visit the fascinating ruins of this 14th century coastal castle and enjoy wonderful views of Tulm Bay on this walk in Trotternish. There is a parking area just off the A855 with a footpath leading to the castle ruins. The castle is surrounded by dramatic cliffs with wonderful views over Tulm Bay and Duntulm Bay. The ruins and surrounding scenery are quite striking and very photogenic. View Full Details>>
Durham Coastal Footpath11 miles (18 km)This walk follows a beautiful section of the Durham coast from Seaham to Crimdon Park, just outside Hartlepool.
The path starts by Seaham harbour and heads south to Easington Colliery, passing Shippersea Bay and the lovely Hawthorn Dene Nature Reserve on the way. This delightful reserve is run by the Durham Wildlife Trust and consists of woodland and limestone hay meadows.
The path continues south, passing Horden and Peterlee with more stunning cliff top views. Around Peterlee you will pass the wonderful Castle Eden Dene National Nature Reserve. It is the largest area of semi-natural woodland in north-east England and a major highlight on the route. The last section of the walk then takes you to the finish point at Crimdon Park just north of Hartlepool. View Full Details>>
Erme Estuary5 miles (8.5 km)This circular walk explores the beautiful estuary of the River Erme as it meets the English Channel in South Devon. The estuary is now designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, with pretty beaches, coastal views and lots of wildlife. Look out for Egrets, curlew, oystercatchers and shelduck on your walk.
The walk starts and finishes from the little village of Kingston, just to the east of the estuary. You then follow footpaths west to Furzedown Wood where woodland trails lead you to the coast. At this point you have the option of crossing the estuary at low tide and heading west towards Newton Ferrers, although you may well get your feet wet! This route heads south along the coast path, passing old lime kilns and Wonwell Beach on your way to Beacon Point. You continue east along the coast to Hoist Point and Westcombe Beach where you turn inland. The route then follows Wiscombe Lane back into Kingston.
To extend your walk you could continue east along the South West Coast Path and head to Burgh Island at Bigbury-on-Sea. You can walk to the island at low tide or catch the sea tractor which is run by the island's hotel. Around here you can also pick up the Avon Estuary Walk which is a similar walk to this one.
If you would like to explore the course of the river, then head north towards Ermington to pick up the Erme Plym Trail. View Full Details>>
Farne Islands1 miles (1 km)The Farne Islands are located just 1.5 miles from the Northumberland coast at Bamburgh. You can catch a boat from Seahouses harbour to Inner Farne, the largest of the islands. Here you can see colonies of grey seals and up to 37000 pairs of puffins. The islands attract many other seabirds including Guillemots, Razorbills, Sandwich Terns, Common Terns, Roseate Terns, Arctic Terns, Shags, Cormorants and Eider Ducks. There is a lovely walkway around Inner Farne taking you past the interesting buildings which date from the monastic period. These include the remains of the old Guest House, the Chapel of St Cuthbert with fine stained-glass windows and the Pele Tower. The islands are run by the National Trust so entry is free for members.
To continue your walking in the area try the Seahouses to Bamburgh walk and visit the fascinating coastal castle. The long distance St Oswald's Way also passes the islands and is a great way to explore the Northumberland Coast AONB. View Full Details>>
Fife Coastal Path115 miles (185 km)This walk runs along the attractive Fife coast from Kincardine Bridge to Newburgh. View Full Details>>
Filey Brigg Country Park2 miles (3 km)This super country park is located on the coast at Filey in North Yorkshire. It is also known as North Cliff Country Park. The park has super views over Filey Bay and the town below. The walk also takes you along Filey Brigg - a long narrow peninsula with steep cliffs and lovely coastal views.
The Cleveland Way and the Centenary Way walking routes run past the park so there is scope for continuing your walk along the coast to the nearby town of Scarborough. The Scarborough to Filey Walk gives more details on this stretch of coast which is one of the finest in the country. View Full Details>>
Flamborough Head7 miles (12 km)Enjoy some spectacular coastal views on this walk along Flamborough Head in the North York Moors. On the walk you'll pass towering white chalk cliffs, coves, caves, pretty bays and the oldest surviving lighthouse in Britain. The area is also designated as a nature reserve so look out for large seabird colonies including auks, gannets and gulls. In summer you may also see fulmars, herring gulls, kittiwakes, guillemots, razorbills and puffins. In the Holmes area there are also interesting plants and flowers which attract a variety of butterflies.
This walk starts at the village of Flamborough and picks up a footpath south to the coast. You then head along the coast passing Cross Bow Hill and a radio station beacon. You continue past Selwicks Bay to Thornwick Bay before returning to Flamborough via another countryside footpath.
The East Riding Heritage Way passes through Flamborough Head so you could continue along this path to the nearby Bempton Cliffs where you can see more seabirds.
Also nearby is the pretty Dane's Dyke. These pretty woods have peaceful trails with lots of flora and fauna to look out for. View Full Details>>
Foreland Point5 miles (8 km)This walk visits Foreland Point Lighthouse before exploring Countisbury Common on the Exmoor coast. It's an exhilirating walk with wonderful coastal scenery, pretty heather, woodland trails and challenging climbs.
The walk starts from the Barna Barrow car park just off the A39 to the east of the village of Countisbury. You then head west to Butter Hill which stands at a height of 302 metres (990ft). The route then descends along the South West Coast Path and other public footpaths to Foreland Lighthouse at the most northerly point along the Devon and Exmoor coast. From here there are great views across the Bristol Channel to the Welsh coast. The route then heads east along the coast path towards Desolation Point, passing through Chubhill Wood on the way. The route then turns west, passing Kipscombe Hill and Countisbury Common before returning to the car park.
To extend your walk you can head south and visit the lovely Watersmeet. Here you will find 2000 acres of river gorge and woodland with miles of walking trails to try. View Full Details>>
Fowey Hall Walk4 miles (6 km)This popular circular walk in Fowey involves two ferry crossings and lovely waterside sections along Pont Pill and Fowey Quay. Along the way you'll enjoy wonderful views over Fowey Harbour, the River Fowey and the south coast. There's also pretty little quays, Cornish villages and splendid pubs for refreshments.
The walk starts in Fowey, at the Fowey to Bodinnick Ferry. After catching the ferry to Bodinnick you pick up the footpath and head south to the 'Q' memorial. The route then heads east along the green waters of the tidal river of Pont Pill to the pretty hamlet of Pont. Here you cross a footbridge to the southern side of Pont Pill and head west to Polruan. At Polruan you catch the ferry back to Fowey and finish the walk with a stroll along the quay.
To extend your walking in the area you could follow the coast path east and try the popular Looe to Polperro Walk. The walk takes in Talland Bay, the Looe Estuary and Hannafore with great views to Looe Island. View Full Details>>
Gara Point Yealm Estuary3 miles (5.5 km)This circular coastal walk near Newton Ferrers visits Gara Point with wonderful views over the Yealm Estuary.
The walk starts from the National Trust car park at Warren and follows the South West Coast Path to Gara Point, passing Blackstone Point SSI on the way. It's a lovely spot with wildflowers, green fields, gorse and wonderful views to Wembury Bay, Plymouth Sound and the Mewstone. From Gara Point you head towards Cellar Beach which you can visit by climbing down some steps. You then start a short woodland section through the Brakehill Plantation, a 19th-century woodland of ash, chestnut, sycamore, beech and oaks. You continue through more woodland towards Noss Mayo with great views over the Yealm River and Newton Ferrers. The final section heads inland through the countryside on a mixture of country lanes and footpaths, returning you to the car park.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby Wembury Point. View Full Details>>
Garn Fawr1 miles (2 km)This short circular walk climbs the spectacular Garn Fawr viewpoint on the Pembrokeshire Coast. There is a parking area just opposite a grassy path which leads to the high point and an OS trig point.  A little scramble is required to climb to the 213m (699 feet) summit where there are wonderful views over the surrounding coast and countryside. The Pen Caer peninsula and the lighthouse at Strumble Head are clearly visible. The area is also the site of a very fine 2,500 year old Iron Age Fort. It is still possible to make out much of the layout of its ramparts.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head north along the Pembrokeshire Coast Path to the nearby Strumble Head where you can look out for porpoises and seals. View Full Details>>
Giant's Causeway2 miles (3.5 km)This spectacular coastal causeway in Northern Ireland has a unique polygonal landscape feature. In a 2005 poll of Radio Times readers, the Giant's Causeway was named as the fourth greatest natural wonder in the United Kingdom. The geological features include the 'Organ' where huge columns of basalt resemble Organ Pipes. You'll also pass the the Giant's Boot and a natural stone throne known as the Wishing Chair. You can also climb the 167 Shepherd's Steps for wonderful views across the coast. The is also a nature reserve so look out for a variety of flora and fauna including many species of plants, fungi, lichen, birds, spiders, beetles and butterflies.
The walk starts at the excellent National Trust Visitor Centre where you will find a wealth of information and a good sized car park. You then follow footpaths past the headland of Great Stookan, Port Granny, Grand Causeway and Port Noffer. The walk returns via the Organ and the Giant's Chair. The walk can be extended by continuing along the North Antrim Coast Path towards Dunseverick.
If you would like to visit the causeway by bike then National Cycle Network Route 93 runs to the site along the fantastic Causeway Coast Cycle Route. You can pick up the trail from Castle Rock, Portrush or Bushmills. View Full Details>>
Gibraltar Point4 miles (6 km)Enjoy a walk around this beautiful coastal nature reserve near Skegness. It's a lovely place for a peaceful stroll with numerous footpaths to follow through the sand, saltmarsh and dunes with several artificial lakes and bird hides along the way. There are lovely views of the Wash and the Lincolnshire coast and countryside. It's fantastic for bird watching with a variety of coastal birds to look out for. These include brent geese, shorelark,  redwing and fieldfare. There's also an excellent visitor centre with a Wild Coast Exhibition that includes 3d models of sand dunes and salt marshes.
The reserve is located just a few miles south of Skegness so you could easily walk there from the town. Parking is available at the reserve too though. View Full Details>>
Godrevy Head5 miles (8.5 km)Explore Godrevy Head and enjoy wonderful views of St Ives Bay and the Cornish coast on this splendid coastal walk. The area is managed by the National Trust so there's good footpaths and facilities along this stretch of coast. Along the way there's pretty beaches, attractive countryside, heathland and a wide variety of wildlife to look out for. Keep your eyes peeled for dolphins, seals and basking sharks in the water below.
You can start the walk from the Godrevy National Trust car park off Churchtown Road, near Gwithian Bridge. You then head north along the coast path towards Godrevy Point where there are splendid views towards Godrevy Island and its lighthouse. The path continues along the headland to Navrax Point, passing Kynance Cove on the way. The route then turns south passing the lovely heathland of The Knavocks where you should look out for ponies grazing. The final section passes Castle Giver Cove and Higher Pencobben before finishing at Hell's Mouth where you can watch hundreds of seabirds around the cliffs. There is a cafe at Hell's Mouth where you can rest and take on some refreshment before heading back to the car park on the same path.
You can extend your walk by continuing along the coast path to Portreath. The path passes Reskajeage Downs, Carvannel Downs and Tehidy Country Park. The park is located just a few miles east of Hell's Mouth and contains 250 acres of woodland and lakes. There's nice cycling and walking trails and lots more wildlife to look out for around the lake. View Full Details>>
Gower Way35 miles (56 km)This walk takes you through the stunning Gower AONB from Penlle'r Castell in the north, to Rhossili on the Gower Peninsula, in the south. The route was inaugurated by the Prince of Wales in 1998 and takes you past a variety of impressive historical sites, including ancient cairns, standing stones and Norman chapels.
The first section runs from Penlle'r Castell to Gowerton, passing theLliw Reservoirs, before crossing the River Lliw a Gorseinon.
The second section runs from Gowerton to Penmaen where you can enjoy splendid coastal views of Oxwich Bay.
The final section runs from Penmaen to Rhossili, with a climb to the sandstone ridge of Cefn Bryn where there are more fabulous views of the Gower Peninsula.
At Rhossili you can enjoy wonderful views over Rhossili Bay and Worm's Head. This unusual promontory, is shaped like a giant sea-serpent and marks the most westerly tip of Gower. It is possible to walk to Worm's Head  but only when the tide is out so check tide times before if you intend to extend your walk here.
The walk is waymarked with a black, green and yellow disc. View Full Details>>
Grange-over-Sands and Cartmel Circular14 miles (23 km)This circular walk makes use of the Cumbria Coastal Way and Cistercian Way to take you on a tour of the area surrounding this lovely coastal town. Grange-over-Sands is located on Morecambe Bay on the edge of the Lake District National Park. The walk starts on the wonderful long promenade where there are super views over the sands towards Arnside, Silverdale and the Lakeland fells. You then pass through the pretty ornamental gardens and climb towards Cartmel, passing Eggerslack Wood and Hampsfell Hill as you go. From the high points on Hampsfell there are splendid views over the coastline and countryside. Cartmel is a delightful little village with pretty cottages and the River Eea running through it. It is also home to the fascinating 12th century Cartmel Priory.
From Cartmel you continue through the countryside to Cark before returning to the coastline at Lenibrick Point. You then return to Grange-over-Sands along the coast and then through the countryside, passing Allithwaite on the way. View Full Details>>
Haematite Trail19 miles (31 km)This is a circular walk around the town of Barrow-in-Furness in Cumbria. The walk explores the remains of the iron mining industry in the area. You will pass Newton, Little Urswick, Lindal, Askam in Furness and Marton. The walk follows the coastal path along Duddon Sands with fabulous views of the Cumbrian hills and mountains. The coastal section also passes the Sandale Haws Nature Reserve which is well worth exploring if you have time. Also of interest is the 12th century ruined monastery of Furness Abbey located on the outskirts of Barrow-in-Furness. View Full Details>>
Hartland Point2 miles (2.5 km)Visit Hartland Point on this circular walk on the beautiful Hartland Peninsula in Devon. It's a great place to get some sea air and admire the fantastic coastal views. The dramatic location is where the Bristol Channel meets the Atlantic Ocean. There's rocky cliffs and views of the wrecked ship MS  Johanna which ran aground on the rocks below. It's also great for wildlife watching with skuas, terns and shearwaters to look out for.
There's a car park close to the point near Blagdon Farm, West Titchberry. From here you can pick up the South West Coast Path to take you along Barley Bay towards the 19th century Hartland Point Lighthouse. The route then continues along Blagdon Cliff and Upright Cliff, before turning east and returning to the car park through the countryside.
To extend your walk you can follow the South West Coast Path south and visit the delightful Hartland Quay. View Full Details>>
Hartland Quay4 miles (6 km)This circular walk around the Hartland Peninsula takes in some beautiful coastal views, interesting rock formations, plunging waterfalls and the little village of Stoke. There are great views towards Lundy Island and a variety of sea birds to look out for along the way.
The walk starts at the Hartland Quay car park and heads south along the coast passing Screda Point, St Catherine's Point, St Catherine's Tor and Speke's Mill. There are pretty streams, waterfalls and in the summer months various pretty plants suchs as yellow flag irises, foxgloves and campion.
At Speke's Mill Mouth you head inland through the countryside to Lymebridge before turning north towards the village of Stoke. The village has a 14th century church and tea rooms where you can stop for refreshments.
From Stoke it is a short walk back to the Hartland Quay car park although you could take a short detour to visit the fascinating Hartland Abbey. The 12th century abbey has lovely grounds and gardens with the Abbey River flowing through.
To extend your walk you can follow the South West Coast Path north to Hartland Point where you will pass the 19th century lighthouse. There's also dramatic cliffs and views of the shipwreck Johanna at this spot where the Bristol Channel meets the Atlantic Ocean. View Full Details>>
Hayle Estuary2 miles (3 km)Enjoy a walk or cycle around the beautiful Hayle Estuary RSPB reserve in Cornwall. A section of the South West Coast Path runs along the estuary from Hayle Harbour to Lelant. There's tremendous views of Porth Kidney Sands and a visit to Griggs Quay to enjoy.
The route starts in Hayle near to the train station and harbour. You soon come to the delightful Carnsew Pool where there is a circular walking trail around the water. You continue towards Lelant Water and RSPB Ryan's Field. Here you will find a lagoon with little islands where you can look out for a variety of birds.
The next section takes you past Griggs Quay to Lelant where you have the option of continuing to Porth Kidney Sands.
The reserve is wonderful for bird watching with 18,000 birds including many wading birds, gulls and terns. Look out for teal, curlew, little egret and oystercatcher as you make your way around this stunning area. In Hayle you can also visit the Copperhouse Pool next to the harbour. There's a path along the Copperhouse Creek where you can get very close to the birds.
National Cycle Network Route 3 passes the site so you can extend your outing by heading south to St Erth along the River Hayle. Walkers can continue west along the South West Coast Path to Carbis Bay and St Ives. View Full Details>>
Heddon Valley2 miles (3.5 km)Enjoy an easy waterside walk through the beautiful Heddon Valley in Exmoor. The riverside footpath leads through woodland before the beautiful coast and cliffs of Heddon's mouth come in to view.
The walk starts at the National Trust car park and heads north through Heddon's Mouth Wood to the coast through Heddon's mouth with its imposing cliffs. The point where the valley opens out to reveal the sea and cliffs is really lovely. The path then leads down to the pebble beach where you will find a 19th century lime kiln.
The area is great for wildlife spotting. Look out for otters and various birds suchs as dippers, grey wagtails and herons. In summer the area is covered with yellow gorse flowers and heather.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could head east towards Trentishoe Down for views of the beautiful Elwill Bay. You could also climb the Hangman Hills for tremendous views over Combe Martin. If you head east you will find the lovely wooded cove at Woody Bay with a secluded pebble beach. View Full Details>>
Highcliffe Castle and Coast2 miles (3 km)Explore the grounds of this 19th century Gothic Revival house and enjoy a walk along the splendid Highcliffe coast and cliffs. The castle is surrounded by attractive wide lawns and beautiful formal gardens. There are also nice woodland trails along the cliff top and a zig-zag path down to the beach. There's great views from the high points along the south coast towards Christchurch Bay and the Isle of Wight.
The walk also visits the Steamer Point Nature Reserve just to the west of the castle. The reserve has some nice woodland trails and a variety of flora and fauna to look out for.
Just to the east of the castle you'll find Chewton Bunny Nature Reserve. The wooded Chine has a trail leading to a pretty waterfall.

To extend your walking in the area you can pick up the Bournemouth Coast Path. If you head west you'll come to Christchurch and the delightful Stanpit Marsh Nature Reserve. Also nearby is Hengistbury Head and Mudeford with its lovely beaches and fabulous coastal views.
