GPS Cycle and Walking Routes


Welcome to GPS Cycle and Walking Routes

We now have nearly 1000 cycle routes on the site, covering the whole of the UK's National Cycle Network in England, Scotland, and Wales

There are also over 1000 walking routes including all of the national trails and most of the UK's long distance trails.

You can use the links below to view a list of cycle and walking routes organised by county. Each route is available for download in a number of different GPS formats with a google map and Ordnance Survey map accompanying each route so you can see where you'll be heading.

Many of the routes follow the National Cycle Network (NCN) routes with the number of the route(s) followed specified in the description.

All the routes come with a fantastic photgraphic aerial view of the route with points of interest and photographs

Cycle Routes in Wales and Scotland

WalesScotland

National Parks & AONB Cycle Routes

Park/AONBNo. RoutesPark/AONBNo. Routes
Brecon Beacons12Cotswolds11
Lake District19New Forest8
Peak District24South Downs12

Latest Cycle Routes

Bristol and Bath Railway Path16 miles (26 km)*
Aspley Woods3 miles (5 km)***
Silverhill Wood2 miles (3.2 km)**
Teversal Trail4 miles (7 km)**
Willingham Woods3 miles (4.8 km)**
Eastridge Woods5 miles (8 km)****

Walking Routes in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland

WalesScotlandNorthern Ireland

Latest Walking Routes

Houghton Mill2 miles (4 km)Explore the delightful water meadows at Houghton Mill on this lovely walk in Huntingdon. It's a lovely area with views of the River Great Ouse, pretty streams, weirs and beautiful countryside.
The walk starts from the National Trust car park at Houghton Mill. The working 18th-century watermillis set in an idyllic location on an island in the Great Ouse River.
Follow the footpaths south along the water towards Battcock's Island and Hemingford Grey. Here you have the option of visiting Hemingford Grey Manor which dates from the 12th century. The interesting house and gardens are open to visitors.
The route then turns north to pass along another stream before picking up the riverside path to return to the mill.
After your walk you can enjoy refreshments at the lovely tea room which overlooks the mill. You can also buy some freshly ground wholemeal flour from the shop.
Ben Vrackie5 miles (8 km)Climb to the summit of Ben Vrackie on this challenging walk in Pitlochry.
Start the walk from the car park just to the north of the town near Moulin. The route then heads north, skirting the edge of the woodland of the Tay Forest Park. You climb towards Craig Bhreac before coming to the lovely Loch a' Choire. The final section takes you up some steps to the 841m (2759feet) summit. From here there are wonderful views over the Cairngorms.
You can return the same way or try an alternative path around the western side of Loch a' Choire.
Pitlochry Killiecrankie and Loch Faskally4 miles (6.5 km)A lovely waterside walk from Pitlochry to Killiecrankie, taking in Loch Faskally, the River Tummel, the Faskally Forest, Loch Donmore and the River Garry. It's a beautiful area with shady woodland paths, peaceful lakes and wonderful views of the surrounding Cairngorm hills.
Start the walk from the visitor centre and car park in Pitlochry, next to the loch and the dam. From the centre you can see thesalmon ladderwhere the fish leap their way up the river from March to October.
You start by picking up footpaths heading north west along the loch to the Tay Forest Park. Here you will pass along nice woodland trails in the Faskally Forest with a visit to the delightful little Loch Dunmore. It's a lovely spot with loch surrounded by Douglas fir,silver firs,wild cherry, andoak trees, some of which are over 100 years old.
After you emerge from the woods you pick up riverside trails along the River Garry to Killiecrankie. You'll pass along the train line before finishing at the visitor centre, near to the viaduct.
The village is significant as the location for Battle of Killiecrankiein 1689, during theJacobite Rebellion. In the splendid wooded gorge you can visit 'Soldier's Leap', the spot where a Redcoat soldier leapt 18ft across the raging River Garry, fleeing the Jacobites. Also look out for wildlife including red squirrels, woodpeckers and pine martens.
The visitor centre has lots of information about the history of the area and a nice cafe where you can enjoy refreshments after your walk.
Hastings Circular Walk6 miles (9.4 km)This fine circular walk around Hastings visits the coast and countryside to the east of the town. The route runs for about 6 miles with some moderate climbs along the way. It's a varied walk with woodland trails, hill climbs and coastal sections to enjoy.
The walk starts at the harbour in Hastings and heads east along the Saxon Shore Way long distance footpath. The trail takes you along the coast to Hastings Country Park. Here you'll find 600 acres of parkland and woodland to explore on a number of paths. Features in the park include sandstone cliffs, shady glens covered with gorse and trees, nature trails and picnic areas. It's also great for wildlife with Peregrines, black redstarts and fulmars to look out for.
After passing through the park you continue along Covehurst Bay before turning north toward Fairlight. You then turn west through farmland where you pick up a section of the 1066 Country Walk to take you past Ecclesbourne Reservoir and High Wickham. At Ecclesbourne Glen you can visit the waterfalls and interesting rock formations.
The final section descends past East Hill back to the sea front and the finish point of the walk.
Lewes to Eastbourne20 miles (32.2 km)A long walk from Lewes to Eastbourne taking in some of the loveliest South Downs scenery. The route runs for about 20 miles, beginning with a riverside walk along the River Ouse to Southease where you pick up the South Downs Way. You can then follow the long distance trail all the way to Eastbourne, passing Firle Beacon, Alfriston, the Cuckmere River, the Long Man of Wilmington, Windover Hill and Jevington. There's much to enjoy with riverside trails, wonderful views to the coast from the high points and a nice coastal section into Eastbourne at the end.
This section of the downs is great for flora and fauna with lots of pretty heather and wildflowers to see. You can also look out for wildlife including the delightful Exmoor Ponies.
While the start and end of the route are quite flat, there are some quite challenging hill climbs along the way.

Useful Links

LinkDescription
River Thames Walk and CycleInformation on walking and cycling on the Thames Path National Trail