GPS Cycle and Walking Routes


Walking Routes in England

England is covered with hundreds of well signed walking paths and trails passing through some of the most beautiful and unspoilt parts of the country.
We have organised these routes by county with an overview map also available.

Please use the links below to view the currently mapped routes.


CountyCounty
BedfordshireBerkshire
BuckinghamshireCambridgeshire
CheshireCornwall
County DurhamCumbria
DerbyshireDevon
DorsetEssex
GloucestershireGreater London
Greater ManchesterHampshire
HerefordshireHertfordshire
Isle of WightKent
LancashireLeicestershire
LincolnshireMerseyside
NorfolkNorthamptonshire
NorthumberlandNottinghamshire
OxfordshireRutland
ShropshireSomerset
StaffordshireSuffolk
SurreySussex
WarwickshireWest Midlands
WiltshireWorcestershire
Yorkshire

Latest Walking Routes

Tees Barrage Walk4 miles (6 km)This waterside walk in Stockton-on-Tees explores the riverside paths next to the River Tees Barrage. The 3.5 mile circular route runs on nice flat trails on both sides of the river.
The route starts from the car park on the northern side of the river near to the Tees Barrage. The barrage is used to control the flow of the river, preventing flooding and the effects of tidal change. It consists of a river barrage, road bridge, footbridge, barge lock, fish pass and white water course. The area is used for watersports such as canoeing, jet skiing, dragonboat racing and incorporates a 1 km rowing course.
You start by crossing the river on the barrage footbridge before heading west along the path to the impressive Infinity Bridge. The bridge links the Teesdale Business Park and the University of Durham's Queen's Campus in Thornaby-on-Tees on the south bank of the Tees with the Tees Valley Regeneration's £320 million North Shore development on the north bank. The name derives from the infinity symbol formed by the bridge and its reflection.
The route continues past the University Colleges to the Victoria Bridge where you cross to the other side of the river. Here you can pick up the Teesdale Way and follow it east along the northern side of the river, back to the car park.
Peaslake11 miles (17 km)This village in the Surrey Hills is in a nice location for exploring the Surrey Hills and Greensand Ridge. This circular walk takes you to some of the highlights of the area including the expansive woodland of Hurt Wood, the iconic Leith Hill and the pretty Abinger Common. The route runs for a distance of just over 10 miles with some moderate climbs on the way.
The walk starts in the village and heads south through Hurt Wood where you can see lots flowering Rhodedendron in the spring months. At the Duke of Kent School you can pick up the Greensand Way. The long distance, waymarked trail will guide you east through Pasture Wood and then up on to the summit of Leith Hill. The hill is the highest point in the South East and the highest hill on the Greensand Ridge. On the summit of Leith Hill is an 18th century Gothic tower, with panoramic views northwards to London and south to the English Channel.
After taking in the views the route turns north towards Broadmoor before heading west to Abinger Common. Here you'll find miles of nice woodland trails, ponds, streams and great views from the many viewpoints on the expansive common.
The route continues west, passsing the village of Holmbury St Mary, before a final woodland section takes you back into Peaslake.
Woldingham5 miles (8 km)A circular walk from Woldingham train station taking you into the Surrey Hills AONB. The route runs for about 5 miles, exploring the countryside and woods to the south of the village.
Start the walk from Woldingham train station. You can catch trains from London Victoria to the village in about 30 minutes. From here you pick up footpaths heading south through the Marden Park estate. The estate was established in the 17th century by Sir Robert Clayton, Lord Mayor of London. The house, rebuilt in the 1880s, became the Convent of the Sacred Heart, a Catholic boarding school, now known as Woldingham School.
Continue south through the estate and eventually you will meet with the North Downs Way. Follow the trail east and it will take you through some nice woodland to Gangers Hill. The trail then turns north to take you through Great Church Wood before returning to the train station.
Coulsdon South Circular Walk9 miles (14.5 km)This circular walk from Coulsdon South train station makes use of some of the area's waymarked footpaths to take you on a tour of the hills, countryside and woods to the south of Coulsdon. The route run for just over 8 miles and is a great way to enjoy some nice North Downs scenery from the outskirts of London.
Starting from the train station you immediately pick up the London Loop and follow it south across Farthing Downs. The downs are a large area of chalk grassland surrounded by attractive woodland and countryside.
The trail then leads through Happy Valley Park where you will find Devilsden Wood and more chalk grassland with interesting flora such as the rare man orchid and round-headed rampion.
You then branch of to the east to visit Coulsdon Common. The (127 acre) public open space has some nice woodland and grassland to explore.