Heading east along the coast path takes you to Barton-on-Sea and Milford-on-Sea where you can explore the wonderful Keyhaven Marshes. View Full Details>>
Holkham National Nature Reserve16 miles (26 km)Explore 9,600 acres of grazing marsh, woodland, salt marsh, sand dunes and foreshore in England's largest Nature Reserve. The walk begins at Burnham Overy Staithe, following Overy Creek to the beach at Holkham Bay. You continue east to Wells-Next-The-Sea, passing the pretty harbour on the way before reaching Stiffkey Salt Marsh where you will find a vast open expanse of salt marshes with large numbers of birdlife including waders and wintering wildfowl. You continue to Morston where you can catch a boat to Blakeney Point Nature Reserve with its colonies of seals. The final stretch takes you through Blakeney to Cley-Next-The-Sea and the Cley Marshes Nature Reserve. This 430 acre reserve contains reed beds, freshwater marsh, pools and wet meadows.
Holkham Nature Reserve really is a special place with its wonderful mixture of habitats. You will pass through a maze of creeks and saltings, dunes and sandspits, woodland, green pastures and grazing marshes. There is also a huge variety of wildlife to see with pink-footed geese, white-fronted geese, brent geese, wigeon and waders regular visitors to the reserve.
To continue your wildlife watching in North Norfolk you could head to the splendid Pensthorpe Natural Park near Fakenham. It has several lakes and woodland trails with various wildfowl and red squirrels to look out for. View Full Details>>
Hoo Peninsula Path19 miles (30 km)Explore the special scenery of the Hoo Peninsula on this waterside walk in Kent. The path runs along the River Thames estuary with a huge number of wading birds to look out for on the way. It runs for about 18 miles from Gravesend in the west, to the village of Allhallows at the eastern end of the path. On the way you'll pass a series of pretty bays, Cliffe Pools Nature Reserve, Blyth Sands, Halstow Marshes and St Mary's Marshes. The scenery is varied with grazing marsh, intertidal mudflats, saltmarsh and lagoons.
To explore the area by bike you can follow the Heron Trail cycle route across the peninsula. Walkers can follow the Saxon Shore Way long distance path.
This walk passes the splendid Cliffe Pools nature reserve which is well worth exploring further. It's an RSPB site with a number of lagoons and birds such as lapwings, redshanks, warblers, corn and reed buntings, linnets, stonechats and skylarks to look out for. View Full Details>>
Hurst Castle Spit4 miles (7 km)Walk along this long shingle spit to one of Henry VIII's Device Forts on this lovely coastal walk in Hampshire. The walk starts at Keyhaven in between Lymington and Milford-on-Sea. You follow the shingle spit for about 1.5 miles out to the castle where there are splendid views of the nearby Isle of Wight and the south coast.
If you would like to continue your walk you could follow the sea wall through Keyhaven Marshes towards Lymington. View Full Details>>
Isle of Portland8 miles (13 km)Follow the Portland Coast Path around the Isle of Portland on this wonderful coastal walk in Dorset. There's spectacular cliffs, wide ranging views and lots of seabirds to look out for on this exhilarating walk.
The walk starts near the village of Fortuneswell at the northern end of the Isle. You'll start by passing the King Barrow Quarry Nature Reserve which is well know for its wildflowers, blue butterflies and bird species. The path then takes you to the coast at West Cliff where there are lovely views over West Bay. You head south along the coast to Weston and Portland Bill Lighthouse at the southern tip of the Isle of Portland. Here you can enter the lighthouse and climb to the top for some truly wonderful views. This is probably the most expansive view along the south coast with Durlston Head and Start Point in Devon visible on a clear day.
The return leg takes you along the eastern side of the Isle, passing Southwell, Easton and the Broadcroft Quarry Butterfly Reserve. Other highlights include Durdle Pier, a disused 17th-century stone shipping quay. Look out for wildlife including peregrines, guillemots, fulmars and kittiwakes.
To extend your walking in the area you can visit the wonderful Chesil Beach. View Full Details>>
Kent Coast207 miles (333 km)Walk the entirety of the beautiful Kent Coast on this long distance walk. View Full Details>>
Kilve Beach and East Quantoxhead3 miles (5.5 km)This circular walk explores a beautiful area of coast and countryside in the Quantocks.
The walk starts at the large car park just north of Kilve. It's a short walk from here to the fascinating Kilve Beach. Part of the Jurassic coastline the beach is a good place for fossil hunting. You'll also pass the Oil retort which was built in 1924 to burn the oil rich shale beds here. Though the venture failed the old building remains.
The footpath passes along the coast with great views of the cliffs and surrounding countryside. You then turn inland to the village of East Quantoxhead. It's a pretty place with thatched cottages, a medieval tithe barn, a duck pond, a mill house and an interesting manor house with a medieval tower. The route then leaves the village and passes more countryside and some woodland before returning you to the car park. View Full Details>>
Kimmeridge Bay to Chapmans Pool9 miles (14 km)This circular walk takes you along the South West Coast Path to two noteable highlights on the Jurassic Coast.
The beautiful Kimmeridge Bay is part of the Purbeck Marine Wildlife Reserve. On the beach you will find a number of rock-pools where you can look out for a variety of marine wildlife.  From here you can head east along the South West Coast Path to the lovely Chapman's Pool. The walk passes Clavell Tower and Egmont Point where there is a pretty waterfall.
From Chapman's Pool the return leg climbs through the countryside above Kimmeridge. You'll pass Smedmore Hill and Swyre Head before returning to Kimmeridge. The views on this elevated section of the coast and countryside are simply stunning.
Just to the west of Kimmeridge you will find the Lulworth Range Walks. The military owned area is only open to the public at certain times (most weekends). There are some lovely walking trails here with climbs to Povington Hill (191 m) and the range's highest point, Ridgeway Hill (199 m) with fabulous views over the Purbeck Hills and the coastline.
You can also reach the bay by following The Hardy Way from Wareham or Corfe Castle. View Full Details>>
Kintyre Way89 miles (144 km)This walk runs from Tarbert at the north end of the Kintyre peninsula, to Dunaverty in the south. You will discover hidden coves, deserted beaches and tiny fishing communities on this beautiful walk through Argyll & Bute. There are stunning views of the Isle of Jura, the Isle of Arran and the nearby Isle of Gigha. There are also fabulous long coastal sections and lochside walks around Loch Ciaran and Lussa Loch.
Most of the route is waymarked by blue posts with the Kintyre Way logo on them. View Full Details>>
Knott End3 miles (5.5 km)Enjoy a circular walk around this pretty coastal village in Lancashire. In the summer months you can catch the Knott End Ferry from Fleetwood to Knott End on Sea. It's a lovely spot with nice views over the estuary of the River Wyre and Morecambe Bay. There's also lots of pretty cottages and coastal wildlife to look out for.
Starting from the ferry terminal you can follow waymarked footpaths south along the Wyre Way before crossing the golf course and returning to the village. On the eastern side of the golf course you can also visit the village of Preesall. After your walk there are nice cafes and a pub where you can enjoy refreshments.
To continue your walking in the area you can pick up the Lancashire Coastal Way and head east towards Pilling. Heading west past Fleetwood will take you around the coast to Cleveleys and Blackpool.
On the other side of the river you will find the pretty Wyre Estuary Country Park which has more nice footpaths and views. View Full Details>>
Lancashire Coastal Way65 miles (105 km)Travel along the beautiful Lancashire coast from Silverdale to Freckleton on this fairly easy walk.
You start off at Silverdale and head south to Morecambe Bay passing Warton and Bolton-Le-Sands. At Morecambe you'll pass the Eric Morecambe statue with great views over the bay towards the Lake District. There's also a great deal of coastal wildlife to look out for including Cormorants, Curlews, Lapwings and Oystercatchers. The area includes Hest Bank and is a RSPB reserve with sandflats and saltmarshes that attract thousands of birds. As such it is considered the second most important estuary in the UK.
 From Morecambe you head inland towards Lancaster and along the River Lune to Glasson.
The next section takes you to Knott End on Sea where you catch the ferry to Fleetwood and continue south towards the world famous seaside resort of Blackpool with the iconic tower and pleasure beach.
The final section runs through the pretty resort of Lytham St Annes with Fairhaven Lake at Ansdell, views over the Ribble Estuary and the landmark windmill on Lytham front the highlights. From Lytham you continue to the finish point at the village of Freckleton. There's lots of wildlife to look out for on the river and views of the planes taking off as you pass Warton Aerodrome on this final leg. There's also good views of the Pennine Hills and the Bowland Hills as you finish the walk. View Full Details>>
Lawrenny Quay and the Daugleddau River3 miles (5 km)Enjoy woodland trails and riverside paths on this walk in the heart of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. Although most of the park lies on or near the coast this area is unusual in that it lies several miles inland.
The little village of Lawrenny lies on a peninsula of the Cleddau estuary. The walk starts from the pretty Lawrenny Quay where this is a yacht club, pub and the popular tea rooms. The walk then picks up the Landsker Borderlands Trail and passes through Lawrenny Wood with views of the Daugleddau River. There are also nice glimpses through the trees to Benton Castle on the other side of the river. You continue along the Daugleddau to Garron Pill where you can either head south to Lawrenny village or you can just return the same way. At the end of your walk you can reward yourself with food and drink at the splendid Lawrenny Quayside where you can sit outside and enjoy great views of the river.
If you would like to continue your walk then you could head east along the Cresswell River to Cresswell Quay, using the Landsker Borderlands Trail. Carew Castle is also nearby, just a few miles south of Cresswell Quay. View Full Details>>
Leysdown Coastal Park6 miles (9 km)Enjoy fabulous views of the Thames Estuary on this circular walk through Leysdon Coastal park and Leysdon Marshes on the Isle of Sheppey. For cyclists please see the Isle of Harty Trail which also runs through the park. View Full Details>>
Lindisfarne Castle and Holy Island4 miles (6 km)This is an atmospheric circular walk around the fascinating Holy Island in Northumberland. You will visit the dramatic 16th century castle, the beautiful walled castle garden and the nearby lime kilns. The route also passes the ruins of the ancient Lindisfarne Priory.
The coastal scenery is also beautiful with views of the Lindisfarne National Nature Reserve where you can see a variety of wildlife. View Full Details>>
Lizard Point to Kynance Cove9 miles (14 km)This circular walk takes you from Lizard Point to Kynance Cove and then visits the Lizard National Nature Reserve and the little village of Cadgwith on the Cornish Coast. There's some truly spectacular coastal scenery with stunning coves, beautiful beaches, turquoise seas and imposing cliffs.
You start off at the Lizard Point car park and head around Lizard Point, the most southerly place in Britain. It's a beautiful and unique area with interesting geological formations and a variety of flora and fauna.
The walk continues north to Kynance Cove via Crane Ledges and Pentreath Beach. Kynance Cove has spectacular cliffs, stacks, arches and islands of serpentine rock while the beach is considered one the most beautiful in the world. The area is also covered with attractive heathland and a variety of rare coastal plants.
From Kynance Cove you head inland across the Lizard National Nature Reserve and Lizard Downs to Cadgwith. The tiny fishing village is very picturesque with thatched cottages and a pretty stream trickling over the sand and shingle beach. At Cadgwith you pick up the coast path again to take you back to the car park. On this final section you pass interesting geological features such as Whale Rock and the Devil's Frying Pan. The latter was formed from the collapsed roof of a sea cave with a remaining arch of rock.
The walk is also great for wildlife spotting. Look out for grey seals in the water and the Cornish Chough in the air.
The walk can be extended by continuing along the South West Coast Path to Mullion Cove, north of Kynance Cove. The cove is another feature of this lovely section of coast with its pretty harbour and surrounding cliffs. View Full Details>>
Llyn Coastal Path81 miles (130 km)Follow the Llyn Peninsula from Caernarfon to Porthmadog on this stunning coastal walk. The route is often completed in 7 sections:

Caernarfon to Trefor
Trefor to Morfa Nefyn
Morfa Nefyn to Llangwnnadl
Llangwnnadl to Aberdaron
Aberdaron to Abersoch
Abersoch to Pwllheli
Pwllheli to Porthmadog

As well as the stunning scenery you can look out for bottle-nosed dolphins and Atlantic grey seals as these are often seen off the coast. Near Trefor you can enjoy wonderful views of the three peaks of Yr Eifl.
The walk is waymarked with a blue, green and white logo. View Full Details>>
Looe to Polperro5 miles (8.5 km)This is a popular walk between these two Cornish coastal villages. It follows the South West Coast Path for just over 5 miles with stunning views all the way.
The walk starts in East Looe near the tourist information centre. The town has a lovely beach, pier, pretty harbour and picturesque Cornish cottages. After passing through East Looe you cross the bridge over the Looe Estuary into West Looe and follow the coast round to Hannafore (you can see some of this section on the google street view link below). There's great views of Looe Bay and towards the idyllic Looe Island on this section of the walk.
From Hannafore you continue to Talland, passing Samphire Beach and Portnadler Bay. At Talland Bay you will find two nice shingle beaches called Talland Sand and Rotterdam Beach. There is also a church dating from the 15th century and a cafe where you stop for refreshments.
The final section takes you from Talland to Polperro, passing the memorial at Downend Point and Chapel Cliff. The town has a lovely harbour and rows of ancient fishermen's cottages to admire.
To extend your walking in the area you could continue west along the coast to the lovely town of Fowey. Here you can try the circular Fowey Hall Walk which takes in two ferry crossings and includes waterside sections along Pont Pill and Fowey Quay.
In Looe you can follow the Looe River north west from the town centre to the pretty Kilminorth Woods Nature Reserve. The reserve has an abundance of flora and fauna with primroses, bluebells and dog violets to look out for. Wildlife includes herons, sparrowhawks, peregrines, roe deer and woodpeckers. The woods also have a nice off road cycling trail to try.
Also of interest is the beautiful Looe Island. You can catch a boat from East Looe to the pretty island and enjoy a guided walk. Look out for grey seals and a variety of birdlife on your visit. View Full Details>>
Lower Leas Coastal Park2 miles (4 km)This coastal country park is located in Folkestone and has fabulous views over the Kent coastline. National Cycle Route 2 also runs through the park.
The park is divided into three zones. These include a formal zone with lovely gardens and pine avenues. The fun zone includes a free adventure play area and an amphitheatre. Finally, there's the wild zone with lots of interesting flora and fauna to look out for.
You can extend your walking in the area by try our Dover to Folkestone Walk. It will take you east to the Folkestone Roman Villa and the nearby East Cliff and Warren Country Park. There's great views to be had from the elevated position of the park. View Full Details>>
Lulworth Cove to Durdle Door4 miles (6.5 km)Take in two of the Jurassic Coast's most spectacular natural features on this short walk in Dorset. The walk starts at the pretty village of West Lulworth where you will find rows of pretty cottages and the Castle Inn - one of the oldest pubs in Dorset dating from the 16th Century. The trail then takes you to the coast and the beautiful Lulworth Cove. This sheltered bay is enclosed almost in a circle and was formed 10,000 years ago by the combined forces of a river and the sea. Next to the cove you will pass the West Lulworth Heritage Centre which contains a museum about the coast and the village.
From the cove you follow the South West Coast Path west towards Durdle Door. This spectacular natural limestone arch also has an adjacent beach and caves. The walk then takes you back to West Lulworth along countryside walking trails.
There is ample parking at Lulworth Cove. If you are coming by public transport you could get the train to Wool and then a connecting bus to the cove.
The walk can be extended by heading a few miles west and visiting the beautiful Ringstead Bay. View Full Details>>
Lulworth Range Walks4 miles (6 km)This circular walk in Dorset visits the deserted village of Tyneham before heading along the coast at Brandy Bay and Worbarrow Bay. It is part of the Lulworth Range Walks in the Purbeck Hills near Kimmeridge Bay. The range walks are open most weekends but check the website below for more details.
The walk starts from the car park in Tyneham Village with its interesting ruined buildings. You then head to the South West Coast Path where there are lovely views along the coast to Brandy Bay, Horbarrow Bay and Kimmeridge Bay. The route continues west along the coast to Worbarrow Tout and the beautiful Worbarrow Bay. A climb to the Iron Age Hill Fort at Flower Barrow is quite challenging but you are rewarded with more magnificent coastal views. The route continues to Whiteway Hill before descending back into Tyneham.
The area is owned by the military and while this restricts access it does encourage a wide variety of interesting flora and fauna. Look out for rare flowers, fungi and insects as you make your way through this lovely area.
The walk can easily be extended by heading east to the nearby Povington Hill (191 m) and the range's highest point, Ridgeway Hill (199 m).  Here you will find the pretty Stonehill Downs Nature Reserve where there is a variety of birdlife to look out for. View Full Details>>
Lyme Regis to Charmouth4 miles (7 km)Follow the coastal path from Lyme Regis to Charmouth on this popular walk in West Dorset. This circular walk follows the South West Coast Path from the centre of Lyme Regis to the pretty village of Charmouth before returning along the beach.
You start the walk in Lyme Regis and climb towards the golf course above Timber Hill. The path crosses the golf course and the woodland on Fern Hill before descending to Charmouth. After exploring the village you then pass along the beach to return to Lyme Regis. You'll pass the striking cliffs at Black Ven and the Spittles which are a well know fossil hunting spot. Please note it's wise to check the tide times before walking back along the beach. The tide should be going out before you start the return leg. If it is coming in then return on the same path above the towns.
If you would like to extend your walk you could try the circular Charmouth Walk. It visits Stonebarrow Hill and includes some lovely cliff top scenery, beautiful beaches and a range of interesting flora and fauna. Continue east and you can visit the splendid Golden Cap Estate. View Full Details>>
Lyme Regis to Seaton Undercliff Walk7 miles (11.5 km)Travel from Dorset into Devon on this popular walk through the Undercliff National Nature Reserve. The reserve is one of the highlights on the Jurassic Coast with a wide variety of flora and fauna to look out for.
It's a 7 mile walk with some challenging climbs and wonderful clifftop coastal scenery. The stretch of coast is of high geological significance containing rocks from the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods of geological time. It's also botanically diverse with species rich chalk grassland, holm oak, rhododendron, orchids and laurel.
Starting on the sea front in Lyme Regis you pick up the South West Coast Path and head west past the famous Cobb. The path then climbs to the Ware Cliffs via Chimney Rock. Ware Cliffs have nice lush green vegetation with a high point of 137 metres (449 ft) at Black Ven. The cliffs are thought to be around 199-189 million years old.
You continue west to the lovely Pinhay Bay where there are more tall cliffs and some rugged terrain. The next stage takes you past Whitlands Cliff to Charton Bay, before coming to the splendid Axe Estuary Nature Reserve at Axmouth. It's a great place for birdwatching with many different types of wildfowl and wading birds to look out for.
After crossing the Axe Estuary the walk finishes on the front at Seaton.
