GPS Cycle and Walking Routes

Green London Way

100 miles (161 km)

Explore the best and most beautiful of London's open spaces on this circular walk through the capital. The route has been split up into 18 sections as follows:

1. Stratford to North Woolwich
2. Abbey Wood and Shooters Hill
3. Woolwich to Greenwich
4. Greenwich to Forest Hill
5. Forest Hill to Crystal Palace
6. Crystal Palace to Balham
7. Balham to Wimbledon
8. Wimbledon to Richmond
9. Richmond to Kew Bridge
10. Kew Bridge to Hanwell
11. Hanwell to Greenford
12. Greenford to South Kenton
13. South Kenton to Brent Cross
14. Brent Cross to Hampstead
15. Hampstead to Finsbury Park
16. Finsbury Park to Clapton
17. Clapton to Victoria Park
18. Victoria Park to Stratford

You'll pass a series of delightful parks including Wimbledon Common, Richmond Park, Hampstead Heath and Kew Gardens. There are also waterside sections along the River Thames and the Brent River to enjoy.

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Green London Way OS Map - Mobile GPS OS Map with Location tracking

Green London Way Open Street Map - Mobile GPS Map with Location tracking

Pubs/Cafes

In Hampstead, one noteworthy place worth consideration is The Spaniards Inn. The pub dates from 1585 and has some interesting literary connections. John Keats apparently penned Ode to a Nightingale in the garden and the pub is also mentioned in Charles Dickens’ Pickwick Papers.There's an attractive interior with oak-panelled walls, chandeliers, beams and log fires. Outside there's a nice garden with a BBQ on warmer days. You can find the inn on Spaniards Road at the north western end of the heath. Postcode for your sat nav is NW3 7JJ.

Further Information and Other Local Ideas

For more walking ideas in the area see the London Walks page.

Photos

Wimbledon Common - geograph.org.uk - 1339745

Wimbledon Common. The expansive common is a popular place for walkers and cyclists with miles of wide trails. There's also the iconic windmill which includes an interesting museum detailing the history of the area.

Hampstead Heath - geograph.org.uk - 1003989

Hampstead Heath. Ladies talk while walking their dogs on a bright autumn morning. This ancient heath sits astride a sandy ridge, one of thehighest points in London, running fromHampsteadtoHighgate, which rests on a band ofLondon Clay.The heath is rambling and hilly, embracing ponds, recent and ancient woodlands, alido, playgrounds, and a training track, and it adjoins the former stately home ofKenwood Houseand its estate. The south-east part of the heath isParliament Hill, from which the view over London is protected by law. Running along its eastern perimeter is a chain of ponds – including three open-air public swimming pools – which were originallyreservoirsfor drinking water from theRiver Fleet.

Richmond Park - geograph.org.uk - 2026163

Richmond Park. A wonderful deer park with cycle trails, gardens, views to central London and a golf course. The park is of national and international importance for wildlife conservation. It was created by Charles I in the 17th century as a deer park. It is now a national nature reserve, a Site of Special Scientific Interest and a Special Area of Conservation and is included, at Grade I, on Historic England's Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of special historic interest in England. Its landscapes have inspired many famous artists and it has been a location for several films and TV series.The park ncludes many buildings of architectural or historic interest. TheGrade I-listedWhite Lodgewasformerly a royal residenceand is now home to theRoyal Ballet School.

Kew Bridge - geograph.org.uk - 2138195

Kew Bridge and the River Thames.

Richmond Bridge - geograph.org.uk - 2593165

Richmond Bridge. An 18th-centurystone arch bridgethat crosses theRiver ThamesatRichmond, connecting the two halves of the present-dayLondon Borough of Richmond upon Thames.It is Grade I listed.

Finsbury Park - geograph.org.uk - 2125980

Finsbury Park. The park was one of the first ofthe great London parkslaid out in theVictorian era. The park borders the neighbourhoods ofHarringay,Finsbury Park,Stroud Green, andManor House. It includes a mixture of open ground, formal gardens, avenues of mature trees and anarboretum. There is also a lake, a children's play area, a cafe and an art exhibition space.

Victoria park1

The bathing pond at Victoria Park. Unused for bathing since the 1930s, it is now popular with anglers The park (known colloquially asVicky Parkor thePeople's Park) is located in theLondon Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is the largest park in Tower Hamlets and one of London's most visited green spaces with approximately 9 million visitors every year. The park spans 86.18 hectares (213.0 acres) of open space and opened to the public in 1845.

Crystal Palace Park - geograph.org.uk - 2134150

Crystal Palace Park. This Victorianpleasure groundis located in theSouth Londonsuburb ofCrystal Palacesurrounding the site of the formerCrystal PalaceExhibition building. The Palace had been relocated fromHyde Park, Londonafter the 1851Great Exhibitionand rebuilt with some modifications and enlargements to form the centrepiece of the pleasure ground, before being destroyed by fire in 1936. The park featuresfull-scale models of dinosaursin a landscape, amaze, lakes, and aconcert bowl. The park is situated halfway along theNorwood Ridgeat one of its highest points. This ridge offers views northward to central London, eastward to theQueen Elizabeth II BridgeandGreenwich, and southward toCroydonand theNorth Downs.

Elevation Profile

Video