The path continues past Dean Hill and Piles Wood before coming to Chaldon. Near here you pick up a section of the North Downs Way. Follow this west past Hilltop Farm before picking up the Downland Circular Walk. This will take you north past Tollsworth Manor, a 15th Century Grade II listed house with a 17th and 19th century extension.
The final section takes you north past Alderstead Heath to return to Farthing Downs and the train station.
Abinger Roughs2 miles (3 km)This circular walk in Abinger Hammer takes you around an attractive, elevated woodland area.
Start your walk from the car park at the eastern end of the site. From here you can pick up nature trails heading west towards Arbinger Hammer. There's a series of nice shady woodland paths and in the spring months you can see carpets of bluebells and lots of lovely Rhododendrons flowering. The Roughs also include magnificent oak trees, open glades and fine views over the North Downs from the high points.
At the western side of the woods you will find the delightful village of Arbinger Hammer. In summer the village green is popular with people picnicing on the grass whilst watching a game of cricket in surroundings which are quintessentially English. The River Tillingbourne also flows through the village. Brown trout regurlarly swim in the stream and the occasional larger rainbow trout can also be sighted. You can enjoy refreshments in the delightful Abinger Hammer Village Shop & Tea Rooms which has a nice garden from which you can watch the cricket.
Guildford to Chilford9 miles (14.8 km)This circular walk from Guildford visits the 17th century Chilworth manor. It's about a 3 mile walk from the town to the house. This walk continues to Blackheath Common and Shalford before returning to Guildford along the River Wey.
The walk starts on the River Wey Navigation in Guidlford and heads south along the water to Shalford Park. Here you can pick up the North Downs Way and follow it east to St Martha's Hill. The hill summit stands at 574 feet (175 m) and commands wonderful views over the Surrey Hills. There are also a number of nice woodland trails, attractive grassland and a number of interesting plants. From the hill it is a short descent to Chilworth Manor which is grade II listed by Historic England. The house is surrounded by lovely gardens which include a fine terraced walled garden, topiary, herbaceous borders, sculptures, mature trees and stew ponds that date back a 1000 years. From the house it is a short walk south west to the village of Chilworth. The village is in an attractive location occupying both sides of the River Tillingbourne between outcrops of the Greensand Ridge. There's a nice gastro-pub in the village where you can stop for refreshments at what is roughly the half way point of the walk.
After passing the manor the walk continues to Blackheath Common. The 250 common is covered with footpaths taking you to lowland heathland, woodland and acid grassland. From the common you follow the Downs Link west towards Shalford. Here you pick up a lovely waterside footpath along the River Wey to take you back into Guildford.
Limpsfield Common2 miles (3 km)This area of common land in the Surrey Hills has some nice woodland trails to try. There's hundreds of attractive beech trees and carpets of bluebells in the spring. At the eastern end of the common you will find a lovely community orchard which is a haven for wildlife and wildflowers. It's a nice spot for a picnic with lots of butterflies fluttering around the blossoms in the spring months.
Shere9 miles (14.5 km)The attractive Surrey village of Shere is in a great location for exploring the Surrey Hills and the North Downs. This circular walk makes use of the North Downs Way and other public footpaths to visit some of the highlights of the area including Newlands Corner, St Martha's Hill and Albury Park. The route runs for a distance of 9 miles with some moderate climbs along the way. From the high points there are splendid view over the surrounding countryside to enjoy.
The walk starts in the village centre and heads north past Netley Park to meet with the North Downs Way. Follow the waymarked path west and it will take you past Chantry Wood and Clandon Downs to Newlands Corner. The lovely beauty spot is one of the highlights of the area and is very popular with walkers and cyclists. There's several nice woodland trails and open chalk downland with wonderful views over the Surrey Hills. You can also look out for wildlife including roe deer, green woodpeckers, nuthatches and tawny owls.
The route continues west to St Martha's Hill, another fine spot for walkers. The hill summit stands at 574 feet (175 m) and commands wonderful views of the surrounding area. There are also a number of nice woodland trails, attractive grassland and a number of interesting plants.
After taking in the views the route heads south past Chilworth Manor, a 17th century manor house and Grade II listed building. You then pick up public footpaths to take you south east eventually reaching the woodland of Albury Warren. Here you reach Albury Park where you will find 150 acres of parkland with lots of walking trails to try. Features include peaceful woodland, pretty lakes and views of the River Tillingbourne. There is also the Grade II listed Albury country house and the Saxon Old St Peter and St Paul's Church to see.
After exploring the park you follow footpaths back into Shere where there are some quality pubs for refreshments after your walk. It's also nice to stroll around the village where you will find pretty cottages, shops including a blacksmith and trekking shop, a tea house, art gallery, and a noteworthy Norman church.