You can extend your walking in Seaton by heading north along the Seaton Tramway Walk through the Seaton Marshes to Colyford. The marshes are just north of the town and include ditches and ponds that attract a large variety of wildfowl, waders and butterflies.
If you continue west along the South West Coast Path you will soon come to the villages of Beer and Branscombe. Here you can try the wonderful Branscombe to Beer Walk which takes you past the stunning Hooken Cliffs, Jurassic Coast UNESCO World Heritage Site. View Full Details>>
Lynton and Lynmouth7 miles (11 km)The town of Lynton and village of Lynmouth sit side by side on the Exmoor coast in north Devon. It's a splendid place for walkers with a number of long distance trails passing through the beautiful area. As well as the wonderful coastal views there's also nice woodland trails and riverside paths along the East Lyn River.
This 7 mile circular walk visits some of the highlights of the area using waymarked trails on good paths. Starting in the centre of Lynton you first follow a section of the South West Coast Path east towards the picturesque harbour village of Lynmouth. The path descends to the village which sits at the confluence of the West Lyn and East Lyn rivers, in a gorge 700 feet (210 m) below Lynton. You continue towards Countisbury where you can climb to Foreland Point Lighthouse at the most northerly point along the Devon and Exmoor coast. From here there are great views across the Bristol Channel to the Welsh coast. The route then descends back to the hamlet of Countisbury before coming to Watersmeet. The delightful area includes 2000 acres of river gorge and woodland with the opportunity for refreshments at the riverside tea garden at Watersmeet House.
The walk then follows a section of the Tarka Trail back to Lynton.
There's lots of good options for continuing your walking in the area. One of the highlights is the climb to the Valley of the Rocks. This dry valley contains the geological marvels known as the Lynton Beds.
You could follow the South West Coast Path east and visit Culbone Wood and the delightful village of Porlock Weir.
You could also follow the Two Moors Way and Tarka Trail south to the Cheriton Ridge in the Exmoor National Park.
The Samaritans Way South West also passes through the area. View Full Details>>
Margate to Broadstairs Coastal Walk6 miles (9 km)This walk follows a section of the Thanet Coastal Path between these two major Kent towns. You'll pass a number of pretty beaches and bays including the every popular Botany Bay. It's also an area with connections to Charles Dickens, with the walk passing Bleak House, the former home of the famous 19th century author. The walk is fairly easy going with most of the route taking place on flat, waymarked footpaths.
The walk starts in Margate near to the train station. You head east along the beach passing the noteworthy Turner Contemporary Gallery. It is situated on the seafront, on the same site as the boarding house where J. M. W. Turner stayed when visiting the town.
You continue past Walpole Bay to Palm Bay in Cliftonville where you will often see water skiing and jet skis. Shortly after you come to Foreness Point which extends a short distance into the entrance of the Thames Estuary. It sits just to the west of Botany Bay, a popular spot with its lovely beach and notable chalk cliffs.
After enjoying Botany Bay, the path continues to Kingsgate Bay where you will pass Kingsgate Castle. The castle was built for Lord Holland in the 1760s as the stable block of his nearby country residence Holland House. The castle sits just to the north of the chalk headland of North Foreland where there's a fine lighthouse and good views over the North Sea.
The final section heads south past Joss Bay to Broadstairs and Bleak House. The house was built in 1801 and resides on a cliff overlooking North Foreland and Viking Bay. Charles Dickens spent summer holidays at the house in the 1850s and 1860s and wrote David Copperfield there.
Broadstairs is a very attractive seaside resort with a nice beach, good cafes and two 1950's ice-cream parlours called Morelli's and Chiappini's. There's also a number of good museums including the Dickens House Museum where you can see a variety of Dickens memorabilia including letters written about Broadstairs, his writing box and mahogany sideboard. In June, there is a week-long Dickens Festival with costumed characters, talks and plays.  View Full Details>>
Marloes Sands2 miles (3 km)This short circular walk visits the beautiful Marloes Peninsula on the Pembrokeshire Coast. The National Trust managed area also includes Marloes Mere and the lovely beaches of Marloes Sands. There's great views towards Gateholme Island and Skomer Island with attractive coastal vegetation including heather and gorse. There's also lots of interesting wildlife with Welsh Mountain ponies, various sea birds and seal pups to look out for.
The walk starts from the National Trust car park just to the west of Marloes village. From here you can pick up the footpath heading west past the pretty mere, where you can look out for various birds from the hide. The path continues to the coast where you pick up the coast path to Marloes Sands. After passing along the sands you can pick up another path to take you back through the countryside to the car park.
The sands are on the Pembrokeshire Coast Path so you can easily extend your walk by picking up the trail. Heading north west will take you past a series of pretty bays to Martin's Haven. Here you can catch a boat to Skomer Island where you can look out for a huge variety of wildlife including Puffins, Manx Shearwaters, Dolphins, Harbour Porpoises, Razorbills, Gannets and Fulmars. View Full Details>>
Marwick Head3 miles (5 km)This RSPB Nature Reserve has some splendid coastal scenery and the largest cliff-nesting seabird colony on Orkney Mainland. Walk along the red sandstone cliffs and look out for up to 25,000 breeding seabirds. The walk also visits The Kitchener Memorial which commemorates Lord Kitchener and the crew of HMS Hampshire, which struck a mine and sank nearby on 5 June 1916. Parking is available at route start at the Marwick Bay car park.
If you would like to continue your walk then the Brough of Birsay is just a mile or so up the coast from Marwick Head. View Full Details>>
Millennium Coastal Park Llanelli14 miles (22 km)This fabulous country park in Carmarthenshire has miles of coastal cycling and walking paths to enjoy. You can follow National Cycle Route 4 along a super traffic free path which passes along the beautiful Loughor estuary and the Gower peninsula. The route takes you past Llanelli beach and Tywyn beach to Burry Port where you will find a pretty harbour, beach and the newest marina in Wales. You then head back east passing Sandy Water Park and Machynys beach before coming to the National Wetlands Centre where you can look out for a variety of birdlife. Look out for flocks of dunlin, ringed plover, sanderling and redshank along the coast whilst shelduck, oystercatcher and curlew can be seen further out on the mudflats.
Other highlights in the park include the excellent Discovery Centre where you will find a wealth of information about the area in a fabulous modern building.
If you would like to continue your outing you could head west along the coast to the fabulous Pembrey Country Park where you will find more lovely coastal scenery, woodland wildlife trails and bike hire from the Ski Pembrey centre. View Full Details>>
Mineral Tramways Trail15 miles (24 km)This is a fabulous, largely traffic free ride or walk, from Portreath to Devoran. It is known as the Mineral Tramways Coast to Coast trail taking you on a tour of some of Cornwall's historic mine buildings.
The path starts on the coast at Portreath and heads through Wheal Rose, Todpool and Bissoe to Devoran. As well as the series of restored mines you will pass the beautiful Bissoe Valley Nature Reserve. The reserve was a former mine site and has heathland, woodland, ponds and variety of widlife. View Full Details>>
Moray Coast Trail44 miles (71 km)Explore the beautiful Moray Coast on this delightful trail. The route runs from Forres to Cullen and includes beaches, coastal paths, quiet roads and old railways. There are splendid views of the Moray Firth and the North Sea.
The walk is waymarked with a white bird on a black disc. View Full Details>>
Morecambe Bay12 miles (19 km)Enjoy a visit to the Morecambe Bay Nature Reserve and a stroll along the Lancaster Canal on this circular cycle or walk in Lancashire.
The walk starts in the town centre of Morecambe near to the train station. You then pick up the Lancashire Coastal Way to take you along the promenade towards Hest Bank and Bolton-le-Sands. You'll pass the Eric Morecambe statue with great views over the bay towards the Lake District. There's also a great deal of coastal wildlife to look out for including Cormorants, Curlews, Lapwings and Oystercatchers. The area is a RSPB reserve with sandflats and saltmarshes that attract thousands of birds. As such it is considered the second most important estuary in the UK. 
From Hest Bank you turn inland and follow the Lancaster Canal into Lancaster before another waterside sectoin along the River Lune. A shared footpath and cycleway then returns you to Morecambe though White Lund.
To continue your walking in the area you can head along the Lancashire Coastal Way to Carnforth.
You can also head south of Heysham and visit the delightful Sunderland Point. It's a lovely place for a walk with coastal views, salt marsh, beach, mud flats, farmland and lots of wildlife to look out for. There's also a series of attractive Georgian houses by the quay. View Full Details>>
Mortehoe Circular5 miles (7.5 km)This circular walk from Mortehoe visits Morte Point, Rockham Bay and Bull Point on the North Devon Coast. It's a lovely section of Exmoor coast with dramatic cliffs, beautiful countryside and pretty beaches. The area is managed by the National Trust so there are good footpaths and facilities in the area.
The walk starts from the village of Mortehoe where there is a village car park. You follow a footpath through the countryside to Morte Point where there are some fascinating rock formations and great views towards Lundy Island. You then head east along the coast path to Bull Point, passing the lovely Rockham Bay and beach on the way. You should see lots of pretty wildlflowers in the summer along this stretch.
Just after Bull Point you pick up an inland footpath which takes you back to the village. Here you can enjoy refreshments at the Smuggler's Rest pub. You could also visit the Mortehoe Musuem and learn about the interesting history of smuggling and shipwrecks in the area.
It's easy to extend your walking in this lovely area by heading along the coast path to nearby Ilfracombe via Lee Bay. You could also visit the Woolacombe with it's beautiful beaches and beyond that Baggy Point. View Full Details>>
Mumbles Circular3 miles (5.5 km)This circular walk takes you around the Mumbles headland on the on the western edge of Swansea Bay. It starts by the bus station and information centre near Oystermouth Castle. It's well worth exploring the ruins of the 12 century Norman Castle before starting the coastal walk. There are lovely views over the bay from the castle grounds.
You head along the coast to Mumbles Head where there is a lifeboat station and long pier. From here there are great views out to Mumbles Head and the lighthouse.
You continue along the coast, passing Bracelet Bay and Limeslade Bay before heading to the lovely Langland Bay. There's a nice beach here and great views down the Gower coast.
If you'd like to extend your walk you could continue along the Gower coast and visit the delightful Bishopston Valley and visit the beautiful secluded beach at Pwll Du Bay. View Full Details>>
Muncaster Castle4 miles (6 km)Enjoy an easy stroll around the beautiful grounds and gardens of this Grade I listed building in Ravenglass. There are 77 acres of beautiful gardens to explore and over 6 miles of walking paths through the estate. Visit the bluebell wood, the wildflower meadow, the Japanese garden, the Himalayan garden and the pretty Dragonfly pond.
If you would like to continue your walk then you can follow Cumbria Coastal Way which runs through Ravenglass. It's a beautiful area located on the estuaries of three rivers - the Esk, Mite and Irt. The Drigg, Dunes and Irt Estuary Nature Reserve is also a great place for bird watching. View Full Details>>
Murlough Bay4 miles (6.6 km)This walk explores the beautiful Murlough National Nature Reserve near Newcastle in Northern Ireland. The reserve is managed by the National Trust so there's a car park, visitor centre, and a network of well laid out footpaths. The reserve consists of a 6000 year old sand dune system, woodland, heath and a wonderful beach. The views across Dundram Inner Bay towards the Mourne Mountains are also exceptional.
The reserve is great for wildlife watching with a wide variety of wintering wildfowl and waders to look out for on the coast. There's also 720 species of butterflies and moths to look out for around the pretty wildlflowers meadows.
There's lots of good options for extending your walking in the Newcastle area. You could head to Tollymore Forest Park just to the south west of the reserve. The fantastic 1600 acre park contains an arboretum, the Shimna River and two forested hills known as the Drinns. Also nearby is the splendid climb to Slieve Donard and Castlewellan Forest Park. View Full Details>>
Nash Point4 miles (6.5 km)This coastal circular walk in the Vale of Glamorgan visits Nash Point Lighthouse on the Monknash Coast. The stretch of coast is popular with hikers with cliff top views, nice beaches and a visit to the Grade II listed lighthouse, which dates from 1831-32.
You can park at the Nash Point car park, just south of Marcross. From here it is a short walk to the coastal path and the lighthouse. You follow the path east to St Donat's Point, with nice views of St Donat's Bay, Tresilian Bay and the Bristol Channel. The route then heads inland, towards the medieval castle of St Donat's. After rounding the castle, you follow public footpaths through the countryside towards Marcross where you pick up the Marcross Brook to take you back to the car park.
You can extend the walk by heading east towards Llantwit Major beach. View Full Details>>
Newquay to Perranporth11 miles (18 km)This is a popular coastal walk between Newquay and Perranporth along a section of the South West Coast Path. The walk is about 11 miles so it's perfect for a day's outing. It's a fantastic stretch of coast with lovely beaches, exhilirating cliff tops and beautiful bays. At Perranporth you can enjoy refreshments before catching the bus back to Newquay.
The walk starts off in the centre of the popular tourist town of Newquay, near to the train station and the bus station. You then follow the coast path through the town towards Towan Head where there are lovely views over the Newquay beaches. The path then heads along the popular surfing spot of Fistral Beach. You then cross the River Gannel to Crantock Sands which may require the use of the ferry at high tide. The route then visits Pentire Point and Kelsey Head before descending to the beautiful Holywell Beach which has a wonderful dune system and is managed by the National Trust. The route then rounds Penhale Point before crossing Penhale Sands which has the most extensive system of sand dunes in Cornwall.  After crossing the sands you arrive at the pretty little town of Perranporth where you can enjoy a well earned drink at the UK's only bar on the beach.
To extend your walk you can continue along the coast path to St Agnes Head and enjoy a climb to St Agnes Beacon and a visit to the fascinating ruins of the Wheal Coates tin mine. Beyond that is the pretty village of Porthtowan. View Full Details>>
North Wirral Coastal Park3 miles (5 km)Enjoy a cycle or walk around this super coastal country park in the Wirral. The park covers 400 acres making it the largest park in the Wirral. There is a super waterside cycling and walking path running along the lovely Wirral Peninsula - you could even continue along it to Wallasey and beyond if you have time.
The park is excellent for birdwatching as the area attracts huge numbers of wading birds, including Oystercatcher, Common Redshank, Dunlin, Sanderling, Ruddy Turnstone, Northern Lapwing, Bar-tailed Godwit and Curlew. The route below also continues to the nearby Ditton Lane Nature Reserve - another great spot for birdwatching.
The park is located very near to Leasowe rail station. View Full Details>>
Old Harry Rocks4 miles (6 km)This circular walk visits the local landmark of Old Harry Rocks on the Dorset coast, near Studland. It's a popular walk with wonderful views towards Sandbanks, Poole Harbour and the Isle of Wight.
The three striking chalk formations mark the most easterly point of the Jurassic Coast. The rocks are thought to be named after Harry Paye, the infamous Poole pirate. His ship would lay in wait for passing merchant ships, using the rocks as cover.
You can park at the South Beach car park in Studland to start your walk. From here you pick up a nice flat footpath along the South West Coast Path to take you to the rocks. It's about a one mile stroll from the parking area to the rocks, with a seated viewpoint along the way. The path passes through chalk grassland with lots of pretty wildflowers to look out for in the summer months.
From the rocks you can then climb towards Ballard Point where you pick up a section of the Purbeck Way to take you across Ballard Down. You then descend back into Studland on a country lane, passing the Glebeland Estate. The route then heads to the pretty Norman Church of St Nicholas which dates from the 12th century, although there has been a church on this site from Saxon times. You can follow a public footpath through the church grounds which leads you back to the car park.
At the end of your walk you can enjoy refreshments at the Bankes Arms pub on Manor Road. It has a great beer garden overlooking Studland Bay.
To extend your walking in the area you could head north and explore the lovely Studland Heath Nature Reserve. Here you will find way marked trails taking you through sand dunes and heathland with a variety of wildlife to look out for.
Continuing west along the Purbeck Way from Ballard Down will take you to the village of Corfe Castle with its ruined castle and pretty cottages.
You can virtually explore the area around Old Harry by clicking on the Google Street View link below. View Full Details>>
Oxwich Bay Circular4 miles (6.5 km)This circular walk explores the area surrounding Oxwich Bay on the Gower Peninsula. The Travel Magazine named Oxwich beach the most beautiful in Britain.
You start at the car park in Oxwich and head along the coast through Oxwich Wood before continuing to Oxwich point where there are splendid coastal views. On the way you will pass the fascinating St Illtud's Church. Founded in the 6th century the church has an interesting stone font and tranquil grounds.
From Oxwich point you continue around the southern part of the headland with views over Port-Eynon Bay. Footpaths through the countryside then take you back to Oxwich via the fine ruins of Oxwich Castle. The route then heads through the lovely sand dunes of Oxwich Burrows Nature Reserve where you can look out for a variety of flora and fauna. These include more than 600 species of plants such as Bee Orchids and Early Marsh-orchids.
The area also includes a freshwater lake, salt marsh and the pretty stream of Nicholaston Pill. Look out for birds including Cetti's Warblers, Sedge Warblers and Bittern.
If you'd like to continue your exercise then you could try the Three Cliffs Bay Walk which visits Nicholaston Burrows and Penmaen Burrows. The video below shows a walk from Oxwich to Three Cliffs also.
You could also continue along the coast path to the village of Port Eynon via Horton. It's a lovely walk passing along the coast with views of Port Eynon Bay and beach. View Full Details>>
Pagham Harbour6 miles (10 km)Enjoy a walk around this lovely coastal nature reserve and look out for thousands of wading birds. The reserve is located a few miles south of Chichester, near the village of Pagham. You can park at the reserve car park, just off the Chichester Road. From here you can pick up the waterside footpaths to Sidlesham Quay and then around the site to Pagham Lagoon. There's a wide variety of habitats with salt marsh, mudflats, farmland, copses, lagoons, reed beds and shingle beaches. Look out for birds including little egrets, ringed plovers and lapwings.
To extend your walking in the area you can pick up the New Lipchis Way at nearby West Wittering. The long distance path will take you along the Chichester Channel in to Chichester.
Just to the south of the harbour you will find Selsey Bill. The coastal headland is the southernmost point of Sussex.
Around Birdham you can also pick up the Chichester Canal and enjoy a waterside walk along the towpath.
Just to the south of the harbour you will find the headland at Selsey Bill. It is the southernmost point of Sussex and has a nice beach and fish huts selling fine fresh fish. View Full Details>>
Paignton to Brixham5 miles (8 km)This is a popular coastal walk between these two lovely Torbay towns. It's about a 5 mile walk with the option of returning by bus or walking back the same way if you prefer. It's a beautiful stretch of coast with a number of pretty beaches, sheltered coves and a nice woodland section.
Start the walk from Paignton Sands near to the train station and follow the South West Coast Path south to Goodrington Sands. You continue to Broadsands where there is another lovely little beach and a pitch and putt course on the adjacent headland. There's also good views of the Dartmouth Steam Railway, which crosses two Brunel viaducts near the beach.
