GPS Cycle and Walking Routes

Bigbury on Sea Walks

10 miles (16 km)

This attractive seaside village is located in the South Hams area of South Devon. It's a popular place for a walk with a beautiful beach, a fantastic tidal island, a river estuary and some splendid countryside. There's also a couple of noteworthy ancient pubs with a history dating back over 700 years.
This route uses part of the Avon Estuary Walk and the South West Coast Path to create a circular walk around the village. On the way you'll visit Burgh Island and the neighbouring villages of Aveton Gifford and Bigbury.
The route starts on the sea front in the village and heads over to the island. You can cross over on foot over the beach at low tide or catch the sea tractor run by the hotel on the island. The island has a strong assocation with Agatha Christie, serving as the inspirational setting for the mystery 'And Then There Were None'.
After exploring the island you return to the mainland and head along the coast to Sharpland Point, Folly Hill and Cockleridge. Here you can catch the seasonal ferry over the Avon to Bantham on the opposite side. The route then picks up the Avon Estuary Walk and follows the waymarked footpath north east past Aunemouth Sands, Stiddicombe Wood, Stadbury Farm and Efford Farm before coming to Aveton Giffford Bridge. Here you cross the river to enter the village of Aveton Giffford. The pretty village lies at the head of the estuary of theRiver Avon and includes a 13th century church and the streamside Fisherman's Rest pub.
After exploring the village you head south west along the other side of the river, passing Milburn Orchard, Bigbury village and Bigbury golf course. Shortly after passing around the course you descend back into Bigbury on Sea.

Bigbury on Sea OS Map - Mobile GPS OS Map with Location tracking

Bigbury on Sea Open Street Map - Mobile GPS Map with Location tracking

Pubs/Cafes

On the route you could stop off at the Journey's End for some refreshments. It's a pub of some note, dating all the way back to the 13th century. Inside there's a cosy interior with four fires and a lovely conservatory. Outside there's a large garden area for warmer days. They serve high quality food and can be found at Ringmore with a postcode of TQ7 4HL for your sat navs.
On Burgh Island a visit to the 14th century Pilchard Inn is also recommended. The historic pub first served the fishermen who lived on the Island and mainland shores over 700 years ago; then the smugglers and wreckers who lured ships onto the Western rocks; and now hotel guests and the public. There's a nice outdoor area with views to enjoy with your meal. You can find them at postcode TQ7 4BG.

Dog Walking

The coast and country trails make for a fine dog walk.Dogsare welcome on the main beach from October to May, with the beach to the west of the causeway welcomingdogsthroughout the year. It's best to keep them on leads in the Burgh Island area. The two old pubs mentioned above are also dog friendly.

Further Information and Other Local Ideas

Head a few miles east from the village and you could visit the neighbouring town of Kingsbridge. Here you can pick up the Kingsbridge and Bowcombe Creek Walk and the Salcombe and Kingsbridge Estuary Walk. There's some great wildlife spotting opportunities here. Also to the east you can pick up the coastal Hope Cove to Salcombe Walk.
Head west along the coast path and you will soon come to the Erme Estuary and the lovely Wonwell Beach.
For more walking ideas in the area see the Devon Walks page.

Photos

Signpost on coast path, Bigbury-on-Sea - geograph.org.uk - 1474876

Signpost on coast path, Bigbury-on-Sea. A signpost on Marine drive directs walkers along the top of slumped cliffs at the village, towards the sand that connects (except at high tide) Burgh Island to the mainland.

Bigbury-on-Sea - geograph.org.uk - 1733946

The view of Bigbury-on-Sea from the Pilchard Inn on Burgh Island, with the causeway exposed at low tide.

Thurlestone, near Stiddicombe Wood - geograph.org.uk - 632479

Thurlestone: near Stiddicombe Wood. A view upstream on a public footpath from Bantham with the Avon estuary at low tide. Stiddicombe Wood on the right

Thurlestone, Jenkins Quay, Bantham - geograph.org.uk - 1551511

Thurlestone, Jenkins Quay, Bantham. Near the mouth of the Avon, on Bantham Ham

Avon Estuary - geograph.org.uk - 286524

Avon Estuary. After a delightful crossing aboard the diminutive Bantham ferry operated by the harbour master and his dog, you are rewarded with this view of Burgh Island. The island, cut off at high tide, is occupied by a hotel that was apparently frequented by Agatha Christie, and the medieval Pilchard Inn.

Aveton Gifford, near North Efford - geograph.org.uk - 632485

Aveton Gifford, near North Efford. The River Avon, looking upstream on a December afternoon at low tide

Creek near Milburn Orchard - geograph.org.uk - 1574698

Creek near Milburn Orchard. A tidal creek leading into the Avon Estuary. Taken from the Tidal Road at the mouth of the creek.

Bigbury, towards Green Well - geograph.org.uk - 632481

Bigbury: towards Green Well. With the quay at Villa Crusoe beyond, on the left and the River Avon at low tide. Seen from a point near Stiddicombe Wood on a public path from Bantham

Video

GPS Files

GPX File

Bigbury on Sea.gpx (On Desktop:Right Click>'Save As. On Ipad/Iphone:Click and hold>Share>Save to Files')

Memory Map Route

Bigbury on Sea.mmo (On Desktop:Right Click>'Save As. On Ipad/Iphone:Click and hold >Share>Save to Files)