Penzance to St Ives9 miles (14 km)This walk takes you between two major Cornish Coastal towns. It follows the St Michaels Way waymarked trail from Penzance to St Ives, through some lovely Cornish countryside. The route runs for about 9 miles with some moderate climbs along the way. At the end of the walk you can catch a train back from St Ives to Penzance. For a much longer coastal route see the section of the South West Coast Path.
The walk starts from Penzance at the train station, near the seafront. From here you can pick up the St Michael's Way and follow it east to Chyandour. Here you turn inland and follow the trail north east to Ludgvan. The route then heads north to the noteworthy Trencrom Hill which is owned by the National Trust. The prominent hill fort,  is crowned by an univallate Neolithic tor enclosure and was re-used as a hillfort in the Iron Age. Cairns or hut circles can be seen in the level area enclosed by the stone and earth banks.
After passing the hill the route continues past the rocky outcrop at Bowl Rock before coming to the village of Carbis Bay. You'll pass Knill Monument, known locally as 'The Steeple', a 50-foot (15 m) high monument to John Knill, a mayor of nearby St Ives during the 18th-century. The lovely village of Carbis Bay overlooks the small bay of the same name. It is bounded to the north by Porthminster Point and to the east by Hawk's Point and contains a popular family beach. Here the route then joins the coastal path and follows it north to St Ives, finishing at the train station. Here you can catch a train back to Penzance, changing at St Erth. It's only about a 30 minute ride.
St Ives to Lelant Walk4 miles (6 km)Enjoy a lovely strech of the South West Coast Path from St Ives to Lelant in Cornwall. You can return on the train at the end of the walk from Lelant Saltings Station. The walk runs for a distance of just under 4 miles along a fairly flat, waymarked path.
The walk starts on Porthminster Beach next to the train station in St Ives. You then head south to the lovely village of Carbis Bay which overlooks the small bay of the same name. It is bounded to the north by Porthminster Point and to the east by Hawk's Point and contains a popular family beach. There's also the noteworthy Carbis Bay Hotel, on the seafront, which was built in 1894 by Silvanus Trevail. Just behind the village stands the Knill Monument, known locally as 'The Steeple', a 50-foot (15 m) high monument to John Knill, a mayor of nearby St Ives during the 18th-century.
You continue east past the interesting rocks at Carrack Gladde. The cliffs between Carrack Gladden headland and Hawks Point to the east are of metamorphosed Devonian slates and rise to 60 metres high. Near here you will also find the beautiful Porth Kidney Sands which sits just to the north of Lelant. This final section has lovely views over the Hayle Estuary. The estuary is also a significant nature reserve with 18,000 birds including many wading birds, gulls and terns. Look out for teal, curlew, little egret and oystercatcher as you make your way along the estuary.
The walk finishes at Lelant Saltings railway station. Here you can catch a direct train back to St Ives or you can retrace your steps. It's also possible to turn it into a longer circular walk by heading west to Mennor and picking up the St Michaels Way long distance trail. This leads back through the countryside to Carbis Bay.
Chilterns Pub Walk - Aldbury7 miles (11 km)This walk climbs to the wonderful Ivinghoe Beacon from the splendid Greyhound Inn in the Chilterns village of Aldbury. You'll enjoy some of the finest views in the Chilterns with a great reward of a fine meal at the inn at the end of your walk.
You start off at the Greyhound Inn in Aldbury. It's a very pretty village with its nice cottages and duck pond. From here you can pick up footpaths heading north through Aldbury Common which sits on the western side of the popular Ashridge Estate. The walk follows a section of the Ashridge Boundary Trail through the common where there are nice peaceful woodland trails and lots of interesting flora and fauna to look out for.
At Incombe Hole the route picks up the Icknield Way Path to take you up to Ivinghoe Beacon. The iconic hill stands at 233 m (757 ft) and commands fine views over the Chiltern Hills and the Vale of Aylesbury.
The route then heads east to visit Gallows Hill before descending back to the Ashridge Estate.
Maldon3 miles (5.2 km)This pretty Essex town has a series of delightful waterside footpaths to try. This circular walk runs for a distance of just over 3 miles on fairly flat footpaths. On the way you'll enjoy nice views of the River Chelmer, the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation Canal, and the River Blackwater. The route also includes a visit to the pretty Elms Farm Park.