After leaving Broadsands you head around the Churston Golf Club and through The Grove, an ancient, semi-natural woodland. You then come to the pretty Brixham Battery and Gardens. Here you'll find 14-acres of gardens with an old Battery Observation Post and a 4.7 inch Gun Floor.
The final section takes you to Brixham Harbour and the centre of this attractive coastal fishing port. Look out for the replica of the Golden Hind and the Victorian statue of William of Orange. 
You can extend the walk by continuing east along the coast path to Berry Head Country Park. The coastal park is also a nature reserve with lots of interesting coastal plantlife and a large Guillemot colony.
For a longer route try the Torquay to Brixham Walk. View Full Details>>
Parkgate Circular Walk3 miles (5 km)This fine circular walk explores the village of Parkgate on the River Dee estuary. It's a splendid place for a stroll with great views across the marshes and a wide variety of birdlife to look out for. This includes huge numbers of wildfowl and waders. Keep your eyes peeled for grey herons, egrets, peregrine falcon, merlin, hen harrier and short eared owl.
The route heads along the Parkgate Parade and then follows a section of the Wirral Way cycling and walking trail. It's a flat, easy walk with great views of the village parade on the coastal section and lots of wild flowers and butterflies along the disused railway line.
To extend your walk you can head north along the Wirral Way to Wirral Country Park for more great views across the estuary. View Full Details>>
Paston Way18 miles (29 km)Follow the Paston Way and the Norfolk Coast from Cromer to North Walsham on this splendid walk.
You start at the seaside town of Cromer and head to Overstrand along the cliff top path. After a short inland stretch the route rejoins the coast at Mundesley, passing along the sea front towards Bacton. The final stretch takes you inland towards the finish point at North Walsham.
Highlights on the route include the wonderful coastal scenery and pretty seaside towns. View Full Details>>
Peddars Way and Norfolk Coast Path93 miles (150 km)The Peddars Way & Norfolk Coast Path begins at Knettishall Heath Country Park in Suffolk and takes you to Holme next the sea on the Norfolk coast along designated footpaths. Some wonderful coastal scenery then follows as you head east along the Norfolk coast path from Hunstanton to Cromer. View Full Details>>
Pembrey Country Park7 miles (12 km)With stunning views of the Gower Peninsula and Carmarthen Bay this coastal country park is one of the most popular in the UK. It is perfect for a long cycle or walk with numerous well laid trails, National Cycle Network route 4 and St Illtyd's Walk all running through the park and the adjacent Pembrey Forest.
Highlights include the gorgeous Cefn Sidan beach with 8 miles of golden sand and extensive dunes. There are also 8 Wildlife trails, the beautiful Corsican pine forest and a Conservation pond with bird hides.
The off road cycle trail is perfect for a family cycle ride - you can bring your own bike or hire one from the Ski Pembrey centre. Here you could also hire some skis and try the dry sky slope in the park! It's a top class facility with an Alpine Ski Lodge, Cafe and a floodlit 130m main slope. There's also a fantastic toboggan run, crazy golf and pony trekking on offer.
If you'd like to continue your walk/cycle then you could head further into the adjacent Pembrey Forest - it covers nearly 2500 acres with several lovely woodland trails and interesting wildlife including sparrowhawk and goshawk. You could also follow National Cycle Route 4 along the coast to Llanelli where you will find the splendid Millennium Coastal Parkor follow St Illtyd's Walk into the beautiful countryside. View Full Details>>
Penmon Point1 miles (1.5 km)This walk on Penmon Point visits the Trwyn Du Lighthouse where you can enjoy lovely views towards Puffin Island, Great Orme and Snowdon. It's a splendid section of the Anglesey Coast with nice pebble beaches, interesting rock formations and some nice coastal countryside. It's also great for wildlife watching with seals and dolphins to look out for. 
You can park at the car park next to the excellent Pilot House cafe and pick up a good walking trail to the lighthouse on Black Point. Then explore the area on more coastal paths. The village of Penmon is also well worth exploring. It has a fascinating history with the 12th century Pemon Priory. Here you can explore the ancients hermits well, the magnificent dove house and the ancients church.
You can extend your walk by heading west along the Anglesey Coast Path and visiting the splendid Red Wharf Bay. Here you'll find beautiful beaches, rock pools and interesting rock formations. The bay is an area of outstanding natural beauty and well worth a visit.
If you head south along the coast path you will soon come to Beaumaris Castle. The 13 century castle is hugely impressive and there are wonderful views over the Menai Strait towards Lavan Sands, Ceredigion and Snowdonia from the coast path. From Beaumaris you can take a boat trip to visit Puffin Island. View Full Details>>
Pennard Castle4 miles (6 km)Visit this ruined 12th century castle and explore the beautiful Pennard Burrows on this circular walk on the Gower Peninsula. It's a stunning area with a wooded valley and the fresh water river of Pennard Pill.
The walk starts from the large parking area at West Cliff and heads along the coast to Shire Combe with wonderful views over Three Cliffs Bay (you can actually explore this section of the coast path on the google street view link below). There are nice wide grassy footpaths through fields surrounded by gorse bushes on this section. You then head through Pennard Burrows to Pennard Castle, crossing the delightful Pennard Pill on the way. The walk continues to the ruins on sandy paths.  The castle is a grade II listed building and a scheduled ancient monument with a fascinating history stretching back several centuries.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could try the Three Cliffs Bay Walk for more fabulous views. You could also pick up the Gower Way long distance walk or climb the sandstone ridge of Cefn Bryn for magnificent views over the area.
Just a mile to the east is the lovely Bishopston Valley with a pretty river running through a wooded valley to Pwll Du Bay. View Full Details>>
Penrhos Coastal Park2 miles (3.5 km)This lovely coastal park consists of woodland trails and nice coastal views. The area is a country park and nature reserve with waymarked nature trails and lots of wildlife to look out for. Highlights are the resident red squirrels, badgers and various wildfowl around the two large ponds. You can also enjoy a stroll to Penrhos beach. Here you can enjoy splendid views across the bay and study some interesting rock formations.
Cyclists can visit the reserve by following National Cycle Route 8 from Holyhead. It's a lovely ride passing Penrhos beach before arriving at the park.
This route starts at the car park at Penrhos beach and follows a cycling and walking trail through the park to Beddmanarch Bay.
The Anglesey Coast Path runs through the park so you can pick this up to extend your walk. If you follow it along the coast you will come to Breakwater Country Park where you can climb Holyhead Mountain for wonderful views over Anglesey, the Isle of Man, the Skerries and the mountains of Ireland. View Full Details>>
Peter Scott Walk10 miles (16 km)Travel along the Wash on this lovely, easy walk through Norfolk.
The path starts by the River Nene near to Naturalist and painter Sir Peter Scott's lighthouse. You then follow the coastline of the Wash to the Lynn Channel on the River Great Ouse. The river then leads you to the finish point at King's Lynn Ferry.
Wildlife is abundant on this walk with numerous species of bird to look out for including oystercatchers, curlew, redshanks and marsh harriers. View Full Details>>
Plymouth's Waterfront Walkway10 miles (16 km)A nice easy walk along a section of the south west coast path which highlights the city's history and heritage. The walk links the Cremyll Ferry landing stage on the shores of the Tamar with Jennycliff on the eastern side of Plymouth Sound. View Full Details>>
Porlock and Porlock Weir6 miles (9 km)This circular walk from the town of Porlock uses sections of the South West Coast Path and the Coleridge Way to take you on a tour of the coast and woods surrounding the town.
The walk starts in Porock and follows the South West Coast Path east to Bossington before turning west along Porlock Bay to the pretty village of Porlock Weir. It's a very popular area with a lovely harbour and lots of attractive little cottages, many of which date from the 17th century. After exploring the village the walk returns to Porlock via woodland trails around West Porlock.
To extend your walking in the area you can continue along coast path west to Culbone Wood and Foreland Point. If you head north east from Porlock you can enjoy a climb to Bossington Hill where there are splendid views over the surrounding area.
You can also follow the Coleridge Way south into Exmoor and visit Dunkery Beacon - the highest point in Exmoor and Somerset.
Also nearby is the splendid Holnicote Estate where you can climb Selworthy Beacon and Bossington Hill for more great views. View Full Details>>
Porthdinllaen2 miles (4 km)Enjoy stunning coastal views and delightful coastal villages on this walk on the Llyn Peninsula. There are also fine sandy beaches, interesting rock pools and great views to the mountains of Yr Eifl and Snowdonia to enjoy on this bracing walk.
The walk starts from the car park at the little village of Morfa Nefyn. You then walk along the attractive headland to the fishing village of Porthdinllaen where you will find the well known Ty Coch Inn. The distinctive pub is considered one of the best in Wales with its wonderful views over the Irish Sea to The Rivals.
You continue around the headland passing the lifeboat station and heading through the local golf course before returning to the car park. The area is wonderful for wildlife. Look out for a variety of sea birds including oystercatchers, sand martins and cormorants. Grey seals can also be seen around the coast. View Full Details>>
Porthtowan3 miles (5 km)This circular walk explores the coast and countryside surrounding the lovely village of Porthtowan. It's a popular place with a beautiful beach, exhilirating cliff top paths and a series of mine stacks and engine houses dotting the landscape.
This 3 mile circular walk starts at the coastal car park and takes you along the South West Coast Path towards Chapel Porth which has a nice little beach. The path then heads through the Chapel Combe valley with views to the passing Great Wheal Charlotte Mine. At Towan Cross you pick up another path taking you through the countryside to the car park. You can extend the walk by following country lanes to Mount Hawke where there is a nice path along a stream.
To continue your walking in the area you could follow the South West Coast Path north to St Agnes Head. There's some lovely coastal heathland in this area and the fascinating Wheal Coates former tin mine. You can visit these locations on our St Agnes Head - St Agnes Beacon - Wheal Coates Walk. View Full Details>>
Portishead to Clevedon5 miles (8.5 km)Follow the coastal path from Portishead to Cleveland on this point to point walk in Somerset. There's pretty bays, nice beaches, sandstone cliffs and great views across the Severn Estuary into Wales. The route runs along a fairly flat path for about 5 miles.
The walk starts from the Portishead Lake where there is a nice park, lakeside cafe and car parking. Just to the north is Portishead Point lighthouse at Battery Point which is another good start point for the walk.
From the park you head south along the Mariner's Path to Black Nore lighthouse. The Grade II listed building was built in 1894 to guide shipping in the Severn Estuary as it made its way in and out of Bristol Harbour.
You continue past Redcliff Bay, Charlcombe Bay and Walton Bay where you reach the coastal golf course. The route continues past the 17th Century, Grade II listed Walton Castle and Ladye Bay before passing along the sea front in Clevedon and finishing at the pier. You can either return the same way or catch the bus back.
The walk uses part of the long distance Gordano Round trail. The figure of eight walk takes you on a tour of the coast, countryside, woodland and villages around Portishead. It's a great way to extend your walking in the area. View Full Details>>
Prawle Point2 miles (4 km)Visit this wonderful coastal headland on this exhilarating walk in South Devon. There's spectacular cliff tops, pretty beaches and great views along the coast. The spot is also significant as the southernmost point of Devon and a good place for wildlife watching. Look out for the rare cirl bunting and chestnut-sided warbler as you make your way through the area. There's also lots of pretty wildflowers and interesting plants, with orange tip, heath brown and red admiral butterflies fluttering around them.
The walk starts from the Prawle Point car park, about a mile south west of the village of East Prawle. From here it is a short walk to the Coastwatch Lookout at Prawle Point. Here you will find the Coastwatch visitor centre with a wealth of information about the area.
From the headland you can see various birds on the cliffs such as cormorants, razorbills, fulmars and little owls. There's also lots of pretty vegetation including tormentil, birds foot trefoil and autumn squill.
After rounding the headland you head north to Gammon Head and Pig's Nose where you turn inland. Other footpaths then take you back to the car park.
It's easy to extend your walk by picking up the South West Coast Path and heading north west towards East Portlemouth. Here you can catch a ferry over the estuary and visit Salcombe. There are nice walks here around the Salcombe and Kingsbridge Estuary and up to Bolt Head.
Heading east along the coast path will take you past Lannacombe Bay to Start Point where you can enjoy interesting tours at the lighthouse. View Full Details>>
Purbeck Way15 miles (24 km)This beautiful walk takes you from Wareham to Swanage giving splendid views of the Purbeck Hills and the Dorset coast. The route below uses the South West Cost path and the Purbeck Way to create a super circuit of the area.
The route starts with a lovely waterside stretch along the River Frome from Wareham. You then enter Stoborough Heath where you will pass the Blue Pool - a flooded, disused clay pit. Shortly after you arrive at the pretty village of Corfe Castle with its ruined 10th century castle of the same name. The path then leads you through Corfe Common and onto the stunning Dorset coast where you join the South West Coast Path. The coastal section then takes you past the beautiful Chapman's Pool, through Durlston Country Park to Swanage. From Swanage you continue to Ballard Down where you join the Purbeck Way, crossing the Purbeck Hills to return to Corfe Castle.
The video below left shows the splendid view as you cross the Purbeck Hills from Ballard Down to Corfe Castle. On your right you can see Poole Harbour and Bournemouth, while on your left is Swanage and the Purbeck Hills. On a clear day the Isle of Wight is also clearly visible. View Full Details>>
Raad ny Foillan - Isle of Man Coastal Path95 miles (153 km)Follow the Isle of Man Coast path along the beautiful Manx coast and enjoy some stunning coastal scenery. The 95 mile (153km) walk is waymarked with a White gull on blue sign. This is beacause in English the route is known as 'The Way of the Gull'. The island is wonderful for flora and fauna. Look out for grey seals and a variety of seabirds including  kittiwakes, Manx shearwaters, puffins and guillemots.
The walk starts in Douglas, the capital and largest town on the island. The first section heads south west to Castletown passing Santon Head and the lovely Langness peninsula. You'll also pass Dreswick Point the southernmost point of the main island of the Isle of Man.
From Castletown you continue west to Port St Mary and Spanish Head where there are views to the Calf of Man.
The route turns north to Port Erin where you will find the Isle of Man Railway Museum. From Port Erin you head to Peel climbing Bradda Hill and Cronk ny Arrey Laa where there are great cliff top views. You will also pass the magical Glen Maye with its picturesque waterfall and lush woodland trails. At Peel there are great views of St Patrick's Isle and the ruins of Peel Castle.
From Peel you head to Kirk Michael and Jurby before arriving at the Point of Ayr. Here you will find a 19th century lighthouse designed by Robert Stevenson, grandfather of the novelist Robert Louis Stevenson. It is situated at northernmost point of the Isle of Man. It's a particularly lovely section of the walk with sand dunes, gorse and heather to enjoy.
From Point of Ayr you turn south to Ramsey, the second largest town on the island. Here you will find a large harbour and an interesting derelict pier.
From Ramsey you head to the village of Maughold and to the nearby Maughold Head. It is the easternmost point of the island and the closest to England.
The next section takes you from Maughold to Laxey where you will find a pretty harbour, beach and promenade. Here you will also find the Snaefell Mountain Railway which you can catch to the summit of Snaefell, the highest mountain on the Isle of Man. The final leg then takes you back to Douglas via Clay Head and Onchan Head. View Full Details>>
Rame Head6 miles (9 km)This circular walk explores the beautiful Rame Peninsula on the Cornish Coast. It's a fantastic place for a walk with wonderful views across Cawsand Bay to Plymouth Sound and the city of Plymouth. There's some nice coastal woodland and a visit to the mediaevel Rame Chapel. It's a great place for wildlife spotting with lots of sea birds and Dartmoor Ponies to look out for. The entire area of the peninsula is designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
The walk starts from the car park at Kingsand and follows the South West Coast Path to Penlee Point, before heading to Rame Head and the mediaevel chapel. You then head north along the coast before crossing the peninsula to return to Kingsand. View Full Details>>
Red Wharf Bay8 miles (13 km)This walk uses part of the Anglesey Coast Path to explore this expansive sandy bay located on the east coast of Anglesey. The area is also an area of outstanding natural beauty with fabulous coastal views and some lovely countryside. There's also lots of pretty pools and eroded rock formations to look out for.
This walk starts at the car park at the village of Red Wharf Bay and picks up the coast path to take you around the bay. It's a good path which runs along the beach with the option of climbing into the forest around Mynydd Llwdyiarth.
National Cycle Network Route 5 runs through the village of Pentraeth which is just south of the bay. You can cycle to the village and then head along Lon y traeth to take you down to the bay.
To extend your walk you can continue along the coast path to the village of Benllech. This will take you through St David's Park.
If you continue east along the coast you will soon come to Penmon Point. Here you'll find the Trwyn Du Lighthouse and great views towards Puffin Island, Great Orme and Snowdon. There's also nice pebble beaches and seals and dolphins to look out for. View Full Details>>
Rempstone Ride12 miles (20 km)This is a lovely, largely traffic free cycle or walk across Rempstone Heath.
The route begins at Norden Station and soon enters the peaceful Rempstone Estate with its woodland, fields and heathland. On exiting the estate there are two alternative paths you can follow. The first heads towards the Sandbanks ferry with splendid views of Poole harbour. The other takes you to Studland with its fabulous beaches and attractive coastline. Either of these make good alternative starting points for the ride although the Sandbanks ferry will be more accessible for most.
Cyclists should use a mountain bike or hybrid as the off road tracks on Rempstone Heath are quite bumpy and sandy in places. Most of this route takes place on the traffic free Rempstone estate so is also suitable for walkers.
To further extend your walk you could explore the Studland Heath Nature Reserve with its dunes, heathland and variety of wildlife. You can also pick up the South West Coast Path at the Sandbanks Ferry and head to Old Harry Rocks and Swanage. View Full Details>>
Rhossili2 miles (4 km)This circular walk takes you around the Rhossili headland on the beautiful Gower Peninsula.
The walk start from the car park in the village of Rhossili. Here there is a National Trust shop in one of the former coastguard cottages. You then follow a good surfaced footpath along the headland with wonderful views of the beautiful Rhossili Bay and beach. You continue towards Kitchen Corner where there are splendid views of Worm's Head. This unusual promontory, is shaped like a giant sea-serpent and marks the most westerly tip of Gower. It is possible to walk to Worm's Head  but only when the tide is out so check tide times before if you intend to extend your walk here.
The route continues along the coast to Tears Point with views of the lovely Fall Bay. The final section takes you through the countryside back to the car park.
If you like to continue your walking in the area then you could climb to Rhossili Down for more great views. The Gower Way long distance walk also passes Rhossili so you could follow this waymarked path further along the coast.
