GPS Cycle and Walking Routes

Bishop Bennet Way

32 miles (52 km)

The Bishop Bennet Way is a shared walking and cycling path running from Beeston in Cheshire to Wirswall on the Shropshire borders.
The route starts at the 13th century Beeston Castle and proceeds through Milton Green, Churton and Shocklach where you will pass the Grade I listed Norman church.
You continue to Grindley Brook where you cross the Shropshire Union Canal shortly before finishing at Wirswall near Whitchurch.
For cyclists please note that a mountain bike is required for this route as there are some fairly rugged off road sections.

Bishop Bennet Way OS Map - Mobile GPS OS Map with Location tracking

Bishop Bennet Way Open Street Map - Mobile GPS Map with Location tracking

Pubs/Cafes

The Letters Inn is a historic pub in the heart of the pretty village of Tattenhall in Cheshire. Inside there's a cosy roaring fire while outside there's a sun-trap terrace garden area. You can find them on the Hgh Street at postcode CH3 9PX. They are dog friendly if you are walking with your canine friend.

Further Information and Other Local Ideas

At Cheshire based Tattenhall you can visit the noteworthy Ice Cream Farm, the largest ice cream shop in the world. The popular tourist attraction includes expansive children's play areas, farm animals and quad bikes. You can find them at Drumlan Hall, Newton Ln, CH3 9NE.
Just off the route in Cheshire you'll find the interesting village of Farndon. The village includes a noteworthy medieval bridge which spans the River Dee, connecting England to Wales. There's also The Hare for a pleasant pit stop. They serve good quality food and have a fine choice of real ales. Outside there's a pleasant terrace area where you can relax on warmer days. The pub is located on the High Street at postcode CH3 6PU for your sat navs.

Photos

Bishop Bennet Way - geograph.org.uk - 1244364

Well-maintained and attractive byway north of Cuddington Heath. The Bishop Bennet Way is a route for cyclists and horse-riders from Beeston Castle to Wirswall.

Ford Lane ford - geograph.org.uk - 177176

Ford Lane ford. Recently maintained ford crossing Crimes Brook and providing access to farmland to the north. To the right of the picture is a stile on the trail.

Bishop Bennet Way near Beeston - geograph.org.uk - 1819351

Near Beeston

Tushingham cum Grindley - cottage on the Bishop Bennet Way - geograph.org.uk - 219023

Cottage on the Bishop Bennet Way (Tushingham bridleway 20) at its junction with footpath 12 and the ORPA from the Blue Bell pub at Bell o'th' Hill.

Hinton Court, near Whitchurch - geograph.org.uk - 1230178

Hinton Court, near Whitchurch. Timbered red-brick farmhouse with attached farm buildings adjacent to Hinton Old Hall (concealed by trees on right). The buildings straddle the square boundary; the front is in square, the farm buildings on the left side are partly inSJ5443. View from the South Cheshire Way and the trail, borth of which follow the farm track (right) and then go to the left (north) of the farm.

View north from the Bishop Bennet Way, near Wirswall - geograph.org.uk - 1229642

Near Wirswall. View north from the Bishop Bennet Way and South Cheshire Way immediately west of the high point (c. 145 metres) to the south of Wirswall. The flat Cheshire plain (right) is contrasted with the hillier Shropshire countryside (left)

Farmland by the A49 - geograph.org.uk - 1230234

Farmland by the A49 Undulating farmland with occasional mature deciduous trees on either side of the A49. Cattle and sheep pasture, as in the foreground field, is the dominant agricultural land use in this area. The low-lying area near the road (centre left) shows clumps of marsh grass. Hinton Bank Farm is in the distance (centre left).

Beeston Castle - geograph.org.uk - 1566429

Beeston Castle. The medieval ruins of Beeston Castle stand on a rocky summit 500ft above the Cheshire plain, offering views from the Pennines in the east to the mountains of Wales in the west. It dates from 1225 when it was built by Ranulf, the sixth Earl of Chester, and contains one of the deepest castle wells in the country. It was seized by King Henry III in 1237 and used by him and later his son, King Edward I, as a base for their campaigns against the Welsh. The castle was finally destroyed at the end of the Civil War.

Video

GPS Files

GPX File

Bishop Bennet Way.gpx (On Desktop:Right Click>'Save As. On Ipad/Iphone:Click and hold>Share>Save to Files')

Memory Map Route

Bishop Bennet Way.mmo (On Desktop:Right Click>'Save As. On Ipad/Iphone:Click and hold >Share>Save to Files)