The walk starts on Fullbridge, over the River Chelmer, in the town centre. From here you can pick up footpaths heading north west toward Beeleigh Abbey. The abbey was originally constructed in 1180 for the White Canons, otherwise known as the Norbertines or Premonstratensians. It is now a private residence and not generally open to the public, but small private groups may be shown around it by prior arrangement with the owners. The roofs of the resilient medieval buildings can be seen from a footpath that runs down market hill and ends following the River Chelmer. The abbey gardens, are now also open to the public, on specific days during the summer months.
The route continues to Beeleigh Falls where you can enjoy the rushing water of the weirs and see Beeleigh Falls House, an attractive Victorian villa. At the falls you change direction to pick up the a trail along the River Blackwater. You'll pass along Maldon Golf Club before coming to a bridge where you can cross to enter Elms Farm Park. The park has nice paths and running along a pretty lake and interesting flora and fauna to see.
After exploring the park you can return to the river and follow the trails back to Fullbridge.
Beeleigh Falls2 miles (2.5 km)Enjoy a short walk to these pretty falls on the River Chelmer in Essex. It's an interesting spot, where four waterways converge with a series of locks and weirs. The River Chelmer, River Blackwater, the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation Canal and the tidal Chelmer all meet at Beeleigh Falls. It's a great place for birdwatching so keep your eyes peeled for the Kingfishers which frequent the area.
The walk starts in the village of Langford just to the north of the falls. From here you can pick up footpaths running south along the Langford Cut, the section of the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation (canal) which approaches Maldon. It will take you to the falls where you can also see Beeleigh Falls House, an attractive Victorian villa.
Finchingfield4 miles (6.5 km)A nice circular walk from the Essex village of Finchingfield, visiting Great Bardfield, the River Pant and the Finchingfield Brook. The route runs for just over 4 miles on fairly flat paths, with nice views of the surrounding countryside for most of the way.
The walk starts in the attractive village of Finchingfield which is recognised as one of the most beautiful villages in England. The picture postcard settlement includes a duck pond, a village green, an eighteenth-century windmill and a number of Georgian and medieval cottages. Finchingfield was the home and is the burial place of Dodie Smith, whose books include The Hundred and One Dalmatians.  From the village you can pick up footpaths running south along Finchingfield Brook, passing The Watermill before coming into Great Bardfield. Henry VIII is said to have given Bardfield to Anne of Cleves as part of his divorce settlement and a number of buildings in the village are associated with her, including the Grade II-listed Great Lodge and its associated Grade I-listed barn, now named after her. In the village you can enjoy refreshments at the village pub which has a nice pub garden and a good selection of real ales.
After exploring Great Bardfield the route heads north west toward Beslyns before following Winsey Chase back to Finchingfield. Back in the village you can enjoy refreshments at the delightful tea rooms.
Heybridge Basin4 miles (6.2 km)This easy waterside walk takes you from Heybridge Basin to the Chigborough Lakes Nature Reserve on the Blackwater Estuary in Essex. There's lovely views across the river estuary and lots of wildlife to look out for on the way. The route runs for 4 miles on flat footpaths. You can turn it into a longer circular walk by heading through the eastern part of Maldon and linking up with the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation Canal.
The walk starts at the car park next to the canal, to the east of the town. From here you can pick footpaths running along Collier's Reach with nice views towards Northey Island. Turn north to cross Goldhanger Road and you can enter the Chigborough Nature Reserve. The reserve is run by Essex Wildlife Trust and includes 2 km of circular walking trails. These will take you around a series of pretty lakes with Willow Carr, marshy areas, grazed grassland and scrub. It's a great place for birdwatching so keep your eyes peeled for Little Egret, Great Crested and Little Grebes, Grey Heron and Kingfisher as you make your way through the reserve.
After exploring the reserve the route returns to the estuary path where you can retrace your steps back to the car park.
Blackwater Estuary13 miles (21 km)Enjoy a walk along the lovely Blackwater Estuary from Maldon to Tollesbury. Flat footpaths run right along the river estuary with fine views and lots of wildlife to look out for on the way. The National Nature Reserve is home to little tern, ringed plover, Pied avocet, dunlin and Hen Harrier so be sure to bring your binoculars. The route runs for just over 13 miles with the option of catching the bus back to Maldon.
The walk starts in the Essex town of Maldon, at the parking area next to the start of the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation Canal. From here you can pick up a footpath heading east past the Heybridge Basin, Collier's Reach and Barrow Marsh. On this section you can enjoy fine views over to Northey Island. The island is home to a diverse range of birdlife and can be visited by arrangement with the warden.