Using the google street view link below you can virtually explore area! View Full Details>>
Ribble Estuary5 miles (8.5 km)Explore the most important river estuary in the UK on this coastal walk in Lytham St Annes. The Ribble Estuary attracts hundreds of thousands of birds each year. It's a special place with changing tides, lots of wildlife and nice views towards Southport and the Welsh Hills.
The walk starts from the RSPB Ribble Discovery Centre at Fairhaven Lake. The centre is a great place to learn about the birds that visit the lake and estuary. You can park at the lakeside car park or catch a train to the nearby Ansdell and Fairhaven train station.
The route then follows the lakeside path towards Granny's Bay before picking up the Lancashire Coastal Way to take you to Lytham. You can follow the nice surfaced footpath or take an alternative route through the sand dunes.
You continue along the promenade to Lytham where you can take a small detour to the pretty Lowther Gardens. Here you'll find attractive woodland, a rose garden and a pond with a statue and fountain.
After crossing the road to the sea front you continue to the iconic Lytham windmill. The mill was built at the beginning of the 19th century and is open to the public in the summer months. It contains a museum which explains the history and practice of flour milling. After leaving the mill you can enjoy a stroll along Lytham jetty. It's quite a long jetty and at low tide you can walk right to the end and enjoy an even better view of the birdlife in the estuary. Look out for herons, curlew, redshank, shellduck and dunlin. The walk then returns to the fairhaven lake car park the same way.
To extend your walking in this lovely area you can continue along the Lancashire Coastal Way in either direction. Heading east will take you along the River Ribble towards Warton and Freckleton. This section has nice views over the river and surrounding countryside with birds such as Lapwing and Little Egret to look out for. There's also lots of wildflowers in the summer which attract butterflies and other birds.
If you head west you will come to St Annes and Blackpool.
Also nearby is the delightful Lytham Hall. The old hall is surrounded by attractive woodland and parkland with nice footpaths to follow around the site. View Full Details>>
Ring of Brodgar2 miles (4 km)This walk visits a section of the fascinating Heart of Neolithic Orkney World heritage Site on Mainland island. The settlements are in a beautiful spot, next to the Loch of Stenness and surrounded by heather and wildlfowers.
The notable ring of stones stands on a small isthmus between the Lochs of Stenness and Harray. They are the northernmost circle henge in Britain and the third largest. It is thought to have been erected between 2500 BC and 2000 BC.
After exploring the site you can head south east for just over half a mile and visit the Standing Stones of Stenness. The stones may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles.  Based on radiocarbon dating, it is thought that work on the site had begun by 3100 BC.
Just next to the stones you will find Maeshowe. The Neolithic chambered cairn and passage grave dates from around 2800 BC. It's an impressive sight and one of the largest tombs in Orkney. The mound encasing the tomb is 115 feet (35 m) in diameter and rises to a height of 24 feet (7.3 m).
You can extend your walk by heading to Skara Brae and the Bay of Skaill.
You can virtually explore the area on the google street view link below! View Full Details>>
Ringstead Bay3 miles (5.5 km)This walk takes you along a particularly lovely section of the Jurassic coastline near Weymouth in Dorset.
The circular walk starts at Southdown at the good sized National Trust car park. It's also a terrific viewpoint with views over Weymouth Bay to Portland. A good footpath then takes you down to Burning Cliff where you pick up the South West Coast Path to White Nothe. The cliffs and views at White Nothe are particularly special. You can then return the same way or pick up the altrenative bridleway to take you back to the car park.
This stretch has some wonderful coastal scenery with bays, beaches and spectacular cliffs. There is also some lovely countryside to enjoy and the option of following a steep track down to the shingle beach.
You can extend your walk by continuing a few miles east and visiting the beautiful Lulworth Cove and Durdle Door. Another good option is to head west along the coast path an visit Osmington Mills and Osmington Bay. From here you can climb to the Osmington White Horse and enjoy more fabulous views of the area. View Full Details>>
Roseland Peninsula10 miles (16 km)Explore the beautiful Roseland Peninsula on this 10 mile walk on the Cornish coast. The walk starts from the village of Porscatho where there is a good sized car park by the coast. You could also start from nearby Gerrans where there is an interesting 13th century church.
From the Porscatho car park you head south along the South West Coast Path, passing a series of pretty coves and beaches including the Carricknath Point and Porthbean Beach SSSI. Here you will find sand covered beaches, natural rock platforms with fragments of saltmarsh, cliff top grassland, low rocky headlands and a variety of rare plants.
You continue south to Zone Point, at the southernmost extremity of the peninsula extending into Falmouth Bay. Near here you will find the National Trust owned St Anthony Head Lighthouse. The headland is one of the highlights of the peninsula overlooking the entrance to one of the world's largest natural harbours, Carrick Roads and the estuary of River Fal. The site also includes an old military fort with big guns, batteries and fortifications. Look out for wildlife including cormorants, shags and seals in this area.
The route continues past the pretty Little Molunan beach before turning north along St Mawes Harbour with nice views across to St Mawes Quay. This section includes some nice woodland trails with bluebells, primroses and celandines to see. Also look out for a wide variety of butterflies fluttering around the wildflowers.
The path then takes you along the Porth Creek with views down to the Percuil River and a stretch through farmland. The final section takes you back along the coast to Porscatho.
To continue your walking in the area you could head to the nearby town of Falmouth and visit the fascinating Pendennis Castle and the lovely Swanpool Nature Reserve. You can also enjoy a walk from St Mawes to St Just with a visit to the fascinating St Mawes Castle and the St Just in Roseland 13th-century church with beautiful riverside gardens. The ferry from St Mawes will take you across the Fal Estuary to Falmouth where you can continue along the South West Coast Path. View Full Details>>
Royal Victoria Country Park2 miles (4 km)Explore 200 acres of woodland, grassy parkland and coastline in this delightful coastal park located at Netley, near Southampton. The park features a number of delightful walking paths while National Cycle Network route 2 also passes through the park. You can take a ride on the miniature narrow-gauge railway which runs for around 1 mile through the park while there is also has a 150-ft viewing tower, giving views over the park, and across Southampton Water to Hythe and Southampton.
The park also hosts a rich variety of wildlife, with deer in the woodland and a number of coastal birds, including oyster catchers and brent geese.
The park is easily accessible with nearby train stations at Netley and Hamble. View Full Details>>
Rye Harbour2 miles (4 km)This lovely walk takes you around Rye Harbour Nature Reserve on the Sussex coast. There's great scenery with a wide range of habitats including saltmarsh, lagoons, grazing marsh, shingle and reedbeds. You can follow miles of footpaths through the reserve while looking out for a huge variety of wildlife.  Birds you might see include ringed plover, avocet, oystercatcher, redshank, lapwing, and sandwich terns. There's also lots of colourful plants and flowers in the summer months.  Look out for 456 species of flowering plants including yellow horned-poppy, sea pea and sea campion.
The reserve also includes Henry VIII's Camber Castle. You can visit the interesting ruins of this 16th century Device Fort, built to protect the Sussex coast against French attack.
The Saxon Shore Way long distance footpath runs through the reserve so you could pick this up to extend your walk. You could visit nearby Winchelsea and then follow the waterside path along the Royal Military Canal. Also nearby is the beautiful Camber Sands.
At Camber Sands you can pick up the England Coast Path and head east to the splendid Dungeness RSPB Nature Reserve. Here you will find lakes, lagoons and an expansive section of shingle beach with a wide variety of wildlife. View Full Details>>
Salcombe and Bolt Head Circular Walk5 miles (8.5 km)This coastal circular walk takes you from Salcombe to the coastal headland at Bolt Head. There's much to enjoy with pretty bays, exhilarating cliff tops and a peaceful woodland section through Tor Woods towards the end of the route.
The walk starts at the North Sands car park near to Salcombe Castle. The ruined castle is located on a rocky outcrop which is easily reached on foot at low tide. From here you pick up the South West Coast Path and follow it south through Collaton Wood to the beach at South Sands and Splatcove Point. Around here you will pass the Overbeck's Museum and Garden. The National Trust owned site includes a colourful subtropical garden, with exotic and rare plants surrounding the seaside home of scientist and inventor Otto Overbeck. There's great views over the estuary and coast from the gardens and an interesting museum with Overbeck's art and natural history collection together with a display of items relating to the maritime history of the area.
After passing Overbeck's the route then heads through Fir Wood before following the coast path to Sharp Tor with views over Starehole Bay. This is the area where the Herzogin Cecilie ship ran aground in 1936. A dark patch of seaweed marks the site of the wreck.
Shortly after Starehole Bay you come to Bolt Head where there are fabulous views along the coast. The area is great for wildlife with Dartmoor Ponies grazing on the cliffs. Also look out for birds including Fulmar, Shag, and Cormorants on the cliffs.
From Bolt Head you head north west along the coast path towards Middle Soar where you turn right and head inland. The path then turns right again towards Tor Woods. These pretty woods contain lots of woodland flowers including bluebells, ramsons, wood sorrel and celadines. Look out for wildlife including Sika Deer as you make your way through this lovely area.
After exiting the woods you arrive back at the coast where it is a short walk back to the car park.
To extend your walking in the area you can continue north west along the coast path to Bolberry Down. This National Trust owned area has good surfaced paths, lots of pretty wildflowers and more great views. Just beyond Bolberry Down you will find Bolt Tail, the sister headland of Bolt Head.
Just to the north east of the town you can explore the Salcombe and Kingsbridge Estuary and look out for dolphins, seals, basking sharks and a variety of wading birds.
You can also catch the ferry over the estuary to East Portlemouth and follow the coast path to Prawle Point, the southernmost point of Devon. View Full Details>>
Salcombe and Kingsbridge Estuary2 miles (3 km)Enjoy a walk along the beautiful Salcombe and Kingsbridge Estuary Nature Reserve on this walk in Devon.
Start your walk from the car park at Lincombe Cross just to the north east of Salcombe. From here you can pick up footpaths along the estuary to Tosnos Point and Snapes Point at the southern end. Reed beds, mudflats and eelgrass beds all help to support an abundance of wildlife on the estuary. Look out for dolphins, seals, basking sharks and a variety of wading birds as you make your way along the paths.
To continue your walking in the area you could try our Salcombe and Bolt Head Circular Walk which visits some lovely cliff tops and woodland near the town.
Heading north will take you to the town of Kingsbridge itself, where there are nice footpaths to follow from the town to the delightful Bowcombe Creek.
You can also catch the ferry over the estuary from Salcombe to East Portlemouth and follow the coast path to Prawle Point, the southernmost point of Devon. View Full Details>>
Saltburn Valley Gardens1 miles (2 km)This park overlooks the lovely coastline at Saltburn in Yorkshire. It contains beautiful formal gardens and woodland with fine views of the ocean. There is also a woodland centre, the Albert Memorial, Victorian Gardens and Italian gardens. View Full Details>>
Sand Point3 miles (5.5 km)Enjoy fine views across the Bristol Channel to Wales on this coastal walk on the edge of the Mendip Hills in Somerset. Sand Point is an extraordinary peninsula stretching out from Middle Hope over the Bristol Channel. The area is geologically significant with carboniferous limestone and unusual volcanic intrusions. It is also historically fascinating with bowl barrow and disc barrow dating from late Neolithic or Bronze Age and the site of a likely motte-and-bailey castle. It's also the site of Woodspring Priory, a former Augustinian priory, founded in the early 13th century. The area is managed by the National Trust and is a popular place for walkers with its wonderful views towards Flat Holm island, South Wales, Clevedon, the Second Severn Crossing and the Severn Bridge. There's also lots of wildlife to look out for with various coastal birds visiting the bays below. Keep your eyes peeled for curlews, little egrets, redshank and sandpipers as you make your way across the headland.
Sand Point is located just to the north of Weston-super-Mare, near the village of Kewstoke. You can start your walk from the Sand Point car park at the end of Beach Road, next to the lovely Sand Bay. Then follow the footpath east towards St Thomas Head, passing Woodspring Priory on the way. From here there's nice views down to Woodspring Bay and up the coast to Clevedon.
After taking in the views from St Thomas Head you turn west and head back towards Middle Hope. On the way you can descend to the pretty beach where you can look out for seals. Also look out for the fascinating volcanic rock formations known as pillow lavas, formed as molten lava cooled quickly as it flowed under the sea. 
The walk finishes by climbing towards Swallow Cliff where you reach a height of about 130ft, with great views over Sand Bay to enjoy. From the high point you descend back to the finish point at the car park.
To extend your walking in the area you could head south and visit Worlebury Hill where there are nice views over Weston-Super-Mare and woodland trails in the pretty Weston Woods.
In Weston-Super-Mare you can also pick up the West Mendip Way long distance trail and explore the Mendip Hills.
You could also visit the splendid Brean Down which is a similarly beautiful coastal promontory. View Full Details>>
Sandwood Bay7 miles (12 km)Visit one of the most beautiful beaches in Great Britain on this wonderful walk in Sutherland. The route follows a 4 mile track from Blairmore, passing a series of pretty lochs through peat moorland to the coast.
The walk starts at the car park in the little hamlet of Blairmore and soon picks up the trail to the coast. You'll first pass Loch Aisir, Loch na Gainimh and Loch a Mhuilinn before the wonderful stretch of coast comes into view. There's great views of the Cape Wrath cliffs and the lovely Sandwood Loch on this final section. The beach is absoultely stunning with sand dunes, cliffs and an unusual sea stack named Am Buachaille. It's about a mile long so you can enjoy a long stroll along the beach before heading back to Blairmore on the same path.
The Sandwood coast is a great place for wildlife spotting. Look out for dolphins and a variety of birds including Guillemots, Razor Bills and Shags. View Full Details>>
Saxon Shore Way160 miles (257 km)Explore Kent's ancient coastline as you visit Iron Age hill forts, cathedrals, Martello towers, historic ports and castles on this incredible 160 mile walk.
The route passes through two Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, numerous Sites of Special Scientific Interest and several Nature Reserves.
The walk begins on the Thames at Gravesend and heads through Faversham, Deal, Dover and Rye to the finish point at Hastings. View Full Details>>
Scarborough to Filey9 miles (14.5 km)This is a popular coastal walk between these two attractive North Yorkshire towns. It's a particularly beautiful stretch of coast with lovely bays, exhilarating cliff tops, gorgeous beaches and fascinating rock formations. The route is a 9 mile walk on good paths with some moderate climbs along the way. It follows the Cleveland Way National Trail for much of the way.
The walk starts by St Nicholas cliff in Scarborough and heads south past South Sands and South Bay to Wheatcroft Cliff. You'll also pass through South Cliff Gardens and Holbeck Gardens on this lovely opening section.
The route then heads along the golf course at Wheatcroft to Cornelian Bay before coming to one of the walk's major highlights at Cayton Bay. The area is managed by the National Trust and includes a beautiful surfing beach and a woodland section along Cayton Cliff.
The next section takes you past the interesting rock formations at Lebberston Cliff to the pretty Gristhorpe Sands. You then pass along Newbiggin cliff before coming to Filey Brigg. This striking rocky promontory is another major feature of this section of the coast path. It's a great place for looking out for the wide variety of sea birds which visit the area.
The final section takes you along Filey Sands to the town of Filey. It's a great place for refreshments with plenty of pubs and cafes to choose from.
Filey sits at the northern end of the Yorkshire Wolds Way so you could pick this up to extend your walk. You can follow it inland through the countryside to nearby Muston.
At the end of the route you will also find the lovely Filey Brigg Country Park. The park has super views over Filey Bay and the town below.
You can virtually explore this section of the Cleveland Way by using the google street view link below.
You can also extend your walking by following the Cleveland Way north and visiting Robin Hood's Bay and Whitby on the Whitby to Scarborough Walk. View Full Details>>
Seaford to Eastbourne13 miles (21 km)This is a popular coastal walk between these two East Sussex towns. It passes through many of the highlights of this beautiful area of the South Downs. This includes visits to Cuckmere River and Cuckmere Haven, Birling Gap, Seven Sisters Country Park, Friston Forest and Beachy Head. The route uses sections of the long distance Vanguard Way and South Downs Way to guide you along the coast. As such the footpaths are waymarked and generally in good condition.
It's about a 13 mile walk with the option of returning to Seaford on a splendid coastal bus ride from Eastbourne.
The walk starts in Seaford and heads east along the coast, passing the Martello Tower and the Seaford Head Nature Reserve. From here there are spectacular views of the Seven Sisters Cliffs and the Cuckmere Valley. It's also a great place for flora and fauna with nationally rare and significant species of plants, birds and insects.
The route then follows a riverside path north along the Cuckmere River. It's a very pretty area with species-rich chalk grassland and wildflowers in the summer months. Look out for wildlife which includes a variety of butterflies and wildfowl.
The route crosses the Exceat Bridge over the river to enter Seven Sisters Country Park. Here you will find 700 acres of parkland with lots of footpaths and cycling trails. You pick up the South Downs Way here and follow it south through the park to the coast. The next section takes you to Birling Gap where you can visit the National Trust owned Belle Tout lighthouse. It's a good place to stop for refreshments with a nice cafe and great views.
The next stage takes you from Birling Gap to Beachy Head. Here you will find the highest chalk sea cliff in Britain, rising to a height of 162 metres (531 ft) with fabulous views along the coast to West Sussex and Dungeness in Kent.
The final section descends into Eastbourne, passing along the beach before finishing at the pier.
For a longer, marathon length route try our Brighton to Eastbourne Walk. View Full Details>>
Seahouses to Bamburgh3 miles (5 km)Walk along the golden sands of the Northumberland coast, on this walk from Seahouses to the striking Bamburgh Castle. It's a lovely setting with the path running along the beach with the castle making a wonderful backdrop for the duration of the walk. There's also attractive sand dunes, pretty wildflowers and great views over to the nearby Farne Islands.
Starting from Seahouses Harbour it's about a 3 mile walk to the castle along the beach. It's a nice flat, easy walk with a short climb up to the Grade I listed castle. The castle is open to the public and well worth a visit if you have time. There's fine state rooms, an art gallery, a stable block and a 12th century keep which is the oldest surviving part of the castle.
To extend your walking in the area you can head south on the Seahouses to Beadnell Walk. The St Oswald's Way long distance trail also passes through the area. You could follow it north and visit the Lindisfarne National Nature Reserve. Here you can look out for grey seals and birds including pale-bellied brent goose, wigeon, teal, pintail, merlin, dunlin, bar-tailed godwit. View Full Details>>
Seahouses to Beadnell3 miles (5 km)This popular walk runs between this two lovely villages in the Northumberland Coast AONB. It's about a 3 mile coastal trail so 6 miles there and back. The route takes place on a fairly flat section of the St Oswald's Way long distance trail. There's pretty harbours, lovely beaches and lots of wildlife to look out for on the way.
Seahouses is a working fishing port, which also serves the tourist trade, being the embarkation point for visits to the Farne Islands.
The route starts at Seahouses Harbour and heads towards North Sunderland Point. You continue south towards the golf course, the pretty Annstead Burn and Annstead Beach. The route passes alongside the lovely beach where you will find attractive sand dunes and wildlflowers such as Dog Rose and Marram Grass.
You soon come to Beadnell, passing the village, before finishing at the harbour where you can enjoy great views across Beadnell Bay.
To extend the route you can continue on the Beadnell to Low Newton Walk. This includes a visit to the National Trust owned Newton Pool Nature Reserve.
Head north along the St Oswalds Way and you can visit the dramatic Bamburgh Castle on the Seahouses to Bamburgh Walk. View Full Details>>
Sefton Coastal Footpath21 miles (34 km)This wonderful walk takes you from Crosby to Southport along the beautiful Sefton coastline.
The walk starts at Waterloo station in Crosby and heads to the coast via Crosby Marine Lake. You then head north to Hightown through the Dunes, passing the fascinating Another Place Sculptures on Crosby Beach. The next section takes you to Formby where you will enter the captivating Ainsdale National Nature Reserve. This is a well known spot for spotting the Natterjack Toad in the fabulous scenery of dunes, pinewoods and golden sand. Also look out for Red Squirrels, sand lizards and great-crested newts on this fantastic section of the walk.
The final section of the walk takes you past Royal Birkdale Golf course (home of the Open) and onto the lovely seaside town of Southport with its magnificent pier. The path comes to end shortly after at Crossens. View Full Details>>
Selsey Bill2 miles (3 km)This walk visits the southernmost point of Sussex in the town of Selsey. You can park at the East Beach car park to start your walk. From there it's a nice 1 mile walk along the pretty beach to Selsey Bill. After your walk you can enjoy refreshments in one of the cafes. The area is also well known for its excellent fresh fish huts.
The walk can be extended by visiting the nearby Pagham Harbour. It's located just to the north of Selsey and includes a fantastic nature reserve with thousands of wading birds.
If you head north west from the headland you can visit East and West Wittering with views of Bracklesham Bay. Here you can enjoy a walk through the sand dunes at East Head and pick up the long distance New Lipchis Way to take you into Chichester. You can also enjoy more nice walking trails around Chichester Harbour and Thorney Island. View Full Details>>
Sharkham Point Nature Reserve1 miles (1.5 km)Enjoy a short circular walk around this delightful coastal nature reserve in Brixham, Devon.
The reserve has a good sized parking area at the end of St Mary's Road in Higher Brixham. From here you can pick up the footpaths to take you to Sharkham Point and along the coastal headland. It's a great viewpoint with nice views down to St Mary's beach and along the coast. The area is fantastic for wildlife watching with ospreys in the skies above and dolphins in the beautiful turquoise waters below.
To extend your walk follow the South West Coast Path north around St Mary's Bay to the splendid Berry Head Country Park. Here you can see a wide variety of coastal plantlife and a large Guillemot colony. View Full Details>>
Skara Brae and the Bay of Skaill1 miles (2 km)Visit this fascinating Neolithic settlement located on Mainland in the Orkney Islands. The settlement is located on the beautiful Bay of Skaill and is designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Skara Brae dates from 3180 BCE–2500 BCE and consists of eight clustered houses with stone bed enclosures, dressers and seats. The site is superbly preserved and referred to as the Scottish Pompeii. There are good facilities with a visitor centre and cafe.
The walk also takes in some wonderful coastinline. You could continue your walk along the coast towards Yesnaby and Neban Point.
Another must see site is the Ring of Brodgar. The notable ring of stones stands on a small isthmus between the Lochs of Stenness and Harray. It also includes the Standing Stones of Stenness and Maeshowe burial chamber. View Full Details>>
Solent Way60 miles (96 km)Follow the Solent Way along the beautiful south coast from Milford on Sea to Emsworth.
The route starts off at Milford on Sea and heads along the coastal marshes to Lymington with splendid views of the Isle of Wight. This section runs through the beautiful Keyhaven Marshes where you can look out for a wide variety of birdlife. You then head inland through the New Forest towards Hythe passing the excellent Beaulieu Motor Museum, the pretty Dibden Inclosure and the Beaulieu River as you go. At Hythe you cross Southampton water on the Hythe Ferry taking you to Southampton where you follow the coast to Gosport. On this section you will pass the delightful Titchfield Haven nature reserve near Fareham. Here you will find 369 acres of River, fen, pools, reedbed and meadow with a variety of wildlife to look out for.
From Gosport a ferry ride takes you over the River Hamble to Portsmouth with its fascinating maritime history. The final stretch leads you around the attractive Langstone Harbour to the finish at Emsworth Key.
This is a fantastic walk with much to enjoy including beaches, promenades and marshes with an abundance of interesting wildlife. There is also a strong historical aspect with forts, museums and ships to explore particularly around Portsmouth. View Full Details>>
Solva Harbour2 miles (3 km)Enjoy a walk around the beautiful Solva Harbour on the Pembrokeshire Coast. There are good walking trails on the east and west side of the harbour with the rocky headland of the Gribin giving wonderful views of the coast and St Bride's Bay. There are also great views of the River Solva and of the pretty Solva beach.
This walk starts from the car park and follows good footpaths to the Gribin on the eastern side of the harbour. At the Gribin summit you will find an Iron Age fort and really wonderful views of the harbour and the coast. You can descend to the pebble beach at Gwadn where you may see breeding chough. After returning to the village you could stop for refreshments at the lovely Harbour Inn which has outdoor tables overlooking the river. The walk then continues along the western side of the harbour where there is more lovely scenery.
If you would like to continue your walk you could pick up the Pembrokeshire Coast Path and head west towards St David's or east towards Newgale. View Full Details>>
Solway Coast23 miles (37 km)This long walk makes use of the Cumbria Coastal Way and the Hadrian's Wall Path to explore the Solway Coast AONB. The route runs from Silloth to Bowness-on-Solway taking you through some beautiful scenery using a series of waymarked paths. In Silloth you can visit the Solway Coast Discovery Centre to learn all about the area before you begin your exercise.
The walk starts in Silloth next to the docks and heads north along the coast path to Skinburness and Grune Point. It's a lovely stretch of coast with the long spit of land sticking out into the beautiful Moricambe estuary. The extensive saltmarsh and mudflats attract a huge variety of wading birds so bring your binoculars!
After rounding Grune Point the path heads east across Skinburness Marsh and Calvo Marsh to Abbery Town. Here you turn north towards Newton Arlosh and Kirkbride, where you cross the River Wampool on Whitrigg Bridge.
The route then passes through the pretty Drumburgh Moss Nature Reserve, a site of international importance, dominated by an expanse of lowland raised mire. Look out for Curlew and red deer on this section of the walk.
The final section of the walk is particularly lovely, taking you along the coast from Glasson to Port Carlise and Bowness-on-Solway. There's wonderful views across the Channel of the River Eden towards Annan in Scotland.
To continue your walking in the AONB you can follow the Cumbria Coastal way east from Drumburgh. It will take you to Burgh By Sands before finishing near Gretna, on the Scottish Border. You could also follow it all the way into Carlise along the River Eden. View Full Details>>
Souter Lighthouse and Whitburn Coastal Park5 miles (8.5 km)Enjoy a coastal walk around the Souter Lighthouse, Whitburn Coastal Park and Lizard Point on the South Shields coast. The park and lighthouse are located just to the south of South Shields at the village of Marsden. You can park at the Souter Lighthouse car park off the A183 at Marsden Quarry to start your walk. Alternatively follow the traffic free cycle and walking path along National Cycle Route 1 from South Shields to the site. It's a nice trail passing Frenchman's Bay, Marsden Bay and the Leas. The park is also just a few miles north of Sunderland and can be reached by walking or cycling along the same National route.
This route starts at the lighthouse car park and heads to the coastal viewpoint at Lizard Point. You then head west along the coast to Marsden Cliff and the Leas. Here you will find two and a half miles of magnesian limestone cliffs, wave-cut foreshore and coastal grassland. It's a fine cliff top walk with great views along the coast.
After exploring the Leas the route turns round and returns to Whitburn Coastal Park. The park is a nature reserve with trees, a bird observatory, viewing screens and wetland habitats. There's also a new National Trust wildlife garden with ponds, wildflowers, trees, berry bearing shrubs, a bog garden and hibernation areas.
The reserve is great for wildlife watching with cormorants, shags, kittiwakes, fulmar and herring gulls.
At the end of your walk you can enjoy refreshments at the National Trust cafe.
The long distance Great North Forest Heritage Trail runs through Marsden so you can pick this up to extend your walk. It will take you inland towards Cleadon Park and Boldon.
You could also head south along the traffic free cycle path to Whitburn Bay and Sunderland. View Full Details>>
South Dorset Ridgeway17 miles (27 km)Enjoy wonderful views of the Jurassic Coast on this walk along the South Dorset Ridgeway. The route runs along the South West Coast Path from West Bexington to Osmington Mills with some beautiful scenery to enjoy. The area is also historically significant with several Bronze Age round barrows and Iron Age hill forts to look out for on the way. The immediate area contains about 500 archaeological monuments, nearly all of them several thousand years old. It's quite a challenging walk with several climbs, reaching a maximum height of nearly 800ft. From the elevated position of the path there are splendid coastal views to enjoy for most of the route.
The walk starts in the village of West Bexington on the Dorset coast near Chesil Beach. You then climb away from the coast to the Hardy Monument, passing Abbotsbury Castle Iron Age Hill Fort and the Hell Stone neolithic dolmen on Portesham Hill. The Hardy monument was built in 1844 in memory of Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy, Flag Captain of HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar. It sits on Black Down and commands fine views to the coast.
The path continues east, descending towards the village of Bincombe across Bincombe Down. Soon after you come to Chalbury Hill Fort and the Osmington White Horse. The distinctive figure is one of the highlights of the walk. It dates from the early 19th century and represents King George III riding his horse.
From the white horse you descend to the village of Osmington. It's an interesting place with a church dating from the 12th century and dwellings dating back to the 16th century. The final section of the walk takes you from Osmington to the little hamlet of Osmington Mills on the coast. There's nice views of Osmington Bay as you finish your walk.
If you wanted to extend your walk you could continue east along the coast and visit the beautiful Ringstead Bay. View Full Details>>
South Downs Circular Walk8 miles (12.5 km)This terrific 8 mile circular walk visits some of the major highlights of the East Sussex area of the South Downs National Park. You'll take in Birling Gap, Seven Sisters Country Park, Friston Forest and the Cuckmere River and Cuckmere Haven. There's wonderful coastal views, riverside paths, woodland trails and some moderate climbs to enjoy on this varied route which is one of the best circular walks on the South Downs.
The walk starts from the Birling Gap car park. This National Trust owned area has great facilities and includes the splendid Belle Tout lighthouse. From the car park you head west along the The South Downs Way National Trail. This section of the trail runs along the coast to Cuckmere Haven. This area has a nice shingle beach with wonderful views of the Seven Sisters Cliffs. There's also riverside trails along the Cuckmere River and a wide variety of flora and fauna to look out for.
The route then heads north through the Seven Sisters Country Park. Here you'll find 700 acres of parkland with lots of great cycling and walking trails.
The walk then turns east through Friston Forest, where there are miles of shady woodland trails. You can look out for rare butterflies and deer as you make your way through the forest.
After leaving the forest you turn south, passing through countryside around East Dean, before returning to the car park on the coast.
To extend your exercise you could head east along the South Downs Way and visit Beachy Head, the highest chalk sea cliff in Britain. View Full Details>>
South Foreland Lighthouse2 miles (3 km)This walk climbs to the Victorian South Foreland Lighthouse on the White Cliffs above St Margaret's. It's about a one mile walk from the town up to the lighthouse with great coastal views and a visit to the lovely Pines Garden on the way.
The route starts at the public car park at St Margaret's Bay and follows a section of the South West Coast Path up to South Foreland. On the way you will pass the coastguard office on Bay Hill before following St Margaret's Road and Beach Road to the Pines Garden. The Gardens are well worth exploring with a waterfall and adjoining lake, a grass labyrinth and an organic kitchen garden with around 40 different species of fruit and vegetables. The site also includes the St. Margaret's Museum. The museum features changing displays about local history including St Margaret's during WW2, and one-time resident Noel Coward.
After leaving the Pines the path continues past the Grade II listed St Margaret's Windmill before coming to the lighthouse. The lighthouse was the first to display an electric light anywhere in the world. You can climb to the top of the structure and enjoy great views over to France. There's also a nice National Trust tea room for refreshments after your climb.
An alternative route is to park at the White Cliffs visitor centre and follow the White Cliffs Country Trails along the coast to the lighthouse. It's a slightly longer walk at 2 miles.
If you wish to extend your walk from the lighthouse you can continue west along the coast path and visit Dover Castle. View Full Details>>
South of the Landsker Trail62 miles (100 km)This circular walk explores the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park around Pembroke. The walk begins at Narberth and includes a fantastic coastal section through Tenby, Saundersfoot, Manorbier and the beautiful Stackpole Estate. The estate consists of 12 square kilometres of farmland, lakes, woodland, beaches, and cliffs including the spectacular Stackpole Quay. The video below shows the coastal section from Freshwater East to Stackpole
The route then heads inland where you can enjoy riverside sections along the River Creswell and the River Cleddau. You will also pass Carew Castle on the River Carew and the charming Landshipping Quay before returning to Narberth. View Full Details>>
South Stack Lighthouse1 miles (1 km)Visit this spectacularly positioned lighthouse and the wonderful South Stack Cliffs RSPB nature reserve on this walk in Anglesey.
The walk starts from the car park a short distance from the lighthouse. You then descend 400 steps on to the island. It's a short but wonderful path with craggy cliffs and wonderful coastal views to enjoy as you descend. On a clear day you can see to the Isle of Man and the mountains of Ireland.
After climbing back up the steps you can explore the South Stack Cliffs nature reserve on more splendid coastal paths. The reserve consists of heathland with wildflowers and an abundance of wildlife. Look out for coastal birds including Chough, Guillemot and Puffins. You may also see porpoises in the water below.
Please note that although this is a short walk the climb back up the steps is quite challenging so you need to be in reasonable shape!
To extend your walk you can easily pick up the Anglesey Coast Path and follow it along South Stack Road to Penrhosfeilw. In the other direction you will find Holyhead Mountain and Breakwater Country Park. Here you can enjoy a nature trail and wonderful views of the Irish Sea and the Skerries.
The google street view link below will give you a great panoramic view of the area from the car park. View Full Details>>
Southend Millennium Walk24 miles (39 km)Enjoy the coastline and surrounding countryside of this famous seaside resort on this interesting circular walk.
You will enjoy beaches, the famous Golden Mile with its numerous tourist attractions and the longest pier in the world on the coastal stretch which starts at Southend Tourist Information Centre. The path also visits Hadleigh Country Park and the ruins of Hadleigh Castle before heading inland through the attractive Essex Countryside passing through Rochford on the way. You then return to the coast for another pleasant coastal stretch through Thorpe Bay before finishing back at the Tourist information centre in Southend. View Full Details>>
Spurn Point8 miles (13 km)This walk explores the splendid Spurn Point National Nature Reserve on the tip of the coast of the East Riding of Yorkshire. The narrow sand spit stretches for over 3 miles into the the Humber estuary. It's a special place, perfect for a coastal walk or cycle with dramatic scenery and huge variety of wildlife. There's much to enjoy with pretty beaches, sand-dunes, marshland and the striking effects of the changing tides.
You can park at the car park at Kilnsea to start your walk/ride. Then head south passing the Spurn Bird Observatory and Kilnsea Warren, with fine views across Kilnsea Clays. You continue along the peninsula to Spurn Head at the tip of the reserve. Here you will find the RNLI lifeboat station and two disused lighthouses.
As you make your way through the reserve look out for a large variety of birdlife. This includes rare birds such as the cliff swallow from North America, a lanceolated warbler from Siberia and a black-browed albatross from the Southern Ocean.  More common birds include wheatears, whinchats, common redstarts and flycatchers. Several thousand birds can be seen in and around the reserve on a good day. You may also spot common seals and grey seals feeding and interacting in the month of September. It's a wonderful sight as the seals come right up to the coast so you can spot them without the need for binoculars.
NB please check tide times before visiting the reserve as it is dangerous to walk to the end of the spit at high tide.
To continue your exercise in the Hull area you could visit Humber Bridge Country Park and enjoy great views over the River Humber.
The Trans Pennine Trail also runs through Hull so you could pick up the trail and enjoy a waterside walk along the Humber to Hessle.
If you head up the coast to Hornsea you can enjoy a walk along the pretty Hornsea Mere which is another great place for birdwatching. View Full Details>>
St Agnes Head - St Agnes Beacon - Wheal Coates4 miles (6 km)This circular walk visits St Agnes Head before climbing St Agnes Beacon and visiting the fascinating Wheal Coates tin mine on the Cornish coast. It's a beautiful area with yellow gorse and purple heather prominent features in the late summer months. The area also has a fascinating mining history with atmospheric coastal ruins dating from the early 19th century. It is often referred to as Poldark country because of the associations with the historical novels by Winston Graham and the television series starring Aidan Turner.
There's a car park on the headland where you can start your walk. After exploring the headland the route then climbs inland to St Agnes Beacon. The hill stands at a height of 189m (620 ft), commanding fabulous views over the surrounding coast and countryside. After descending the beacon the route then heads to the Wheal Coates tin mine. The mine is one of the highlights of the area with dramatic ruins overlooking a beautiful coastline. It was opened in 1802 and closed in 1889 when the price of tin fell.
The route then heads along the coast to visit Chapel Porth where there is a lovely beach. From here you follow the coast path back to the St Agnes Head car park.
To extend your walk you can head south and visit the Chapel Combe valley and the popular village of Porthtowan. Heading north east along the South West Coast Path will take you to Perranporth. View Full Details>>
St Bees Head6 miles (9 km)Enjoy a coastal walk on this beautiful headland near Whitehaven. The walk along the cliff top path from St Bees is an exhilarating experience with fabulous views of the Isle of Man and the Cumbrian mountains and coast. The area is also an RSPB Nature Reserve with the largest seabird colony in north-west England.  These include Guillemots, kittiwakes, fulmars and razorbills. You may also see dolphins and porpoises.
The walk starts near the village of St Bees at the coastal car park. You then head north to Fleswick Bay where you will find a nice shingle beach surrounded by high sandstone cliffs. You continue to North Head, the most westerly point of Northern England. Here you will pass St Bees Lighthouse with views towards Saltom Bay and Whitehaven. 