You continue along Goldhanger Creek and Thirslet Creek before rounding the Tollesbury Wick Marshes. This nature reserve consists of coastal freshwater marsh which is grazed by sheep, and is worked by traditional methods which encourage wildlife. Areas of ungrazed rough pasture have badgers, and field voles and pygmy shrews are hunted by hen harriers and short-eared owls. After passing through the reserve the route finishes in the village of Tollesbury. The village is located at the mouth of the River Blackwater and has a nice pub where you can enjoy refreshments at the end of your exercise. You can then catch the bus back to Maldon.
Shoulder of Mutton Hill and Edward Thomas3 miles (5 km)This literary walk in Hampshire climbs to Shoulder of Mutton Hill to visit the memorial of the poet Edward Thomas. The circular route runs for just over 3 miles with a moderate climb on the way. There's lovely views over the Hampshire Downs to enjoy on the way.
The walk starts from the village of Hawkley and heads south along the Hangers Way waymarked trail. You'll pass Oakshott before climbing to Shoulder of Mutton Hill. Here you'll find a sarsen stone dedicated to Edward Thomas erected in 1935. The inscription includes the final line from one of his essays: 'And I rose up and knew I was tired and I continued my journey.' The steep Hampshire Hangars inspired many of his poems including Up in the Wind, The New House and Wind and Mist. There's also splendid views across the South Downs from here.
The route then descends past Wheatham Hill and Cheescombe Farm before returning to Hawkley. Here you can enjoy refreshments at the Hawkley Inn.
Walk Around Alton6 miles (9 km)This Staffordshire village is most well known for the Alton Towers Theme Park but it also has some lovely walks to try. This circular walk uses Staffordshire Way to take you to one of the highlights of the area at Dimmingsdale. These lovely woods include waymarked footpaths taking you along a series of pools and streams with interesting sandstone outcrops and lots of wildlife to look out for on the way.
The walk runs for just under 6 miles, rising to a height of over 700ft from the high points. Starting from the village you can pick up the waymarked trail and follow it north west to the woods. At Hawksmoor you turn around and pass through Sutton's Wood before picking up the Ousal Dale Track and returning to the village.
Here you can see the noteworthy Alton Castle. The gothic-rivival castle was constructed in the mid-19th century by John Talbot, 16th Earl of Shrewsbury. The original castle dates from the 12th century, built on a rocky precipice overlooking the River Churnet.
Noar Hill4 miles (6 km)This circular walk climbs to the Noar Hill Nature Reserve from the pretty village of Selborne, in the Hampshire Downs. It's a very pretty area, notable for its extensive flora, including many widlfowers and 11 species of orchid. In the summer months you can see several species of buttefly fluttering around the flowers. These include marbled white (Melanargia galathea), brown argus (Aricia agestis), Duke of Burgundy (Hamearis lucina), brown hairstreak (Thecla betulae), and holly blue. Birds include common buzzards, hen harrier and green woodpecker. 
The walk starts from Selborne where you can pick up the Hangers Way long distance trail. Follow the path south past Homestead Farm before heading east to climb past High Wood Hangar to Noar Hill. It forms one of the westerly outposts of the chalk hills called the South Downs, and rises to a maximum height of about 210 metres above sea-level.
The path then runs along Noar Hill Hangar before descending to Charity Farm. You then follow country lanes back to Homestead Farm before heading back to Selborne where you can enjoy refreshments at the Selborne Arms pub which has a good selection of real ales and a decent menu too.
Selborne Common2 miles (3.5 km)This circular walk visits Selborne Common and Selborne Hill, one of the highest points in the county of Hampshire. The common is owned by the National Trust and has a number of nice woodland trails to try. In the woods you can see a variety of wildflowers including yellow archangel, wood spurge and wood anemone. Also look out for lots of butterflies such as  Duke of Burgundy, silver-washed fritillary and purple emperor. Notable birds to see include buzzard, sparrowhawk, stock dove, tawny owl, green woodpecker and great spotted woodpecker. From the high points you can enjoy lovely views over the South Downs.
The walk starts from the attractive village of Selborne. The village is notable for its links with the world-famous naturalist, Revd. Gilbert White, who was a pioneer of birdwatching. White is recognised as being the first ecologist or environmentalist. There's also a Grade I listed church that dates back to the late 12th century.
From the village you head south west along the Zig-Zag path to the hill. Selborne Hill is one of the East Hampshire Hangers, a line of prominent hills on the eastern scarp slope of the Hampshire Downs. It stands at a height of 211 metres (692 ft) and is mostly covered with woodland.
After reaching the hill summit the route bends round towards Coneycroft Hill before picking up a path along Selborne Hangar to return to the village. Here you can enjoy refreshments at the Selborne Arms pub which has a good selection of real ales and a decent menu too.