The Cumbria Way passes St Bees Head so you could extend your walk by following the path to nearby Whitehaven. It is also the start point for the Wainwright's Coast to Coast Walk where you can head into the Lake District. View Full Details>>
St Catherine's Lighthouse2 miles (4 km)Visit the most southerly point on the Isle of Wight on this circular walk around St Catherine's Point and St Catherine's Down. It's a particularly lovely part of the island with steep cliffs, attractive woodland, grassland with wildflowers and stunning coastal views.
The walk start from the Niton undercliff car park and follows footpaths down to St Catherine's Point via Knowles Farm. In 1901 Guglielmo Marconi, the inventor of the radiotelegraph system, succeeded in transmitting radio signals from Knowles Farm to the Lizard Radio Telegraph Station 186 miles away in Cornwall. The route continues around the impressive 19th century lighthouse, passing along the cliff towards Reeth Bay. Here you climb back to Knowles Farm and the car park passing the 16th century Buddle Inn. It's a charming Oldy Worlde Pub with outdoor seating and great views. It's roughly the half way point on the walk so an ideal place for refreshments!
If you'd like to extend your walk you could pick up the Isle of Wight Coast Path and follow it to the nearby Ventnor Downs. You can visit the lighthouse by bike by following Regional Cycle Route 67 otherwise known as the 'Round the Island' route. View Full Details>>
St David's Head3 miles (5.5 km)Widely considered to be the most spectacular coastal headland on the Pembrokeshire Coast, this stunning area is a must see when visiting the National Park. This circular walk makes use of the Pembrokeshire Coast Path and other public footpaths to take you on a tour of the St David's Peninsula. You'll enjoy great views over the beautiful Whitesands Bay towards the nearby Ramsey Island.
The area is also geologically fascinating. You will pass Carn Llidi, a huge jagged tor, towering above the coast. You can climb the tor for stunning views to the east. The route also passes the Neolithic burial chamber of Coetan Arthur which dates from about 4000BC. View Full Details>>
St Govan's Chapel4 miles (6 km)This fascinating 13th century chapel is situated by the side of a spectacular limestone cliff on the Pembrokeshire Coast. This circular walk takes you from the delightful village of Bosherton to the coastal chapel, passing through the beautiful Stackpole Estate on the way.
The walk starts in Bosherton with it's fine pub, pretty cottages and 13th century Norman church. You then follow a nice country lane through the countryside to the coast where you can climb down the 52 stone steps to the little chapel. There's a doorway into the chapel on the north side, where you will find low stone benches and an empty bell-cote in a single chamber. The view out of the window towards the sea is wonderful.
After leaving the chapel and climbing back up the steps you continue to St Govan's Head for more great coastal views. Look out for a variety of seabirds, including guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes.
The next section takes you from St Govan's Head to the sand dunes at Broad Haven. You then pass along the lovely Stackpole Lily Ponds where you can look out for waterlilies in the summer and wildlife which includes the resident otters. The final waterside section along the ponds leads you back into Bosherton. View Full Details>>
St Illtyd's Walk60 miles (96 km)A religous walk from Pembrey Country Park (Carmarthenshire) to Margam Country Park (Neath). The path runs through Hendry, Pontardawe and Bryn. You will visit Penlle'r Castell ruin on the summit of Mynydd y Betws (with fabulous views), the spectacular Melincourt Falls on the Neath River and the Vale of Neath. There are also splendid views of the Black Mountains and peaceful wooded sections near Abercregan. The two splendid country parks at either end of the walk are also real highlights on this challenging walk.
The walk is waymarked with a white and yellow disc. View Full Details>>
St Ives to Zennor12 miles (19 km)This is a popular walk from St Ives to Zennor along the South West Coast Path. It's about a 6 mile walk along the coast path with the option of returning through the countryside. It then becomes a lovely 12 mile circular walk. Most of the path is pretty good but there is some climbing and scrambling required on some sections of the path. There's wonderful coastal scenery with dramatic cliffs rising hundreds of feet above the sea, beautiful beaches and delightful coves.
You start at St Ives head and then head west passing Porthmeor beach and the Tate Gallery. You then head to Zennor Head passing Hor Point, Pen Enys Point, Carn Naun Point and Gala Rocks. There are also views over to the Carracks, home to a colony of Grey Atlantic Seals. Boat trips to the island are available from St Ives.
When you reach Zennor head you turn away from the coast towards the little village. Here you will find the Church of Saint Senara which dates from the Norman period and the 13th and 15th centuries.
The return leg takes you from Zennor back to St Ives via some beautiful countryside. You'll pass Tremedda and Trevalgan before passing through the outskirts of the town and returning to St Ives Head.
To extend your walk you can follow the coast path to the lovely Carbis Bay. View Full Details>>
St Mawes to St Just2 miles (4 km)This walk takes you along a lovely stretch of coast on the Roseland Peninsula in Cornwall. It's about a 2.5 mile walk from the town of St Mawes to the village of St Just, with splendid views over Carrick Roads.
The walk starts from St Mawes Castle. The artillery fort was constructed by Henry VIII between 1540 and 1542. It's an impressive sight with grounds stretching down to the waters of the Fal Estuary and great views across to Pendennis Castle in Falmouth. After exploring the castle you follow the coast path north to St Just in Roseland. The little village is well know for its 13th-century church and beautiful riverside gardens.
To extend your walking in the area you can visit St Anthony Head Lighthouse and enjoy lovely views back towards St Mawes. Also nearby is the popular town of Falmouth where you can enjoy another great coastal walk to Pendennis Castle and the lovely Swanpool Nature Reserve. You can catch a regular ferry from St Mawes to Falmouth in the summer months. The long distance South West Coast Path also runs through the area. View Full Details>>
Start Point Devon2 miles (3.5 km)This is a popular circular walk around this beautiful headland on the South Devon coast. It's about a 2 mile walk with great views over Start Bay, a visit to the lighthouse and the option of descending to a delightful secluded beach.
The area is also great for wildlife watching. Look out for marine wildlife such as seals and dolphins, and birds including black-throated divers, gannets, kittiwakes and auks.
Begin the walk from the Start Point car park, near Start Farm. From here it is a short walk along the coast path to the lighthouse. On some days you can enjoy a guided tour here and climb the tower to hear stories about storms, shipwrecks and lighthouse living .
After exploring the lighthouse the walk heads along the coast path to Great Mattiscombe Sand. It is a steep climb down to the beautiful sandy cove where you can look out for Grey seals and basking sharks in the summer. The walk then heads north back to the car park.
It's easy to extend your walk if you have time. You can head west along the South West Coast Path and visit Prawle Point, the southernmost point of Devon. Heading a few miles north will take you to the splendid Slapton Ley Nature Reserve. Here you'll find the largest natural freshwater lake in South West England, a lovely shingle beach and great birdwatching opportunites. View Full Details>>
Stepper Point6 miles (10 km)This circular walk on the Cornish coast visits Stepper Point near Padstow. It's a lovely section of the South West Coast Path passing around the headland with great sea views, attractive countryside with lots of flora and fauna, interesting rock formations and nice sandy beaches.
This walk starts at the car park at Trevone Bay but you can just as easily start from Padstow. Trevone Bay has a popular beach, a good cafe and car park so is a nice place to start your hike to Stepper Point. You can pick up the coastal path north, running past Gunver Head and Longcarrow Cove to Stepper Point. Here you will pass the Daymark Tower which dates from the 19th century. It was used as a navigational aid, designed to guide sailors into the River Camel.
The route then turns south towards Padstow with great views over the Doom Bar at the mouth of the Camel Estuary. You continue along the estuary to St Saviour's Point before coming to Padstow where you can enjoy a stroll through the town and stop for refreshments. You could also visit Prideaux Place where you can enjoy a walk through the attractive grounds and deer park surrounding the 16th century house.
The final section of the walk takes you through the countryside around Trethilick before returning to Trevone Bay.
To extend your walking in the area you can pick up the Camel Trail or Saints Way which both pass Padstow. Continuing west along the South West Coast Path will take you towards Harlyn, Mother Ivy's Bay and Trevose Head. View Full Details>>
Strumble Head2 miles (3 km)This circular walk takes you to this wonderful rocky headland on the Pembrokeshire coast. Strumble Head is a great place for wildlife watching with porpoises and seals regular visitors to the seas below. It's a lovely area with the well known Strumble Head Lighthouse and a beautiful coastline with views towards Dinas Head and Cardigan Bay.
This walk starts off at the Strumble Head car park and takes you along the Pembrokeshire Coast Path to Porthsychan before returning through the countryside on a country lane. The final stretch back to the car park has great views of the lighthouse for most of the way.
If you'd like to extend your walk you could head south along the Pembrokeshire Coast Path to the rocky volcanic outcrop Garn Fawr where you will find an Iron Age Hillfort and spectacular views of the surrounding area. View Full Details>>
Suffolk Coast Path52 miles (83 km)A walk along the beautiful Suffolk coast from Felixstowe to Lowestoft. The walk passes through the Suffolk Coast and Heaths Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty which covers 150 square miles in East Anglia and includes wildlife-rich wetlands, ancient heaths, shingle beaches and historic towns and villages. You will pass through Bawdsey, Snape Maltings, Aldeburgh, North Warren, Thorpeness, Minsmere, Dunwich Forest, Southwold and Kessingland.
Highlights on the route include the section around Leiston where you will pass the delightful Minsmere Nature Reserve - one of the UK's premier birdwatching sites. This section also takes you through the peaceful Dunwich Forest, the Walberswick Nature Reserve and the lovely National Trust owned Dunwich Heath. There's miles of footpaths through beautiful purple heathland and coastal views along the pretty Dunwich beach on this section. View Full Details>>
Sunderland Point3 miles (5.5 km)Visit this lovely peninsula in Lancashire and enjoy great views across the River Lune and Morecambe Bay. Sunderland Point is located near Heysham and Lancaster. It's a great place for a walk with coastal views, salt marsh, beach, mud flats, farmland and lots of wildlife to look out for. These include birds such as Curlew, Heron and Peewit.
You can park at Potts Corner at Alderley Bank to being the walk. Footpaths then take you along the coast to the village of Sunderland Point where you'll pass a series of attractive Georgian houses by the quay. The area is also home to Sambo's grave. The master of a slave or servant called Sambo left him at Sunderland Point in the 18th century where he subsequently died in the brewery. The grave is a tourist attraction decorated with flowers or stones painted by local children.
To continue your walking in the area you could visit Morecambe Bay or try the Lune Estuary Footpath. View Full Details>>
Sussex Border Path137 miles (220 km)A fabulous long distance walk following the Sussex county border from Thorney Island in West Sussex to Rye in East Sussex.
You begin on Thorney Island with a lovely section along the coast from Emsworth. The route then heads through the South Downs to South Harting and Liphook before continuing to Gospel Green, Rudgwick, Gatwick Airport, Horley and East Grinstead. You then head through the beautiful High Weald, passing Groombridge, Bewl Water and Northiam before finishing in Rye. The walk is well waymarked throughout.
Route highlights include a climb to the highest point on the South Downs at Black Down in West Sussex. You'll also visit the lovely Weir Wood Reservoir and the interesting Bodiam Castle. View Full Details>>
Swanage to Corfe Castle via Ballard Down and Nine Barrow Down8 miles (13 km)Walk from the coastal seaside resort of Swanage to the village of Corfe Castle on this splendid hill top route in Dorset. This is a popular walk of about 8.5 miles which can be done in a day. It crosses the two well known local hills of Ballard Down and Nine Barrow Down with fabulous panoramic views to enjoy. Busses run regularly between Swanage and Corfe Castle so you can do the walk and then get the bus back. You could also return via the Swanage steam railway.
The walk starts on the front in Swanage close to the town centre. You then follow a section of the South West Coast Path up to Ballard Point. You then follow the Purbeck Way west to Studland Hill and Ballard Down. From the elevated position on the down there are splendid views of Old Harry Rocks, Studland, Poole Harbour, the Isle of Wight and Swanage. In the summer there are lots of wildflowers with the Adonis Blue butterfly to look out for. The area is also popular with mountain bikers as the grassy hills are great to ride down.
After climbing across the down you descend towards Ulwell before climbing towards Godslington Hill and Nine Barrow Down. The down reaches a height of 199 m (653 ft) with fabulous views towards Corfe Castle.
The final section is a lovely descent into Corfe Castle, passing Brenscombe Hill, Rollington Hill and Challow Hill. Here you can enjoy refreshments and explore the fascinating ruins of the 11th century castle. View Full Details>>
Swyre Head2 miles (2.5 km)Visit the highest point of the Purbeck Hills on this coastal walk in Dorset. On a clear day the views are simply breathtaking in all directions.
There is a car park at the end of West Street about a mile south west of the village of Kingston. This short route to the summit starts from here but you could also start from the village if you prefer. If you're coming by public transport then starting from Corfe Castle is a good option. All these start points make use of a section of the The Hardy Way to take you to the hill summit. It's a great spot standing at an elevation of 208 m (682 ft) and commanding views as far as Dartmoor and the Isle of Portland near Weymouth. The Isle of Wight, Lulworth Cove, Poole Harbour and much of the Purbeck Hills are also visible on a clear day. If you feel like extending your walk you can continue along the Hardy Way to Kimmeridge Bay where there are rock pools with a variety of marine wildlife. Here there is also a nice circular walk to Chapmans Pool to try.
The little village of Kingston is also worth visiting with its Victorian Grade I listed church and 18th century village pub. Beyond that the trail heads to Corfe Common and Corfe Castle. View Full Details>>
Teignmouth and Dawlish Way17 miles (27 km)These two lovely coastal towns are connected by this popular walk devised by Teignmouth and Dawlish Ramblers. The walk begins at Teignmouth pier and heads inland through some beautiful countryside and pretty villages before heading back to the coast at Dawlish. The last section returns you to Teignmouth via Holcombe.
To extend your walking in the area you can pick up the Dawlish Sea Wall and head north east to Dawlish Warren. Here you will find a lovely nature reserve on the Exe Estuary with a huge variety of waders to look out for. You can also pick up the Exe Valley Way at Dawlish Warren. Follow it north and it will take you into Exteter along the River Exe and the Exeter Canal. View Full Details>>
Thanet Coastal Path20 miles (32 km)Travel from Reculver to Pegwell Bay and enjoy bays, beaches and spectacular cliffs along this beautiful coastal path. The walk passes through several delightful coastal towns and villages including Birchington, Westgate on Sea, Margate and Ramsgate before finishing at the lovely Pegwell Bay.
Route highlights include the variety of coastal wildlife, the popular Botany Bay and the attractive harbours at Margate and Ramsgate. You'll also pass the delightful town of Broadstairs with its strong connections to Charles Dickens and wonderful views over Viking Bay. View Full Details>>
The Hangman Hills5 miles (7.5 km)A challenging circular walk visiting Little Hangman and Great Hangman Hills near Combe Martin in Devon.
The walk starts in Combe Martin and heads east to Little Hangman Hill via Lester Point. You continue by climbing the 1044 feet (318 metres) high Great Hangman Hill. It is England's highest sea cliff and the highest point on the South West Coast Path. At the summit you wil find a cairn and can enjoy fabulous views over the surrounding coast and countryside. The route then descends through the countryside to Knap Down, before returning to Combe Martin. Here you can wander through the pretty village, admire the beautiful Combe Martin Bay and reward yourself with refreshments at one of the excellent pubs.
In the summer months look out for pretty flowers such as primroses and violets and wildlife including warblers and various coastal birds.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could head east along the coast to the lovely Heddon Valley. Here you will find riverside walking trails and the imposing cliffs of Heddon's Mouth. View Full Details>>
Thorney Island9 miles (15 km)Enjoy a coastal walk along this beautiful peninsula in Chichester Harbour. The walk starts from Emsworth, near the train station. From here you can pick up the Sussex Border Path long distance footpath to take you south towards the marina. The waymarked path then takes you along the coast to the village of West Thorney before returning to Emsworth. Along the way there's views of the River Ems and lots of coastal wildlife to look out for. Part of the island is taken up by a British Army military base so it's important to keep to the footpaths. At the southern end of the island you will find a causeway connecting to the RSPB Pilsey Island. The reserve consists of a wide range of coastal habitats including sandflats, mudflats, dunes, shingle and saltmarsh. Look out for nesting oystercatchers and ringed plovers in this area.
To extend your walking in the area you could explore the Chidham peninsula on our Chichester Harbour Walk. It's located just to the east of Thorney Island and includes more nice coastal paths and great views of Bosham Quay and West Itchenor. View Full Details>>
Three Cliffs Bay4 miles (6 km)This walk visits the stunning Three Cliffs Bay on the Gower Peninsula before exploring the adjacent woodland of Nicholaston Burrows. It's an exceptionally beautiful area with the view over Three Cliffs Bay nominated for 'Britain's Best View' in a recent television programme. The area includes sand dunes, salt marsh and the signature three limestone cliffs. The lovely stream of Pennard Pill also flows into the middle of the bay. You can continue your walk along the cliff top to the pretty Nicholaston Burrows where you will find woodland trails and interesting flora such as bloody cranesbill, pyramidal orchids and a number of lichen species.
This circular walk starts in the little village of Penmaen and descends to Penmaen Burrows where you will find the remains of a Neolithic burial chamber and a medieval church. You then head west to Nicholaston Burrows, passing the Nicholaston Pill stream and enjoying great views over Oxwich Bay.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could pick up the Gower Way long distance walk or climb the sandstone ridge of Cefn Bryn for magnificent views over the area. The Pennard Castle Walk will take you to the nearby ruins of a 12th century grade II listed building and scheduled ancient monument with a fascinating history stretching back several centuries. View Full Details>>
Torquay to Babbacombe6 miles (9.5 km)This is a popular coastal walk from Torquay to the lovely Babbacombe Downs. It's about a 6 mile hike along an undulating section of the South West Coast Path. The route is fairly flat but there are some moderate climbs so a reasonable level of fitness is required. Along the way there's wonderful cliff top views, pretty beaches and some nice woodland sections.
At Babbacombe you'll find the Babbacombe Model Village, a pretty cliff top green and the Babbacombe Cliff Railway which will take you down to the attractive Oddicombe Beach. You can either return the same way or catch the bus back to Torquay.
The route starts on Corbyn Beach in Torquay, just a short hop from the train station. You head east along a pretty stretch of the English Riviera, passing the Grand Hotel and the marina with its rows of boats and yachts. You continue past Meadfoot Beach to the headland at Hope's Nose. Here you will find an area of geological significance with limestone rocks, lots of fossils and great views.
From Hope's Nose you turn north to Black Head before passing along the lovely Babbacombe cliff top path with well laid out gardens and more great views.
To extend the walk you can continue north to Maidencombe and Teignmouth, where you can enjoy a riverside walk along the River Teign. If you head along the other coast you can visit Paignton and Brixham on the Torquay to Brixham Walk.
Also in Torquay is Cockington Country Park with its ornamental lakes, woodlands and formal gardens. View Full Details>>
Treginnis Peninsula6 miles (9.5 km)This circular walk explores the beautiful coastline and fascinating geological features of the Treginnies Peninsula in the Pembrokeshire National Park. You will pass the oldest volcanic rocks in Wales, formed over 600 million years ago. It's a particularly beautiful stretch of coast with wonderful views over to the nearby Ramsey Island. It's also a great area for wildlife watching. Look out for birds including Peregrine, Oystercatcher, Kittiwake and Shag. You may also see porpoises in the water below and deer on Ramsey Island.
The walk starts at the Porth Clais car park and follows country lanes towards Treginnis Lodge where there are super views towards Skomer Island and St Bride's Bay.
Just past Treginnis Lodge you turn right off the country lane at the sign for Pencnwc Farm, and head north towards Porthstinian/St Justinian. At St Justinian you will pass the RNLI station, the Grade I listed ruined chapel and the small harbour where you can catch boats to Ramsey Island.
At St Justinian you pick up the Pembrokeshire Coast Path and head south passing the Iron Age hillfort of Castell Heinif and  Seal Bay where you can look out for seal pups in late summer and early autumn. You then head east along the coast passing Porthlysgi Bay with views of Skomer Island, Midland Isle and the Marloes Peninsula in the distance. Finally you pass around the pretty Porthclais Harbour before returning to the car park. It's a lovely area with wild horses and stunning coastal views while in the summer many of the coastal fields are covered with pretty heather. View Full Details>>
Trevose Head3 miles (5 km)Visit this coastal headland near Padstow and enjoy wonderful views along the length of the north Cornwall coast. There's a car park at the north western end of the headland near to the Trevose Head Lighthouse. From here you can pick up the South West Coast Path to take you past the lighthouse and Dinas Head. The path continues around Mother Ivey's Bay to the little village of Harlyn where there is a nice beach at the pretty Harlyn Bay. The bay is a nice place to stop and watch the surfers before heading back to the car park.
Features on the walk include the wild asparagus growing at Dinas Head, interesting rock formations on the cliffs and the secluded bathing beach at Mother Ivey's Bay. Look out for wildlife including fulmar, razorbill and guillemot as you make your way around this beautiful headland.
You can extend your walk by continuing east along the coastal path to Stepper Point just north of Padstow. Here you will find the 19th century Daymark Tower and fine views over the Camel Estuary. View Full Details>>
Two Tree Island2 miles (3 km)This expansive nature reserve in Leigh-on-Sea covers 257 hectares (640 acres). The site is located just a few miles along the coast from Southend and contains miles of nice walking trails. It's a lovely place with lots of little lagoons, pretty streams and great views across Hadleigh Ray to Canvey Island.
There's a huge amount of flora and fauna to look out for on the island. Saltmarsh plants include Sea Purslane, Common Sea-lavender, Sea Arrow-grass, Common Saltmarsh-grass and Sea Aster. There's lots of birdlife with thousands of waders including Avocets, Curlew, Dunlin, Redshank and Grey Prover.  You'll also see lots of butterflies around the plants and wildflowers in the summer months. Look out for Marbled White, Small Skipper and Essex Skipper as you make your way along the footpaths.
The reserve is accessible with an on site car park and Leigh-on-Sea rail station within walking distance.
Two Tree Island is located very close to Hadleigh Country Park where you can visit the ruined castle and explore the extensive grounds.
You could also cross the water to Canvey Island and enjoy a nice walk along the coastal path. View Full Details>>
Undercliff Walk Brighton3 miles (5 km)Follow the Undercliff Walk from Brighton Marina to Saltdean on this exhilarating coastal walk or cycle. The path runs for about 3 miles along the sea wall with the wonderful white cliffs on one side and the shingle beach and sea on the other. It can be a very exciting walk when the waves are crashing against the sea wall but do take care on particularly windy days as the water can come right over onto the path.
The route passes along National Cycle Network route 2 so it's open to cyclists as well. Please note that pedestrians have priority so please keep to a reasonable speed on your ride. The path is flat and well surfaced so it's a nice easy ride for beginners or families to try.
The path starts from the marina about a mile east from the town centre. You pass Roedean and Rottingdean before finishing at the village of Saltdean. Here you will find the Grade II Listed Saltdean Lido built in 1937-38 to designs by the architect Richard Jones.
There's plenty of nice cafes along the way where you can stop for refreshments before starting the return leg. You could return via Ovingdean and the East Brighton Golf course on more elevated paths as an alternative.
If you felt like extending your walk you can continue to Newhaven along the wonderful Brighton to Newhaven clifftop path. View Full Details>>
Valeways Millennium Heritage Trail65 miles (105 km)This is a circular walk through the Vale of Glamorgan which includes a splendid coastal section along the Glamorgan Heritage Coast. The route runs through Peterston-super-Ely, Barry, Cowbridge, Llantwit Major, St Brides Major and Llanharry, Ewenny Priory and St. Fagans. The route includes a waterside section along the River Ely as you pass the through the beautiful Ely Valley. You will also pass through the lovely Porthkerry Country Park near Barry, while also visiting the historic castles at Boverton and St Donat's.
The walk is waymarked with a yellow and white disc. View Full Details>>
Valley of the Rocks4 miles (6 km)This walk visits the amazing Valley of the Rocks in the Exmoor National Park. This dry valley contains the geological marvels known as the Lynton Beds. These ancient rocks are a spectacular sight and hugely popular with walkers.
The walk starts in Lynton and heads west along the South West Coast Path to the Valley. Look out for feral goats as you make your way through the countryside. It's a good path and a fairly easy climb from Lynton, with wonderful views of the North Devon coast. You'll pass Wringcliff Bay, Castle Rock, Lee Bay and Lee Abbey. View Full Details>>
Wantsum Walk19 miles (30 km)This is a super walk from Herne Bay to Birchington which includes both coastal and riverside stretches.
You start off at the pier in the delightful Herne Bay and follow the coastline to Bishopstone Manor. Here you turn inland through Chislet Marshes towards Upstreet, where you join the River Great Stour for some riverside walking. You continue through Sarre and St Nicholas at Wade, before rejoining the coast path to Birchington, finishing near the train station.
This is just one of the Wantsum Walks which pass through the area and can be viewed on OS maps. View Full Details>>
Warkworth to Alnmouth3 miles (5.5 km)This is another splendid stretch of the Northumberland coast, with a historic castle, beautiful beaches, interesting villages and lovely bays to enjoy. It's an easy 3.5 mile walk on flat paths, so ideal for an afternoon stroll. Look out for wildlife including Arctic terns, and flora such as cowslips and harebells in the sand dunes.
The walk starts in Warkworth near the castle. The atmospheric ruins of the 12th century castle are well worth exploring before you start the walk. From the medieval castle you follow the path north, crossing the River Coquet, before heading towards Birling Links and Birling Carrs on the coast. You then pass along the pretty beach with its attractive sand dunes, wildflowers and far reaching views. The walk then crosses the lovely River Aln Estuary before finishing in Alnmouth. The village is a picturesque coastal resort, popular with tourists. If you prefer you can start the walk from Alnmouth railway station and walk in the other direction.
The St Oswald's Way long distance way passes through the area. Continue north on the path and you can visit the village of Craster and the striking Dunstanburgh Castle. View Full Details>>
Wembury Point3 miles (5 km)This delightful area near Plymouth has recently been restored by the National Trust. It's a lovely stretch of coast and countryside with a good footpath and wonderful views of the Yealm Estuary, the Mewstone, Plymouth Breakwater and onto Rame Head in Cornwall. The surrounding countryside is very pretty too with ox-eye daisies and bluebells in the spring.
The walk starts at the Wembury Bay National Trust car park and follows Marine Drive, the old access road to HMS Cambridge, past Blackstone Rocks to Wembury Point. You continue to Heybrook Bay before an inland stretch through the countryside. The final section runs along the coast, returning you to the car park.
It's a splendid area with spectacular coastal cliffs and a variety of wildlife. Look out for Dartmoor Ponies, basking sharks, porpoises, dolphins and many different types of birds. Wembury beach is also beautiful with some of the best rock pools in the country.
If you wanted to extend your walk then you could pick up the Erme Plym Trail and follow it towards Plymouth. Also just to the east is the lovely Gara Point and Yealm Estuary near Newton Ferrers. View Full Details>>
Wessex Ridgeway137 miles (221 km)This wonderful trail runs from Marlborough in Wiltshire to Lyme Regis on the Jurassic coast in Dorset. You will pass:
- Overton Down
- The mystical Avebury Stones
- The White Horse at Bratton
- Wardour Castle ruins
- Ibberton Hill with splendid views
-The Vale of Pewsey
- Salisbury Plain
- Pilsdon Pen - with panoramic views of Marshwood Vale
- Cerne Abbas Giant - the mysterious figure on Giant Hill in Dorset thought to have been created in the 17th century
- Win Green Hill, the highest point in the Cranborne Chase AONB
-Bulbarrow Hill - this Iron Age Hill fort near Blandform Forum command wonderful views over Blackmore Vale.
Roundway Hill - the site of a 1643 Civil War battle, also includes the Oliver's Castle Iron Age Hillfort. View Full Details>>
West Somerset Coast Path25 miles (40 km)Follow the beautiful Somerset coast through the Quantock Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty on this lovely coastal walk.
The walk begins at the car park at Steart, next to the Bridgwater Bay Nature Reserve. You then follow the path west, along the coast, to the village of Watchet with its pretty harbour and piers.
From Watchet, you continue to Minehead along Blue Anchor Bay and Dunster Beach Nature Reserve.
This is an excellent walk for anyone with an interest in geology as local people have uncovered the remains of elk antlers and wild boar tusks on the shores. Fossilised oak and yew tree sections are also still visible in places.
Also of interest are the views of Flat Holm and Steep Holm Islands which you can visit by boat from Minehead in the summer. On a clear day, there are also good views of the South Wales coast across the Bristol Channel. View Full Details>>
West Wittering and East Head10 miles (16 km)The pretty village of West Wittering has lovely coastal footpaths to try. You can park at the beach car park and then follow paths along the beach and onto the National Trust owned East Head. Here you can stroll through shingle, sandy beach and a delightful sand dune habitat. The area is great for wildlife with skylarks, ringed plover and common seals to look out for. There's also lots of pretty wildflowers and great views over Chichester Harbour to Hayling Island.
After exploring the dunes you can head north along the New Lipchis Way to West Itchenor. It's about a 4 mile walk along a pretty coast path with lovely views all the way.
If you would like to extend your walk you could catch the ferry from West Itchenor to Bosham and then explore Chichester Harbour and Thorney Island. You could also continue east along the New Lipchis Way to Birdham where you can visit Chichester Marina. View Full Details>>
Whitby to Robin's Hood Bay6 miles (10 km)This coastal walk follows a popular section of the Cleveland Way from Whitby to Robin's Hood Bay. It's a beautiful stretch of coast with pretty bays and cliff top views. The walk runs for about 7 miles on generally good, waymarked footpaths.
The walk starts in Whitby on the River Esk and heads to Whitby Abbey. The atmospheric ruined abbey overlooks the North Sea on the East Cliff above Whitby. It's a very photogenic spot with the abbey ruins surrounded by coast, river and countryside.
The route continues to Saltwick Bay and the Whitby Lighthouse, before passing Oakham Beck and Rain Dale. Soon after you come to the fishing village of Robin Hood's Bay. The village is very picturesque with lots of old fishermen's cottages.
To extend your walk you can continue along the coast path to Ravenscar and visit Harwood Dale Forest. There's lots of footpaths and bridleways to explore the coniferous woodland with its pine and spruce trees, streams and ponds.
Wainwright's Coast to Coast starts at Robin's Hood Bay so you could pick up this long distance trail and head inland towards Littlebeck and explore the North York Moors National Park. For example you could head just south of Littlebeck and visit the lovely Falling Foss waterfall.
You can virtually follow this stretch of coast using the google street view link below! View Full Details>>
White Cliffs Country Trails28 miles (45 km)This circular route takes you on a tour of the beautiful Kent coastline around Dover, before heading inland into the countryside.
You start at Dover and pass the impressive Dover Castle and the famous white cliffs (explore with google street view below). Dover castle has fabulous exhibitions, winding tunnels to explore and shops and cafes for refreshment.
You continue north along the coast passing the Victorian South Foreland Lighthouse, the lovely Pines Gardens and the beautiful St Margaret's Bay at St Margarets-at-cliffe, before arriving at Walmer with its fascinating castle and splendid gardens.
The route then passes the pretty town of Deal, which boasts another impressive coastal castle. One of the finest Tudor artillery castles in England, it is another major highlight on the walk.
Shortly after Deal, you will turn inland near Sandwich, crossing the famous Royal St Georges Golf Club which has hosted the British Open 13 times. You then pass through the historic town of Sandwich on the River Stour. The walk then meanders through the delightful Kent countryside, passing Northbourne and Whitfield, before returning to Dover. View Full Details>>
Whiteford Sands4 miles (6 km)This beautiful nature reserve on the North Gower coast has lovely walking trails through woodland and sand dunes with nice coastal views. The area is fantastic for wildlife watching with several species of wading birds and wildfowl too look out for.
The walk starts from the parking area in Llanmadoc and heads through Cwm Ivy where there are some nice woodland trails and Cwm Ivy marsh. You continue to Berges Island where you can enjoy great views across the sands to the lighthouse at Whiteford Point.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could climb the sandstone ridge across Cefn Bryn. The climb to Cefn Bryn beacon offers fabulous views over the Gower. View Full Details>>
Whitley Bay to Tynemouth3 miles (5 km)Enjoy a coastal walk along the North East coast from Whitley Bay to Tynemouth. It's about a three mile walk with nice beaches, bays and cliffs to admire.
The walk starts from Whitley Sands and heads south to Cullercoats Bay and the beach at Long Sands. You then pass Sharpness Point before arriving ay Tynemouth Castle. The fascinating castle includes moated castle-towers, a gatehouse, a keep and the ruins of a Benedictine priory. It dates from the 13–14th century and is situated on a dramatic headland overlooking Tynemouth Pier. You can explore the grounds for a fee payed to English Heritage.
After leaving the castle you continue past Tynemouth Pier which is a nice place for an afternoon stroll. It stretches out to sea for about 900 yards (810 metres). There's an impressive lighthouse at the end of the pier and nice views back up to the castle and the mouth of the River Tyne.
To extend your walk catch the ferry over to the South Shields and continue up the coast to Souter Lighthouse and Whitburn Coastal Park. Here you can also visit the Leas with its two and a half miles of magnesian limestone cliffs, wave-cut foreshore and coastal grassland. View Full Details>>
Whitstable to Herne Bay5 miles (8 km)Enjoy a coastal walk between these two attractive Kent towns. It's a nice easy, five mile walk, using a section of the Saxon Shore Way. You can return the same way or catch a train back to Whitstable.
The route starts by Whitstable Harbour which is flanked by attractive shingle/sandy beaches. One notable feature of the town is 'The Street', a natural strip of shingle on clay bank which runs out to sea at right angles to the coast, for a distance of about 1⁄2 mile (800 m). Located to the east of the harbour, The Street is revealed only at low tide, when it is possible to walk out along it.
From the harbour you head east past Tankerton Beach with its row of expensive beach huts. The route continues past Hampton Pier and beach, before finishing at Herne Bay Pier. The town includes an impressive 2 miles (3 km) shingle beach, which has been awarded a European Blue Flag and the yellow and blue Seaside Award for its safety and cleanliness. The seafront also features a Victorian bandstand and gardens, amusement arcades, children's play areas and the world's first freestanding purpose-built Clock Tower, built in 1837.
To extend your walking in the area, you can continue east along the coast to Birchington and Margate. If you head south from Whitstable you can visit Clowes Wood. Here you will find lots of nice walking and cycling trails through mixed woodland, heathland and wet meadow. View Full Details>>
Wirral Circular Trail37 miles (60 km)Explore the beautiful Wirral Peninsula on this circular cycling and walking trail. The 60 km (37 mile) trail starts at the Seacombe Ferry Terminal and visits Wallasey, Hoylake, Heswall and Neston. Along the way there's splendid views over the Mersey to the city of Liverpool on the eastern side of the peninsula. At the northern end around Hoylake you can look out upon the estuary of the River Dee and the Irish Sea. On the western side you will pass West Kirby and the splendid Wirral Country Park with boulder-clay cliffs and more great views of the Dee Estuary and the lovely Hilbre Island. You can visit the island at low tide and look out for grey seals.
Other highlights include Eastham Country Park on the eastern side of the Wirral. Here you'll find 100 acres of broadleaf woodland with surfaced walking paths and a cycle track. You will also pass the fascinating model village at Port Sunlight and the delightful village of Parkgate with its marshes and wide variety of birdlife. View Full Details>>
Woody Bay2 miles (3 km)Explore this peaceful wooded cove and enjoy waterfalls, woodland trails and splendid views of the Bristol Channel. Woody Bay is located on the coast of the Exmoor National Park. The Hanging Water stream runs through the woodland with lovely waterfalls and interesting flora and fauna to enjoy.
This walk starts at the car park on Sir Robert's Path and takes you through the woodland to the pretty little bay with its secluded pebble beach.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could head west along the coast to the lovely Heddon Valley. Here you will find riverside walking trails and the imposing cliffs of Heddon's Mouth. You could also start the walk from here as shown in the video below.
If you head east then you will come to the spectacular Valley of the Rocks. View Full Details>>
Zennor Churchway and Tinners Way30 miles (48 km)A circular walk offering splendid views of the Cornish countryside and coast around St Ives and St Just.
The walk begins at the beautiful resort of St Ives, taking you past the harbour and pier and around St Ives head. The path then climbs through or past Venton Vision, Trowan, Trevalgan, Trevega, Trendrine, Boscubben, Wicca, Lower Tregerthen and Tremedda, mostly at between 350 and 400 feet – before descending to the pretty little village of Zennor.
From Zennor you continue to Higher Porthmeor, Rosemergy and Pendeen on an easy section of the walk which passes farms and the old flour mill at Trewey.
The path then heads from Pendeen towards Cape Cornwall passing the interesting Geevor Mine Museum and the charming Lower Boscaswell village before joining the coast path to Cape Cornwall. The coastal views from here are wonderful with Land's End just four miles away.
At Cape Cornwall you join the Tinners Way and turn back east towards the delightful village of St Just with galleries and tea shops to enjoy. You then cross a series of heather covered commons with various landmarks of historical interest including Tregeseal Stone Circle, Chun Quoit and Castle, and Bosullow Trehyllys iron age settlement.
The path continues through Bosullow Common and onto Towednack, passing the fascinating Nine Maidens stone circle and the Bodrifty Iron Age Village on the way.
The final section takes you from the pretty village of Towdenack and descends to the finish point back at St Ives. View Full Details>>

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